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Absentee/Mail Voting
  • Arizona SB 1273 adds a provision to voter instructions that says that a ballot can only be returned by the voter, a member of the voter’s family or household, or the voter’s caregiver. The bill makes it unlawful for anyone else to handle or return another person’s ballot.
  • Arkansas SB 247 expands absentee voting to individuals who are unable to get to the polls because they are observing a religious holiday or other religious matter during the entire time the polls are open on Election Day.
  • Arkansas SB 258 prohibits the use of drop boxes. The law requires that absentee ballots be returned via mail or in person to the county clerk’s office.
  • Arkansas HB 1411 requires that absentee ballot applications be blank when sent to a voter, except for information the voter registration system automatically populates. A person who assists an applicant in filling out an application form must provide their own information on the application. A person authorized by law to pick up another person’s absentee ballot on their behalf must provide a valid photo ID to receive the ballot.
  • Arkansas HB 1487 requires county boards of election commissioners to provide county clerks with ballot count reports including the date absentee ballots were delivered and the names of the individuals who delivered the ballots. The bill also establishes chain of custody procedures for absentee and provisional ballots.
  • Arkansas HB 1512 makes minor changes governing the return of absentee ballots from overseas voters.
  • California SB 77 instructs county election officials to notify voters of ballot signature defects via phone, text or email when the voter has provided such contact information.
  • California AB 626 allows a vote-by-mail voter in a county conducting an all-mail election to return their ballot in person at a polling place or vote center without the ballot envelope. The bill establishes procedures to ensure that any such voter has not voted twice or engaged in other fraudulent activity.
  • California AB 1037 allows voters to electronically cure a signature defect. It requires counties to ensure that electronic signature transmission is private and secure.
  • California AB 1762 revises the circumstances under which a county can opt to conduct an all-mail election and updates various vote center procedures. It prohibits at-large officeholders who run for a district-based office from indicating they are "incumbents" on the ballot. It also makes various technical and conforming updates to the election code.
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Connecticut HB 6870 requires municipal clerks to collect absentee ballots from drop boxes each weekday starting on the first day absentee ballots are issued.
  • Delaware HB 148 requires county directors' offices to provide election districts with election supplies. It requires commissioners to deliver a report containing the number of ballots supplied to each district to the legislature after the election. It also revises absentee ballot pre-processing and tabulation procedures.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Georgia SB 129 requires employees to be provided time off to vote. It also makes updates to local election official performance reviews, absentee ballot application forms, and risk-limiting audit procedures.
  • Hawaii SB 19 stipulates that a mail-in ballot will not be declared invalid solely because the voter dies or otherwise becomes ineligible to vote after casting the ballot.
  • Illinois SB 2123 amends notice and ballot explanation rules for proposed state constitutional amendments. It also creates a Ranked-Choice Voting Systems Task Force to review the possibility of implementing RCV in 2028. It makes Election Day a state holiday. It also establishes a Security of Remote Vote by Mail Task Force to study the possibility of transmitting ballots electronically. It updates list maintenance procedures and allows 16-year-olds to preregister. It makes minor changes to political party central committee membership composition and nomination procedures. It updates vote center and curbside voting requirements and requires that notice be given of polling location changes occurring close to an election. It requires that constitutional amendments appear on the same ballot as candidate races. It requires election officials to provide the information of voters whose mail ballots are rejected to the State Board of Elections.
  • Indiana HB 1334 updates absentee ballot request ID requirements and prohibits election officials from providing a voter with an absentee ballot application unless requested. It also requires the Bureau of Motor Vehicles to provide the voter registration system with driver's license and other information every day for list maintenance.
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Kansas SB 221 updates write-in candidacy filing, election notice and selection processes for election commission procedures. It also updates signature verification rules and requires county election officials to provide voters who submit unsigned ballots notice an opportunity to cure the ballot. It also specifies that voters must apply for an absentee ballot to receive one. It allows poll observers to be present at recounts and audits, in addition to canvasses. It adds constitutional amendment questions to audit procedures when applicable. The bill also allows any voter who voted in an election containing a constitutional amendment to request a recount. It amends the recount request deadline. It allows political parties to decide by Jan. 15 of each year whether they will allow unaffiliated voters to vote in their primaries that year. It amends party precinct chairperson rules and procedures. It adds unauthorized access to voting system equipment and publishing confidential information related to voting systems, poll books, etc. to the list of actions that constitute electronic or electromechanical voting system or electronic poll book fraud and does similarly for optical scanning equipment fraud.
  • Louisiana HB 174 requires that UOCAVA voters’ active duty status, dependent status and ballot mailing address be kept confidential.
  • Louisiana HB 496 puts the Department of State in charge of mailing registration notices to voters, instead of registrars. It also makes some changes to the process of requesting copies of registrars' records and prohibits them from furnishing copies of registration applications from 16- and 17-year-olds. It also updates the dates for some municipal and special elections. It also creates new procedures for filling vacancies in political party committees, sets an opening date for the presidential primary filing period on the third Wednesday in December, and updates the form of provisional and absentee ballot envelope certificates. It also makes minor updates to absentee ballot voting and tabulation procedures to conform with a new certificate form.
  • Maine HB 552 allows clerks to issue absentee ballots to voters with physical and mental disabilities 3 business days before Election Day.
  • Maine SB 677 allows for all registered voters to apply for ongoing absentee voter status.
  • Maine HB 1013 protects physical access to ballot drop boxes.
  • Maryland SB 379 requires county boards of elections to send absentee ballots to voters who qualify and request one no later than 43 days before an election. The bill also allows voters to track and cure their ballot. It also allows election officials to begin processing ballots eight days before Election Day.
  • Maryland HB 535 requires county boards of elections to send absentee ballots to voters who qualify and request one no later than 43 days before an election. The bill also allows voters to track and cure their ballot. It also allows election officials to begin processing ballots 8 days before Election Day.
  • Michigan SB 259 allows eligible overseas voters to vote an electronic ballot and lays out related electronic voting processes. 
  • Michigan SB 339 requires the Secretary of State to establish an electronic ballot tracking and curing system.
  • Michigan SB 370 refines absentee voting processes, including applying for an absentee ballot, curing a ballot, and timelines for receiving absentee applications and ballots.
  • Michigan HB 4699 establishes a permanent absentee voter list.
  • Michigan SB 470 allows UOCAVA voters to receive registration applications, vote-by-mail applications, and ballots electronically. Ballots must be returned via mail. Applications can be returned electronically. Beginning Sept. 1, 2025, active duty members of the military may return ballots electronically.
  • Michigan SB 590 clarifies that absentee ballot application deadlines and deadlines for challenging presidential election results will not be adjusted if they fall on weekends or holidays.
  • Michigan HB 4570 expands methods of application for an absentee ballot, including by creating an online application.
  • Minnesota HB 3 allows 16- and 17-year-olds to submit voter registration applications to preregister, and allows for automatic voter registration. The bill also requires the secretary of state to keep a list of voters who vote absentee permanently, and requires the state to provide instructions and sample ballots in languages other than English. It also prohibits intimidation and interference with voters and election officials. It also appropriates money to the secretary of state to implement the programs mentioned in the bill.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting.
  • Montana HB 335 requires that inactive voters may not receive a mail ballot until they reactivate their registration. It also requires an election official to attempt to contact a voter whose ballot is returned undeliverable.
