Radiological Preparedness Training

9/15/2020

Hazmat team members check container for leaks on train rail tracks

Introduction

Responding to a radiological incident or emergency can be a daunting, dangerous and deadly task. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), radiological emergencies can be accidental or deliberate and trigger a release of radiation or risk of exposure. For example, such events include the explosion of nuclear weapons, dirty bombs and radiological exposure devices, and transportation and occupational incidents involving radiation. However, training is offered by a number of organizations, including governmental, tribal and national consortiums. Government organizations generally include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP). Tribal organizations include the Inter-Tribal Emergency Management Association (iTEMA). Finally, there are national consortiums such as the National Alliance for Radiation Readiness (NARR) and the Rad Responder Network (RRN).

Training primarily covers topics related to radiological incidents or emergency responses and addresses issues such as public health, the environment, counterterrorism, and relief and recovery operations. Training courses vary by cost, prerequisites and location. For example, DHS training courses are offered free of charge to state, local and tribal first responders and other courses are offered remotely at no cost to any interested person. Other courses, however, have a cost to enroll, such as the EPA’s computer-aided management course, which teaches students how to use the software necessary for planning and responding to chemical emergencies. The cost for this course is $350 and assists front-line chemical emergency planners and responders.

Radiological Preparedness Training Chart 

Training courses listed in the charts below are meant to offer a sense of what is currently available. This list is not exhaustive and interested persons should contact the hosting entity regarding enrollment questions or concerns, especially related to COVID-19. The primary entities hosting trainings include the federal government, tribal and national consortiums. Other general resources are also available through nonprofit organizations.

Please check the current status of available trainings as they may be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Federal Government

Description

Cost

Prerequisites

Location

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Offers training related to public health, medical responses, environmental issues and overall response, relief and recovery operations.

No

No

Radiation Emergencies

Radiation Exposure

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Radiation Emergency Medical Management: Provides information on emergency training; detection; external contamination; decontamination for emergency, medical and hospital workers; and injury treatment exercises.

No

No

Radiation Courses

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Center for Domestic Preparedness: Provides advanced, all-hazards training to approximately 50,000 emergency responders annually from state, local, tribal and territorial governments. The scope of training includes preparedness, protection and response.

Free for state, local and tribal first responders.

Yes, and vary by course.

Online Courses

Training Calendar

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA): The Emergency Management Institute provides national leadership in developing and delivering training to ensure that individuals and groups having key emergency management responsibilities, including FEMA employees, possess the requisite skills to effectively perform their jobs.

Free for state, local and tribal first responders.

Yes, and vary by course.

IS-3, Radiological Emergency Management

 

IS-5.A, Introduction to Hazardous Materials

 

IS-100.C, Introduction to the Incident Command System

IS-200.C, Basic Incident Command System for Initial Response

 

IS-235.C, Emergency Planning

 

IS-700.B, Introduction to National Incident Management System

 

IS-800.D, Introduction to National Response Framework

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations (CAMEO) is a system of software applications used to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies.

Yes, $350 for CAMEO training.

 

No

Los Angeles

CAMEO Training: No training sessions are currently scheduled.

 

Online Resources

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Created in 1974 to ensure the safe use of radioactive materials for beneficial civilian purposes while protecting people and the environment. Training materials include basic health physics, reactor concepts, power plant engineering and site access.

No

No

Online Training

No

Yes, and vary by course.

NRC-sponsored Training courses include industrial radiography, irradiator technology and advanced health physics).

 U.S. Department of Energy, Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program: Integrates a basic approach to transportation emergency planning and preparedness activities under a single program with the goal to ensure DOE, its operating contractors and state, tribal and local emergency responders are prepared to respond promptly, efficiently and effectively to accidents involving shipments of radioactive material.

No

No

General Training

 

Model Procedures

 

Radioactive Contamination

National Domestic Preparedness Consortium: A partnership of several nationally recognized organizations whose membership is based on addressing counterterrorism preparedness of the nation’s emergency first responders within the context of all hazards, including chemical, biological, radiological and explosive weapons of mass destruction (WMD) hazards.

Yes, and vary by course.

Yes, and vary by course.

Course Catalog

 

New/Upcoming Courses

Counterterrorism Operations Support: Training courses cover emergency responses related to radiological and nuclear WMDs.

Free for state, local and tribal first responders.

No

Las Vegas, for in-person trainings.

 

Future Courses

 

Online Training

 

Resident Training

 

Mobile Training

National Consortiums

Description

Cost

Prerequisites

Location

National Alliance for Radiation Readiness: A coalition of public health, health care and emergency management organizations.

No

No

Public Health

 

General Training

Rad Responder Network: A national standard and “Whole Community” solution for the management of radiological data. It is a product of collaboration between FEMA, U.S. DOE, the National Nuclear Security Administration and EPA.

Free for state, local and tribal first responders.

No

Instructional Videos

 

Resource Documents

Inter-Tribal Emergency Management Association: Promotes a collaborative, multi-disciplinary approach to coordinate and enhance emergency management, response and recovery to protect all tribal communities.

FEMA training is free for state, local and tribal first responders.

Yes, and vary by course.

Future courses are not scheduled.

General Training Resources

Description

Cost

Prerequisites

Council of State Governments (CSG), East: The Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project works with state officials from CSG East’s member states to facilitate communication with the federal government about planning national nuclear waste shipment.

No

No

Council of State Governments, Midwest: Organized in 1989, CSG's Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee brings the Midwestern states together to identify, prioritize and work with DOE to resolve regional issues related to the transport of radioactive waste and materials, including spent nuclear fuel.

No

No

National Tribal Emergency Management Council: General information on tribal incident management assistance and recommended practices by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs.

No

No

Northwest Tribal Emergency Management Council: Materials include example Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plans, as required by FEMA. Example: Tulalip Tribes of Washington plan?.

No

No

Southern States Energy Board: The Materials Transportation Committee provides DOE with southern states’ perspective on policy related to nuclear power and transportation of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Example: the Southern Mutual Radiation Assistance Plan.

No

No

U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety Health Administration: Provides resources concerning radiological dispersal, fixed-site nuclear hazards, behavioral health, evacuation and sheltering, emergency communications and ongoing response, recovery and relief operations. Additionally, the website offers radiation emergency contact and other information by state, which generally addresses health, management, safety, shipments and preparedness.

No

No