  • Nebraska L 514 requires voter ID to cast a ballot or receive a mail-in ballot. It allows voters to use state, federal, tribal, or assisted-living photo IDs as a voter ID. It allows voters without ID to fill out a “reasonable impediment” certification or a provisional voter ID verification form under penalty of election falsification. A voter who uses a provisional must present ID or a reasonable impediment form on or before the Tuesday after the election. It provides that state ID cards will be issued free of charge to anyone who does not have a driver's license and is requesting the ID for voting purposes. It provides that birth certificate copies will be issued free of charge if requested for the purpose of applying for voter ID. It requires the secretary of state to publish voter ID instructions. It also requires the Secretary to verify voters' citizenship status and prohibits the secretary of state from allowing the citizenship information it collects for list maintenance from being used for any other purposes, including law enforcement. It requires clerks to mail voter instructions with mail ballots.
  • New Hampshire HB 244 requires clerks to mail ballots to those who request them up until noon on the day before the election. The bill also requires clerks to provide an absentee ballot to voters that show up in person until 5 p.m. on the day before the election.
  • New York AB 1177 stipulates that a ballot envelope will not be considered invalid if it is sealed with tape or a similar substance and there is no other indication of tampering.
  • New York SB 7394 supplements the state’s current absentee ballot practices by establishing an early voting by mail system akin to no-excuse absentee voting. It lays out procedures including how voters can request a ballot and when and how they must return their ballots.
  • New York AB 7690 changes the 2024 presidential primary date to April 2 (from Feb. 6), with early voting available from March 23-30. It allows state party committees to determine when and how to select national convention delegates. It establishes some procedures for conducting primaries, selecting delegates, and certification and filing rules for delegates and presidential candidates. It lays out specific presidential primary and delegate selection procedures for the Republican Party and gives other parties the option to follow those same procedures. It stipulates that a ballot returned two to seven days after the election with no postmark can be cured by the voter’s attestation. The bill also prohibits county boards of elections from conducting manual recounts unless they first complete and announce the results of a statutorily required recanvass.
  • Nevada AB 192 outlines guidelines for recount requests, allows the secretary of state to prescribe the type and color of mail ballots, and requires clerks to post a sign stating that electioneering is prohibited at polling places.
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections.
  • Oklahoma SB 376 refines absentee ballot affidavit instructions.
  • Oregon SB 166 establishes a right to vote in state law. It also guarantees the right to a secret ballot and prohibits election officials from disclosing how anyone voted. It requires county election clerks to establish cybersecurity plans. It clarifies that voter information protected by the Address Confidentiality Program will not be subject to public inspection. It makes petition signatures subject to public inspection pursuant to the state's public records laws. It makes largely technical updates to the state's prohibitions on fraudulent activity in the petition circulation process. It makes minor updates to election law violation complaint filing procedures. It makes various updates to candidate filing timelines and petition signature requirements. It requires clerks to file amended abstracts of vote totals 30 days after the election for ballot measures instead of 37 days. It allows absentee voters to pick up their ballot from the county clerk's office starting 43 days before the date of the election and requires that ballots be mailed out by that same deadline.
  • South Dakota HB 1165 prohibits distributing absentee ballot applications to voters that are prefilled with the voter's name and address. It also prohibits ballot drop boxes. It also amends absentee ballot request and return procedures and voter assistant rules.
  • Texas HB 357 sets rules for when runoff elections may occur. It also makes minor updates to Texas's online system for tracking absentee ballot applications.
  • Texas SB 1599 establishes procedures for returning vote by mail ballots at polling places. It also establishes notice and cure procedures for defective absentee ballot application forms and amends notice and cure procedures for defects on mail-in ballots, including signature defects. It requires the secretary of state to develop an online platform that allows voters to track the status of absentee ballots and applications and correct some defects online. It also updates the deadline for delivering vote-by-mail ballots to election boards.
  • Texas HB 315 makes a minor update to absentee ballot application instructions.
  • Texas HB 1299 requires ballot envelopes to be signed in ink, prohibiting electronic or photocopied signatures.
  • Texas SB 477 requires election officials to allow voters with mobility impairments to vote before people without such disabilities who are already in line. It also establishes curbside voting. It requires that early voting and absentee ballot applications be able to be filled out online before being printed and submitted.
  • Utah SB 17 updates criteria and procedures for determining and challenging a voter's residency. It allows voters experiencing homelessness to use a nontraditional location for the purposes of voting residency. It stipulates that voters whose principal residence is outside the U.S. can only vote in federal elections and clarifies what congressional districts overseas voters vote in. It also allows overseas voters to register and vote at the same time if their ballot and registration declaration are received by the day before the election.
  • Utah HB 37 requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It also specifies that a voter's signature on their return envelope be "reasonably consistent" with the signature on file. It allows voters with disabilities preventing them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those ballots. It requires voters whose ballot is rejected because of a signature defect to receive a copy or image of the signature defect, or for election officials to inform the voter via phone how to cure the defect. It updates timelines in which election officials must notify voters that their ballot has been rejected. It creates new reporting requirements for election officials to fulfill when rejecting ballots for signature defects and administering cure procedures. It instructs the lieutenant governor's office to promulgate rules for signature verification and training.
  • Utah HB 162 requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It allows voters with disabilities that prevent them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those voters’ ballots.
  • Utah HB 448 requires election returns to include records of when voters were contacted to cure a ballot. It establishes the lieutenant governor as the state’s chief election officer. It lays out the lieutenant governor's rights and responsibilities and details the relationship between local election officials and the lieutenant governor, including the lieutenant governor’s responsibility to oversee local election officials. It requires the lieutenant governor to develop training for election administrators and workers. It prohibits an individual who worked on an election from auditing their own work and instructs the lieutenant governor to study different audit methods. It also updates voter registration list maintenance procedures, including those related to a voter's change of address. It requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It requires a voter's signature on their return envelope to be "reasonably consistent" with the signature on file. It allows voters with disabilities preventing them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those ballots. It updates notice requirements for notice and cure procedures. It also implements ballot chain of custody procedures. It requires election officers to conduct signature verification audits and ballot reconciliation. It requires results reports to include reconciliation and provisional ballot numbers. It stipulates that only certain government and law enforcement officials may view drop box surveillance footage.
  • Virginia HB 1948 requires each registered Virginia voter to have a unique identifying number in the state registration system. It also updates the information UOCAVA voters must submit on a federal write-in ballot. It removes the witness signature requirement for voter assistance forms and mail-in ballots.
  • Wisconsin SB 433 clarifies that military and overseas voters must have their presidential primary ballots mailed to them by the 47th day before the election.
  • Wyoming SB 153 requires county clerks to conduct post-election audits. It also prohibits electronic voting systems from being connected to the internet. It updates the deadline by which clerks must distribute absentee ballots to non-UOCAVA voters. It also updates ballot chain of custody procedures and requires election judges or peace officers to deliver tabulation results to the county clerk. It allows county clerks to request that ballots be transported to central count centers in the same manner.
  • Wyoming HB 279 adds a voter ID requirement to voters obtaining absentee ballots in person.

Ballots and Voting Technology
  • Alabama SB 9 requires the use of paper ballots that a voter fills out and inspects before the ballot is read by an electronic vote counting machine.
  • Alabama SB 10 prohibits the use of voting machines that are capable of connecting to the internet or cell phone networks.
  • Arkansas SB 250 makes changes to the state’s ballot counting process by requiring the use of tabulation machines to count all paper ballots. It requires all paper ballots to be compatible with the vote tabulation machines selected by the secretary of state. The bill requires all ballots to be run through vote tabulation machines before being counted by hand. Any county that chooses to use paper ballots instead of voting machines is responsible for the cost of ensuring the paper ballots are compatible with tabulation machines. The bill also requires counties to declare preliminary, unofficial election results within 24 hours of polls closing.
  • Arkansas SB 253 creates a more detailed process for duplicating (that is, replicating) ballots that are damaged such that the tabulation machines cannot read them.
  • Arkansas SB 293 establishes a process to correct a printing or other error on ballots and to count special error correction ballots. Errors must be corrected unless it is impossible to do so in the time remaining before the election or if the costs of correcting the error outweigh the disruption to the election resulting from the error.
  • Arkansas SB 447 requires that uncontested races appear on the ballot and that votes in those races be tabulated the same way as in contested races. 
  • Arkansas HB 1405 amends the definition of “election media” under state law to encompass memory sticks and personal computer cards. 
  • Arkansas HB 1687 requires paper ballots to be compatible with tabulation machines. The bill makes any county that chooses to conduct a hand count instead of using tabulation machines responsible for the costs of the hand count. The bill lays out procedures for counting ballots.
  • California AB 1219 updates voter instructions and ballot design features including font and text placement. 
  • California AB 969 prohibits hand counting ballots except in limited circumstances. It requires the use of certified voting machines for tabulation. It requires jurisdictions to finalize contracts for a new certified voting system before terminating a contract with a different certified voting system. 
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Delaware HB 148 requires county directors' offices to provide election districts with election supplies. It requires commissioners to deliver a report containing the number of ballots supplied to each district to the legislature after the election. It also revises absentee ballot pre-processing and tabulation procedures.
  • Georgia SB 129 requires employees to be provided time off to vote. It also makes updates to local election official performance reviews, absentee ballot application forms, and risk-limiting audit procedures.
  • Hawaii HB 130 changes the suggested deadline for validating ballots from seven business days after an election to five business days.
  • Hawaii HB 1294 requires a candidate's legal name to be included wherever the candidate's name is used when the candidate requests that a different name be printed on the ballot, except that on the ballot only the candidate's requested name will appear.
  • Illinois SB 2123 amends notice and ballot explanation rules for proposed state constitutional amendments. It also creates a Ranked-Choice Voting Systems Task Force to review the possibility of implementing RCV in 2028. It makes Election Day a state holiday. It also establishes a Security of Remote Vote by Mail Task Force to study the possibility of transmitting ballots electronically. It updates list maintenance procedures and allows 16-year-olds to preregister. It makes minor changes to political party central committee membership composition and nomination procedures. It updates vote center and curbside voting requirements and requires that notice be given of polling location changes occurring close to an election. It requires that constitutional amendments appear on the same ballot as candidate races. It requires election officials to provide the information of voters whose mail ballots are rejected to the State Board of Elections.
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Louisiana HB 496 puts the Department of State in charge of mailing registration notices to voters, instead of registrars. It also makes some changes to the process of requesting copies of registrars' records and prohibits them from furnishing copies of registration applications from 16- and 17-year-olds. It also updates the dates for some municipal and special elections. It also creates new procedures for filling vacancies in political party committees, sets an opening date for the presidential primary filing period on the third Wednesday in December, and updates the form of provisional and absentee ballot envelope certificates. It also makes minor updates to absentee ballot voting and tabulation procedures to conform with a new certificate form.
  • Maryland SB 379 requires county boards of elections to send absentee ballots to voters who qualify and request one no later than 43 days before an election. The bill also allows voters to track and cure their ballot. It also allows election officials to begin processing ballots eight days before Election Day.
  • New Hampshire HB 336 updates instructions printed on ballots.
  • South Dakota HB 1124 updates procedures for testing tabulation machines prior to an election.
  • Wyoming HB 47 sets minimum standards for the certification of electronic voting machines. The bill also requires that all voting machines be certified by the secretary of state’s office before being used in elections.

Candidates and Political Parties
  • Arkansas SB 254 eliminates write-in voting.
  • Arkansas SB 277 changes the petition and filing deadlines and the number of signatures required to register a new political party.
  • Arkansas HB 1469 makes changes to the petition and filing process for some local and municipal elections.
  • Arkansas HB 1600 repeals the prohibition on candidates and public officials from displaying campaign gear on their vehicles while on State Capitol grounds.
  • California SB 25 allows a candidate who is outside the state for the duration of the entire nomination period to complete their declaration of candidacy before a notary public in a different state.
  • California SB 437 requires political parties to notify the secretary of state of their presidential and vice presidential nominees by the 75th day before the general election. It also exempts presidential and vice-presidential candidates from the prohibition on updating their name on the ballot to reflect a name change that occurred within one year of the election.
  • California AB 1762 revises the circumstances under which a county can opt to conduct an all-mail election and updates various vote center procedures. It prohibits at-large officeholders who run for a district-based office from indicating they are "incumbents" on the ballot. It also makes various technical and conforming updates to the election code.
  • California SB 386 requires cities to publish special election information before candidate nomination filing deadlines. It removes the requirement that presidential election ballots include certain voter instructions. It also extends the time period elections officials have to review initiative petition signatures.
  • California AB 398 removes the requirement that voters must make a statement under penalty of perjury that they have lost or destroyed their original mail ballot in order to receive a replacement ballot, and allows voters to receive a replacement ballot upon request after providing certain personally identifiable information.
  • California SB 386 requires cities to publish special election information before candidate nomination filing deadlines. It removes the requirement that presidential election ballots include certain voter instructions. It also extends the time period elections officials have to review initiative petition signatures. 
  • California SB 658 requires that gubernatorial candidates file income tax returns and that those filings be public in general and recall elections, in addition to primary elections. 
  • California AB 773 updates submission procedures for candidate statements to be included in voter information guides and allows candidates in multicounty districts to submit statements in each applicable county. 
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Colorado HB 1185 amends the law pertaining to vacancies and recalls in various local offices.
  • Connecticut SB 1189 amends filing deadlines for nominating petitions.
  • Connecticut HB 5004 sets early voting hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Tuesday and Thursday prior to an election. It updates various same day registration and early voting procedures. It also updates procedures related to candidates who withdraw or die before an election is held.
  • Connecticut HB 7001 updates tabulation equipment requirements. It gives party representatives the right to view ballots during recanvassing and authorizes election officials to remove from the premises individuals who disturb recanvass procedures and have no right to participate in the procedures.
  • Delaware HB 141 tasks the Commissioner of Elections with determining whether an individual is qualified to run for legislative, statewide or county elected office after reviewing criminal history background checks.
  • Delaware SB 142 amends the procedure for filling city council vacancies.
  • Florida SB 666 makes minor changes to candidate oath forms.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Hawaii HB 1294 requires a candidate's legal name to be included wherever the candidate's name is used when the candidate requests that a different name be printed on the ballot, except that on the ballot only the candidate's requested name will appear.
  • Idaho HB 125 changes the deadline for write-in candidates to file declarations of intent.
  • Illinois SB 2123 amends notice and ballot explanation rules for proposed state constitutional amendments. It also creates a Ranked-Choice Voting Systems Task Force to review the possibility of implementing RCV in 2028. It makes Election Day a state holiday. It also establishes a Security of Remote Vote by Mail Task Force to study the possibility of transmitting ballots electronically. It updates list maintenance procedures and allows 16-year-olds to preregister. It makes minor changes to political party central committee membership composition and nomination procedures. It updates vote center and curbside voting requirements and requires that notice be given of polling location changes occurring close to an election. It requires that constitutional amendments appear on the same ballot as candidate races. It requires election officials to provide the information of voters whose mail ballots are rejected to the State Board of Elections.
  • Illinois HB 351 updates requirements related to notarizing candidate and nomination petitions. It establishes the Task Force to Review Eligibility to Hold Public Office to determine what conduct disqualifies or should disqualify a person from holding public office in the state. It prohibits anyone who commits an "infamous crime" while in public office from holding public office in the state again. 
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Iowa HB 716 designates the task of resolving a tie vote for a state legislative office to the party precinct committees of the district at issue and makes other changes to party committee procedures.
  • Kansas SB 221 updates write-in candidacy filing, election notice and selection processes for election commission procedures. It also updates signature verification rules and requires county election officials to provide voters who submit unsigned ballots notice an opportunity to cure the ballot. It also specifies that voters must apply for an absentee ballot to receive one. It allows poll observers to be present at recounts and audits, in addition to canvasses. It adds constitutional amendment questions to audit procedures when applicable. The bill also allows any voter who voted in an election containing a constitutional amendment to request a recount. It amends the recount request deadline. It allows political parties to decide by Jan. 15 of each year whether they will allow unaffiliated voters to vote in their primaries that year. It amends party precinct chairperson rules and procedures. It adds unauthorized access to voting system equipment and publishing confidential information related to voting systems, poll books, etc. to the list of actions that constitute electronic or electromechanical voting system or electronic poll book fraud and does similarly for optical scanning equipment fraud.
  • Kansas HB 2053 adds presidential primaries to the list of elections subject to certain absentee ballot application, voter registration, and audit procedures. It also establishes primary elections for recognized political parties and clarifies minor nomination procedures. It stipulates that advance voting ballots (absentee ballots) must be received by the close of polls on Election Day in order to be counted.
  • Kentucky HB 302 updates procedures for election irregularity inquiries undertaken by the attorney general and procedures for county board of elections requests to consolidate precincts. The bill also updates prohibitions on electioneering near polling places and procedures for filling vacancies in candidate nominations. It also makes it a felony to vote if a person lost their right to vote by reason of a felony conviction and has not had their rights restored.
  • Louisiana HB 304 prohibits elected officials who resign or retire from filling the vacancy their resignation or retirement creates.
  • Louisiana HB 496 puts the Department of State in charge of mailing registration notices to voters, instead of registrars. It also makes some changes to the process of requesting copies of registrars' records and prohibits them from furnishing copies of registration applications from 16- and 17-year-olds. It also updates the dates for some municipal and special elections. It also creates new procedures for filling vacancies in political party committees, sets an opening date for the presidential primary filing period on the third Wednesday in December, and updates the form of provisional and absentee ballot envelope certificates. It also makes minor updates to absentee ballot voting and tabulation procedures to conform with a new certificate form.
  • Maine SB 328 reduces the enrollment requirement for minor parties to seek official status.
  • Maine SB 393 allows candidates’ home address to be kept confidential in nominating petitions upon written request to the secretary of state.
  • Maine SB 113 clarifies the replacement candidate qualifying period in the event of a candidate's death, withdrawal or disqualification and lays out other requirements for replacement candidates. 
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting.
  • Montana HB 536 requires all candidates to file a declaration of intent.
  • Montana HB 173 requires certification and testing to demonstrate that voting systems are not connected to the internet. It stipulates that anyone who connects a modem or other internet or external communication device to a voting system is guilty of tampering with public records or information.
  • Montana HB 306 prohibits a person from holding civil office in the state if they were not registered to vote in Montana at the time of the candidate filing deadline, unless the reason they were not registered was because they had not yet turned 18. 
  • Montana SB 338 makes a minor update to presidential candidate filing fees. 
  • Montana HB 660 allows vacancy notices to be posted online and removes the requirement that the lieutenant governor receive a physical copy of the notice. 
  • New Jersey AB 5175 makes the secretary of state responsible for post-election audits instead of the attorney general. It also requires candidates to file paperwork 75 days before municipal elections. The bill also prohibits school and fire district elections from taking place in the 45 days before a primary or general election.
  • New Jersey SB 3595 updates deadlines by which state and county level election officials must notify election officials of smaller jurisdictions that candidates and ballot measures have been certified for the ballot. It also updates deadlines by which political party committees must inform counties how many members they will need to elect from the county. It also updates deadlines related to vacancy filings. It requires clerks to have printer-ready versions of ballots on file 60 days before an election.
  • New Jersey SB 3595 updates deadlines by which state and county level election officials must notify election officials of smaller jurisdictions that candidates and ballot measures have been certified for the ballot. It also updates deadlines by which political party committees must inform counties how many members they will need to elect from the county. It also updates deadlines related to vacancy filings. It requires clerks to have printer-ready versions of ballots on file 60 days before an election. 
  • New Mexico SB 180 allows public officials’ home addresses to be confidential, requires the secretary of state to maintain an elections security program, updates clerk guidelines for accepting voter registration, and allows for electronic nominating petition signatures.
  • New York AB 7690 changes the 2024 presidential primary date to April 2 (from Feb. 6), with early voting available from March 23-30. It allows state party committees to determine when and how to select national convention delegates. It establishes some procedures for conducting primaries, selecting delegates, and certification and filing rules for delegates and presidential candidates. It lays out specific presidential primary and delegate selection procedures for the Republican Party and gives other parties the option to follow those same procedures. It stipulates that a ballot returned two to seven days after the election with no postmark can be cured by the voter’s attestation. The bill also prohibits county boards of elections from conducting manual recounts unless they first complete and announce the results of a statutorily required recanvass.
  • North Carolina SB 749 changes the composition of the state and county boards of elections and updates various election board procedures. It stipulates that each board will consist of an even number of members from each of the two major parties. It gives the General Assembly authority over state board appointments, instead of the governor. It gives the General Assembly authority over county board appointments, instead of the state board. It gives the General Assembly authority to appoint the executive director of the state board in the event of a vacancy or if the board fails to appoint its own director. The bill also stipulates that a voter who cannot attach a photocopy of their ID to an absentee ballot may use an alternative affidavit. It also updates economic interest filing rules for candidates and officeholders. Note: Implementation of this law has been stayed by a court.
  • North Dakota SB 2163 requires that ballot measure and amendment summaries be written in plain, everyday language on the ballot.
  • Oklahoma SB 375 moves the state primary to the third Tuesday in June, and requires declarations of candidacy to be filed by 8 a.m. on the first Wednesday in April.
  • Oklahoma SB 677 requires candidate addresses to be kept confidential and requires candidates to submit their voter registration verification form with their declaration of candidacy.
  • Oregon SB 585 allows individuals who become U.S. citizens to file for candidacy as long as they have been a registered member of the party they hope to run for 180 days.
  • Oregon SB 28 creates new filing deadlines, title and summary drafting responsibilities and other requirements for constitutional amendment ballot measures. It also provides procedures for challenging a ballot measure's title in court.
  • Oregon SB 166 establishes a right to vote in state law. It also guarantees the right to a secret ballot and prohibits election officials from disclosing how anyone voted. It requires county election clerks to establish cybersecurity plans. It clarifies that voter information protected by the Address Confidentiality Program will not be subject to public inspection. It makes petition signatures subject to public inspection pursuant to the state's public records laws. It makes largely technical updates to the state's prohibitions on fraudulent activity in the petition circulation process. It makes minor updates to election law violation complaint filing procedures. It makes various updates to candidate filing timelines and petition signature requirements. It requires clerks to file amended abstracts of vote totals 30 days after the election for ballot measures instead of 37 days. It allows absentee voters to pick up their ballot from the county clerk's office starting 43 days before the date of the election and requires that ballots be mailed out by that same deadline. 
  • Rhode Island SB 840 updates various filing deadlines and requirements.
  • Rhode Island SB 1010 sets April 2 as the date for the election of political party delegates to the national party conventions for the 2024 primary election.
  • Rhode Island HB 5462 directs the secretary of state to designate a liaison to the board of elections. It also requires that accessible voting equipment be tested during logic and accuracy testing and establishes other procedures for setting up accessible voting units and ensuring they are compatible with ballots.
  • South Dakota SB 86 makes updates to the statement that individuals running for party precinct committee chair must file.
  • South Dakota SB 102 updates what candidate information the Secretary of State must keep on file.
  • Tennessee HB 772 updates deadlines and procedures for submitting presidential candidates' names to appear on the ballot. It also establishes new disclosure requirements for any compensation that members of the state election commission receive for election-related services.
  • Tennessee SB 1007 requires county election commissioners to use electronic poll books.
  • Texas SB 994 updates who can declare a candidate for state or county office ineligible, for what reasons, and by what deadlines.
  • Texas SB 1661 requires ballot scanning machines to be able to detect modifications to the cast vote record and to reject the cast vote record if a modification is detected.
  • Utah HB 69 updates procedures for notifying candidates and voters when a candidate is disqualified for failing to file campaign finance reports. It allows municipal clerks and the lieutenant governor to receive voter registration applications, in addition to county clerks. It stipulates that for a voter who changes party affiliation between April 1 and the date of a primary election, the new party affiliation will take effect the day after the primary canvass is complete. It requires election officials to post notice of early voting times and places and ballot box locations 28 days before the election instead of 19 days. It requires election officials to publish notice of tabulation machine tests 10 days before the test instead of 48 hours before. It updates various other notice and ballot preparation deadlines. It requires ballot initiative summaries to appear online and on the ballot or the ballot proposition information sheet. It makes minor updates to candidate filing periods. It creates notice and filing requirements for election officials to fulfill when a candidate withdraws from a race.
  • Utah SB 63 clarifies that a vacancy for officeholders includes absence because of death, disability, disqualification, resignation or other cause. For candidates, a vacancy includes absence because of death, resignation or disqualification. It updates procedures for the parties' state central committees when filling a candidate vacancy. 
  • Utah HB 69 updates procedures for notifying candidates and voters when a candidate is disqualified for failing to file campaign finance reports. It allows municipal clerks and the lieutenant governor to receive voter registration applications, in addition to county clerks. It stipulates that for a voter who changes party affiliation between April 1 and the date of a primary election, the new party affiliation will take effect the day after the primary canvass is complete. It requires election officials to post notice of early voting times and places and ballot box locations 28 days before the election instead of 19 days. It requires election officials to publish notice of tabulation machine tests 10 days before the test instead of 48 hours before. It updates various other notice and ballot preparation deadlines. It requires ballot initiative summaries to appear online and on the ballot or the ballot proposition information sheet. It makes minor updates to candidate filing periods. It creates notice and filing requirements for election officials to fulfill when a candidate withdraws from a race. 
  • Washington SB 5182 updates candidate filing deadlines and procedures.
  • Wyoming HB 103 changes the deadline by which voters must declare or change their party affiliation to the same day nomination applications are due for a primary, and to 14 days before a general election.

Cybersecurity and Elections Security
  • Alabama SB 10 prohibits the use of voting machines that are capable of connecting to the internet or cell phone networks.
  • Arkansas HB 1404 lays out procedures for moving election equipment and materials from one early voting polling site to another when each site is only being used for part of the early voting period.
  • Arkansas HB 1487 requires county boards of election commissioners to provide county clerks with ballot count reports including the date absentee ballots were delivered and the names of the individuals who delivered the ballots. The bill also establishes chain of custody procedures for absentee and provisional ballots.
  • Georgia SB 129 requires employees to be provided time off to vote. It also makes updates to local election official performance reviews, absentee ballot application forms, and risk-limiting audit procedures.
  • Maine HB 252 establishes a working group to study polling places at schools to protect security and accessibility.
  • Maine HB 1013 protects physical access to ballot drop boxes.
  • Michigan HB 4697 requires that each city or township have at least one ballot dop box, or one per 15,000 voters distributed equally throughout the jurisdiction. Drop boxes must be open 24 hours per day for 40 days before Election Day. Thirty-five days before the election, ballots must be collected on days that the clerk's office is open by an authorized individual and this must be documented.
  • New Mexico SB 180 allows public officials’ home addresses to be confidential, requires the secretary of state to maintain an elections security program, updates clerk guidelines for accepting voter registration, and allows for electronic nominating petition signatures.
  • Oregon SB 166 establishes a right to vote in state law. It also guarantees the right to a secret ballot and prohibits election officials from disclosing how anyone voted. It requires county election clerks to establish cybersecurity plans. It clarifies that voter information protected by the Address Confidentiality Program will not be subject to public inspection. It makes petition signatures subject to public inspection pursuant to the state's public records laws. It makes largely technical updates to the state's prohibitions on fraudulent activity in the petition circulation process. It makes minor updates to election law violation complaint filing procedures. It makes various updates to candidate filing timelines and petition signature requirements. It requires clerks to file amended abstracts of vote totals 30 days after the election for ballot measures instead of 37 days. It allows absentee voters to pick up their ballot from the county clerk's office starting 43 days before the date of the election and requires that ballots be mailed out by that same deadline. 
  • South Dakota SB 161 appropriates funds for list maintenance, ballot machines, and election security.
  • Texas SB 1661 requires ballot scanning machines to be able to detect modifications to the cast vote record and to reject the cast vote record if a modification is detected.
  • Texas HB 246 directs the secretary of state to establish a pilot program for video monitoring of areas where voted ballots are stored and counted.
  • Utah HB 448 requires election returns to include records of when voters were contacted to cure a ballot. It establishes the lieutenant governor as the state’s chief election officer. It lays out the lieutenant governor's rights and responsibilities and details the relationship between local election officials and the lieutenant governor, including the lieutenant governor’s responsibility to oversee local election officials. It requires the lieutenant governor to develop training for election administrators and workers. It prohibits an individual who worked on an election from auditing their own work and instructs the lieutenant governor to study different audit methods. It also updates voter registration list maintenance procedures, including those related to a voter's change of address. It requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It requires a voter's signature on their return envelope to be "reasonably consistent" with the signature on file. It allows voters with disabilities preventing them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those ballots. It updates notice requirements for notice and cure procedures. It also implements ballot chain of custody procedures. It requires election officers to conduct signature verification audits and ballot reconciliation. It requires results reports to include reconciliation and provisional ballot numbers. It stipulates that only certain government and law enforcement officials may view drop box surveillance footage. 
  • Washington SB 5152 creates a cause of action for candidates who are the subject of "synthetic media," or deep fakes or convincingly/realistically altered electioneering media. Except in certain circumstances, the cause of action will lie against the sponsor of the synthetic media, not the medium or platform on which it appeared.
  • Wyoming SB 153 requires county clerks to conduct post-election audits. It also prohibits electronic voting systems from being connected to the internet. It updates the deadline by which clerks must distribute absentee ballots to non-UOCAVA voters. It also updates ballot chain of custody procedures and requires election judges or peace officers to deliver tabulation results to the county clerk. It allows county clerks to request that ballots be transported to central count centers in the same manner.

Early In-Person Voting
  • Arkansas HB 1198 prohibits early voting from being available on state holidays. Current law prohibits early voting on state and county holidays.
  • Connecticut HB 5004 sets early voting hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Tuesday and Thursday prior to an election. It updates various same day registration and early voting procedures. It also updates procedures related to candidates who withdraw or die before an election is held.
  • Louisiana SB 23 requires that early vote locations must be accessible and conveniently located.
  • Michigan SB 367 implements early voting.
  • Michigan HB 4695 updates requirements and procedures related to early voting election inspectors and early voting sites.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting. 
  • New York SB 6519 requires that all voters be notified five days before the election, or as soon as practicable, if their early voting polling place location changes. It prohibits locations from changing within 48 hours of an early voting period except in an emergency. 
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • Texas HB 1217 applies uniform early voting requirements to all counties. Previously, early voting requirements differed for counties of different sizes. 
  • Utah HB 69 updates procedures for notifying candidates and voters when a candidate is disqualified for failing to file campaign finance reports. It allows municipal clerks and the lieutenant governor to receive voter registration applications, in addition to county clerks. It stipulates that for a voter who changes party affiliation between April 1 and the date of a primary election, the new party affiliation will take effect the day after the primary canvass is complete. It requires election officials to post notice of early voting times and places and ballot box locations 28 days before the election instead of 19 days. It requires election officials to publish notice of tabulation machine tests 10 days before the test instead of 48 hours before. It updates various other notice and ballot preparation deadlines. It requires ballot initiative summaries to appear online and on the ballot or the ballot proposition information sheet. It makes minor updates to candidate filing periods. It creates notice and filing requirements for election officials to fulfill when a candidate withdraws from a race. 

Election Costs and Funding
  • Arkansas SB 255 prohibits election officials from accepting private funding, including services, for election-related expenses. Previously, the law prohibited county boards of elections from accepting funds, grants or gifts from non-government sources.
  • Arkansas HB 1105 appropriates funds to the State Board of Election Commissioners. The bill specifies what the funds can be used for and how the state board can request additional funds.
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Georgia SB 222 prohibits private funding in elections and updates State Election Board structure and procedures.
  • Idaho HB 11 expands the state's ban on government officials and employees accepting or expending over $100 in money or goods from private entities.
  • Minnesota HB 3 allows 16- and 17-year-olds to submit voter registration applications to preregister, and allows for automatic voter registration. The bill also requires the secretary of state to keep a list of voters who vote absentee permanently, and requires the state to provide instructions and sample ballots in languages other than English. It also prohibits intimidation and interference with voters and election officials. It also appropriates money to the secretary of state to implement the programs mentioned in the bill.
  • Montana SB 117 prohibits private funding or donation of other goods and services for the conduct of an election. 
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections.
  • Oklahoma HB 2682 prohibits private funding in elections. It exempts providing polling place locations, election volunteers, food and drink for election workers, office supplies of nominal value, and publishing State Election Board-issued PSAs from the prohibition on private donations. 
  • South Dakota SB 161 appropriates funds for list maintenance, ballot machines, and election security.
  • West Virginia SB 631 extends the State Election Fund and provides no-interest loans to jurisdictions to assist with purchasing HAVA-required electronic voting equipment. It makes some updates to voter registration and related recordkeeping procedures. 

Election Crimes and Law Enforcement
  • Arizona SB 1061 increases protections for public officials and election officials. It allows them to request that certain personal information be kept confidential from public records. It also prohibits “doxxing” election officials and their families – in other words, making personal, private or identifying information available on the internet.
  • Arkansas SB 272 makes it a felony to forge a voter’s signature. It also requires the State Board of Election Commissioners to conduct an election integrity review after each election cycle and lays out the process for that review.
  • Arkansas HB 1464 makes minor changes to the process for filing complaints of election law violations with the State Board of Election Commissioners.
  • Arkansas HB 1513 establishes an Election Integrity Unit in the attorney general’s Office to investigate complaints about election law violations and refer cases to prosecuting authorities when applicable.
  • California SB 485 clarifies that the secretary of state, election officials election staff and poll workers are subject to the state's ban on interfering with election officials and the conduct of an election.
  • California AB 1539 makes it a misdemeanor to vote in an election in California and in another state.
  • Delaware HB 202 makes possession of a firearm at a polling place a misdemeanor.
  • Florida SB 4 authorizes the Office of Statewide Prosecution to investigate and prosecute election and voter registration-related crimes.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Hawaii SB 1541 specifies that voting more than once in any election is election fraud.
  • Idaho HB 239 specifies that it is unlawful for a noncitizen to vote in an election.
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Kansas SB 221 updates write-in candidacy filing, election notice and selection processes for election commission procedures. It also updates signature verification rules and requires county election officials to provide voters who submit unsigned ballots notice an opportunity to cure the ballot. It also specifies that voters must apply for an absentee ballot to receive one. It allows poll observers to be present at recounts and audits, in addition to canvasses. It adds constitutional amendment questions to audit procedures when applicable. The bill also allows any voter who voted in an election containing a constitutional amendment to request a recount. It amends the recount request deadline. It allows political parties to decide by Jan. 15 of each year whether they will allow unaffiliated voters to vote in their primaries that year. It amends party precinct chairperson rules and procedures. It adds unauthorized access to voting system equipment and publishing confidential information related to voting systems, poll books, etc. to the list of actions that constitute electronic or electromechanical voting system or electronic poll book fraud and does similarly for optical scanning equipment fraud.
  • Kentucky HB 302 updates procedures for election irregularity inquiries undertaken by the attorney general and procedures for county board of elections requests to consolidate precincts. The bill also updates prohibitions on electioneering near polling places and procedures for filling vacancies in candidate nominations. It also makes it a felony to vote if a person lost their right to vote by reason of a felony conviction and has not had their rights restored.
  • Maryland HB 410 sets guidelines for new precinct polling places, prohibits voter intimidation and bribery at polling places, and schedules the 2024 primary for the second Tuesday in May.
  • Michigan HB 4696 establishes election crimes that are considered felonies, including signing nominating petitions with multiple names, disclosing early voting results before Election Day, forging signatures on absentee ballots, casting multiple votes and bribing and intimidating voters.
  • Michigan HB 4568 makes it a misdemeanor to, among other things, pay a voter to vote a certain way; accept payment for distributing and collecting absentee ballot applications; fire, or threaten to fire, an employee for voting a certain way; fail to show up to serve as an election inspector once appointed except under certain circumstances; willfully fail to perform a duty ordered by the secretary of state or board of county election commissioners; exchange money to ensure a convention delegate votes for a certain nominee; solicit votes within 100 feet of the entrance to a polling place; gamble on election or nomination results; meet in groups of more than two individuals while voting absentee ballots except for immediate families; or publish or circulate a false, deceptive or malicious statement about a candidate for office without the author's name on the statement.
  • Michigan SB 505 establishes a variety of election related felonies.
  • Michigan HB 4129 makes it a crime to intimidate an election official.
  • Michigan HB 5145 classifies various election related crimes.
  • Minnesota HB 3 allows 16- and 17-year-olds to submit voter registration applications to preregister, and allows for automatic voter registration. The bill also requires the secretary of state to keep a list of voters who vote absentee permanently, and requires the state to provide instructions and sample ballots in languages other than English. It also prohibits intimidation and interference with voters and election officials. It also appropriates money to the secretary of state to implement the programs mentioned in the bill.
  • Minnesota HB 1370 makes it a crime to use deep fake technology to influence an election.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting.
  • Mississippi SB 2358 establishes penalties for violating the state’s prohibition on ballot harvesting.
  • Montana SB 61 establishes that any person who interferes with an election official to obstruct or impair the election or canvass is guilty of obstruction of a public servant.
  • Montana HB 173 requires certification and testing to demonstrate that voting systems are not connected to the internet. It stipulates that anyone who connects a modem or other internet or external communication device to a voting system is guilty of tampering with public records or information.
  • Montana HB 892 outlaws double voting within the state or in two different states. It prohibits being registered to vote in more than one location at a time and requires registrants to provide information about their previous voter registration if they have one.
  • Nevada SB 406 makes it a class E felony to threaten election workers. New Hampshire HB 244 requires clerks to mail ballots to those who request them up until noon on the day before the election. The bill also requires clerks to provide an absentee ballot to voters that show up in person until 5 p.m. on the day before the election.
  • New Mexico SB 43 makes intimidation of any election official or worker a fourth-degree felony offense.
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections.
  • North Carolina SB 406 makes it a felony to threaten or attempt to use force to interfere with an election official's duties or retaliate against them for fulfilling their duties. It also makes it a felony to dox an election official, including if the doxxing results in harm or fear of harm to the election official's close relations.
  • North Dakota SB 2292 makes it unlawful to breach the peace or obstruct a voter or member of an election board on the way to or at a polling place. It requires any person who tells the election inspector they intend to serve as an election observer be allowed to do so. It requires polling places be arranged in a way that allows observers to see and hear goings-on without infringing on voter privacy.
  • Oklahoma SB 410 updates electioneering restrictions in and around polling places.
  • Oklahoma SB 481 prohibits intimidation and impersonation of election officials with a punishment of $1,000 in fines or six months in jail. It also makes it a felony to intentionally damage software or hardware.
  • Texas HB 1243 makes it a felony to vote if ineligible, vote multiple times, vote another person’s ballot, tamper with another person’s ballot, or vote in Texas and in another state in the same federal election.
  • Utah HB 347 makes it a third degree felony to tamper with ballot drop boxes.

Election Officials and Legislative Oversight
  • Arkansas SB 292 increases the amount county board of election commissioners are paid for their work on the board.
  • Arkansas HB 1461 requires all state and county election officials to submit any federal guidance they receive to the secretary of state’s office, which shall provide a report about that guidance to the legislature.
  • Delaware HB 148 requires county directors' offices to provide election districts with election supplies. It requires commissioners to deliver a report containing the number of ballots supplied to each district to the legislature after the election. It also revises absentee ballot pre-processing and tabulation procedures.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Georgia SB 129 requires employees to be provided time off to vote. It also makes updates to local election official performance reviews, absentee ballot application forms, and risk-limiting audit procedures.
  • Georgia SB 222 prohibits private funding in elections and updates State Election Board structure and procedures.
  • Hawaii SB 9 requires members of boards of registration to be registered voters in the county whose board they sit on and requires them to notify the governor and legislature if they change parties while in office.
  • Indiana HB 1335 adds procedures for alternate presidential electors and sets timelines for future elections. It also removes outdated provisions pertaining to term lengths of members of the elections division and revises per diem allowances for election officials who attend elections division meetings.
  • Louisiana SB 16 increases the amount of compensation parish board of election members can receive.
  • Louisiana HB 449 establishes an Americans with Disabilities Act compliance officer within the Secretary of State's office and a Voting Accessibility Advisory Group.
  • Maryland SB 863 removes the requirement that a vote by the State Board to remove the State Administrator of Elections be based on good cause. It also prohibits the state administrator who the State Board voted to remove from continuing to serve in office until a successor is appointed and confirmed.
  • Michigan HB 529 updates appointment procedures for the Board of State Canvassers. It also brings the state into compliance with the federal Electoral Count Reform Act. It lays out procedures related to the state's slate of electors in the event of a recount. It makes mostly minor updates to the primary canvassing process. It allows straight ticket voting. It prohibits rejecting a ballot because an election official failed to do their duties properly. It also updates Board of State Canvassers certification procedures, including what to do in the event a county canvass board fails to certify an election. It makes the duty of the state and county boards of canvassers to certify an election based solely on the election returns nondiscretionary. It removes the legislature's authorization to resolve a tied election. It makes minor updates to the recount filing and hearing timelines. 
  • Montana SB 432 requires the secretary of state to submit an annual report to the legislature on how federal Help America Vote Act funds have been used. 
  • Nevada SB 54 requires the secretary of state to publish an elections procedures manual at least once every two years. It also requires the secretary to develop election procedure trainings for county and city clerks.
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • North Carolina SB 749 changes the composition of the state and county boards of elections and updates various election board procedures. It stipulates that each board will consist of an even number of members from each of the two major parties. It gives the General Assembly authority over state board appointments, instead of the governor. It gives the General Assembly authority over county board appointments, instead of the state board. It gives the General Assembly authority to appoint the executive director of the state board in the event of a vacancy or if the board fails to appoint its own director. The bill also stipulates that a voter who cannot attach a photocopy of their ID to an absentee ballot may use an alternative affidavit. It also updates economic interest filing rules for candidates and officeholders. 
  • Oklahoma SB 481 prohibits intimidation and impersonation of election officials with a punishment of $1,000 in fines or six months in jail. It also makes it a felony to intentionally damage software or hardware.
  • Rhode Island HB 5462 directs the secretary of state to designate a liaison to the board of elections. It also requires that accessible voting equipment be tested during logic and accuracy testing and establishes other procedures for setting up accessible voting units and ensuring they are compatible with ballots.
  • Tennessee HB 772 updates deadlines and procedures for submitting presidential candidates' names to appear on the ballot. It also establishes new disclosure requirements for any compensation that members of the state election commission receive for election-related services.
  • Texas HB 2800 requires county election board meetings to be in person and open to the public. In counties with websites, notice must be posted on the county website 48 hours before the meeting.
  • Utah HB 448 requires election returns to include records of when voters were contacted to cure a ballot. It establishes the lieutenant governor as the state’s chief election officer. It lays out the lieutenant governor's rights and responsibilities and details the relationship between local election officials and the lieutenant governor, including the lieutenant governor’s responsibility to oversee local election officials. It requires the lieutenant governor to develop training for election administrators and workers. It prohibits an individual who worked on an election from auditing their own work and instructs the lieutenant governor to study different audit methods. It also updates voter registration list maintenance procedures, including those related to a voter's change of address. It requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It requires a voter's signature on their return envelope to be "reasonably consistent" with the signature on file. It allows voters with disabilities preventing them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those ballots. It updates notice requirements for notice and cure procedures. It also implements ballot chain of custody procedures. It requires election officers to conduct signature verification audits and ballot reconciliation. It requires results reports to include reconciliation and provisional ballot numbers. It stipulates that only certain government and law enforcement officials may view drop box surveillance footage. 

Electoral College
  • California SB 507 brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that presidential electors meet and vote on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. It also requires the governor to designate an alternative location for the electors to meet in the event that a state of emergency renders it unsafe to meet in the capitol.
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Delaware SB 57 adopts the Uniform Faithful Presidential Electors Act, requiring electors to vote for the candidates of the party that nominated the electors and establishing other Electoral College procedures.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Hawaii SB 141 adopts the Uniform Faithful Presidential Electors Act requiring electors to vote for the candidates nominated by their party and updates procedures for elector voting and filling elector vacancies.
  • Indiana HB 1335 adds procedures for alternate presidential electors and sets timelines for future elections. It also removes outdated provisions pertaining to term lengths of members of the elections division and revises per diem allowances for election officials who attend elections division meetings.
  • Kansas HB 2087 makes political parties responsible for selecting and submitting their presidential electors, instead of caucuses and state party committees.
  • Michigan HB 529 updates appointment procedures for the Board of State Canvassers. It also brings the state into compliance with the federal Electoral Count Reform Act. It lays out procedures related to the state's slate of electors in the event of a recount. It makes mostly minor updates to the primary canvassing process. It allows straight ticket voting. It prohibits rejecting a ballot because an election official failed to do their duties properly. It also updates Board of State Canvassers certification procedures, including what to do in the event a county canvass board fails to certify an election. It makes the duty of the state and county boards of canvassers to certify an election based solely on the election returns nondiscretionary. It removes the legislature's authorization to resolve a tied election. It makes minor updates to the recount filing and hearing timelines.
  • New York SB 438 requires presidential electors to vote for the candidate nominated by their party. It stipulates that an elector who fails to do so has resigned as an elector, and their vote will not be counted. It requires each elector's ballot to have their name on it. 
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • North Dakota HB 1192 allows mail ballot precinct election boards to begin scanning mail ballots three business days before the election. It also brings the state into compliance with the federal Electoral Count Reform Act by updating the date on which presidential electors meet. It extends the deadline by which county auditors must deliver the certified abstract to the secretary of state from the 8th day after the election to the 13th day.
  • South Carolina SB 405 brings the state into compliance with the federal Electoral Count Reform Act's date and security feature requirements.
  • Texas HB 87 requires presidential electors to vote for the candidate nominated by their party, including a replacement candidate selected by their party. It also establishes procedures for installing substitute electors in the event of a vacancy.

Felon Voting Rights
  • Michigan HB 4983 updates automatic voter registration procedures. It stipulates under what circumstances a state agency may become a voter registration agency and how those agencies will collaborate with the secretary of state. It establishes procedures for Indian nations or tribes to request to work with the state to register voters. It also requires the department of corrections to automatically register individuals to vote upon release from incarceration. 
  • Minnesota HB 28 restores voting rights to felons who have completed their incarcerated sentence. The bill requires correctional facilities to inform individuals of this right and to provide voter registration applications upon release.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting. 
  • New Mexico HB 4 restores voting rights to citizens on parole, updates automatic voter registration provisions to include all state agencies, and creates guidelines for polling places on Tribal lands.
  • New York AB 4009 requires correctional facilities to distribute voting rights information and a registration form to individuals over the age of 18 when they are released from custody. Corrections officials must keep a list of anyone who declines the registration form. 
  • Wyoming SB 120 provides that a person who has lost the right to vote by reason of a felony conviction will have their right to vote restored five years after they complete their sentence, including probation and parole.

Polling Places, Poll Workers and Poll Watchers
  • Alabama HB 71 gives the Houston County Appointment Board the authority to appoint election inspectors from the total number of poll workers in the county. The bill also increases compensation for poll workers and inspectors.
  • Alabama HB 435 increases the amounts election clerks and inspectors are paid.
  • Arkansas SB 273 requires that vote centers remain at the same location from election to election unless the county board of election commissioners issues an order changing the location. The law prohibits county boards from changing vote center locations less than 60 days before a primary or general election, as opposed to the current limit of 30 days, except in limited circumstances. 
  • Arkansas HB 1325 requires that if a county board of election commissioners chooses to add early vote polling sites beyond the county’s main designated site, the hours at the additional polling sites must be the same as or as similar as possible to the hours at the designated vote site.
  • Arkansas HB 1404 lays out procedures for moving election equipment and materials from one early voting polling site to another when each site is only being used for part of the early voting period.
  • Arkansas HB 1457 lays out poll watchers’ rights and related procedures.
  • California AB 545 requires polling places to make specified assistive technology available to voters with disabilities. It eliminates the requirement that a voter make a declaration under oath to receive assistance. It allows curbside voters to vote a regular ballot instead of a mail-in ballot and otherwise expands curbside voting options. 
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Connecticut HB 5004 sets early voting hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Tuesday and Thursday prior to an election. It updates various same day registration and early voting procedures. It also updates procedures related to candidates who withdraw or die before an election is held.
  • Connecticut HB 7001 updates tabulation equipment requirements. It gives party representatives the right to view ballots during recanvassing and authorizes election officials to remove from the premises individuals who disturb recanvass procedures and have no right to participate in the procedures. 
  • Illinois SB 2123 amends notice and ballot explanation rules for proposed state constitutional amendments. It also creates a Ranked-Choice Voting Systems Task Force to review the possibility of implementing RCV in 2028. It makes Election Day a state holiday. It also establishes a Security of Remote Vote by Mail Task Force to study the possibility of transmitting ballots electronically. It updates list maintenance procedures and allows 16-year-olds to preregister. It makes minor changes to political party central committee membership composition and nomination procedures. It updates vote center and curbside voting requirements and requires that notice be given of polling location changes occurring close to an election. It requires that constitutional amendments appear on the same ballot as candidate races. It requires election officials to provide the information of voters whose mail ballots are rejected to the State Board of Elections.
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Kansas SB 221 updates write-in candidacy filing, election notice and selection processes for election commission procedures. It also updates signature verification rules and requires county election officials to provide voters who submit unsigned ballots notice an opportunity to cure the ballot. It also specifies that voters must apply for an absentee ballot to receive one. It allows poll observers to be present at recounts and audits, in addition to canvasses. It adds constitutional amendment questions to audit procedures when applicable. The bill also allows any voter who voted in an election containing a constitutional amendment to request a recount. It amends the recount request deadline. It allows political parties to decide by Jan. 15 of each year whether they will allow unaffiliated voters to vote in their primaries that year. It amends party precinct chairperson rules and procedures. It adds unauthorized access to voting system equipment and publishing confidential information related to voting systems, poll books, etc. to the list of actions that constitute electronic or electromechanical voting system or electronic poll book fraud and does similarly for optical scanning equipment fraud.
  • Kentucky HB 302 updates procedures for election irregularity inquiries undertaken by the attorney general and procedures for county board of elections requests to consolidate precincts. The bill also updates prohibitions on electioneering near polling places and procedures for filling vacancies in candidate nominations. It also makes it a felony to vote if a person lost their right to vote by reason of a felony conviction and has not had their rights restored.
  • Louisiana HB 449 establishes an Americans with Disabilities Act compliance officer within the Secretary of State's office and a Voting Accessibility Advisory Group.
  • Maine HB 252 establishes a working group to study polling places at schools to protect security and accessibility.
  • Maine SB 376 places restrictions on candidates’ speech, clothing, buttons and other items at polling places.
  • Maryland HB 410 sets guidelines for new precinct polling places, prohibits voter intimidation and bribery at polling places, and schedules the 2024 primary for the second Tuesday in May.
  • Maryland HB 1200 requires that first-time election judges be paid $250 per day and those who have been an election judge before be paid at least an additional $100. Each election judge shall be paid $50 for each training course they complete, and the state will reimburse the local office for this cost.
  • Michigan SB 385 updates the precinct election inspector application and qualification process.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting.
  • Mississippi SB 2353 specifies poll worker compensation amounts.
  • Nevada AB 192 outlines guidelines for recount requests, allows the secretary of state to prescribe the type and color of mail ballots, and requires clerks to post a sign stating that electioneering is prohibited at polling places.
  • Nevada SB 216 requires clerks to schedule meetings with Native American tribes to discuss establishment and operation of polling places by Aug. 1 in an odd year. The bill also allows voters with disabilities, Tribal members, and overseas and military voters to receive and submit their ballots though an approved electronic system.
  • New Mexico HB 4 restores voting rights to citizens on parole, updates automatic voter registration provisions to include all state agencies, and creates guidelines for polling places on Tribal lands.
  • New York SB 587 requires county boards of elections to conduct election worker training programs at least quarterly. It also directs the State Board of Elections to develop and implement a statewide training program that enables individuals to become certified poll worker trainers. It requires each county board of elections to enroll at least two individuals in that program on a bipartisan basis. It requires certified trainers to attend continuing education programs once every two years. The bill provides a non-exhaustive list of topics that should be covered in election worker training. 
  • North Dakota HB 1167 prohibits executive orders that suspend or amend laws or regulations related to minimum numbers of polling places.
  • North Dakota SB 2292 makes it unlawful to breach the peace or obstruct a voter or member of an election board on the way to or at a polling place. It requires any person who tells the election inspector they intend to serve as an election observer be allowed to do so. It requires polling places be arranged in a way that allows observers to see and hear goings-on without infringing on voter privacy.
  • Oklahoma SB 266 increases the minimum number of voters required for a precinct to be considered a subprecinct to 1,500 voters.
  • Oklahoma SB 290 increases compensation for election inspectors, judges and clerks. 
  • Oklahoma SB 410 updates electioneering restrictions in and around polling places.
  • Rhode Island SB 613 and HB 6240 require cities and towns to consider a uniform list of factors when selecting the location of polling places, including accessibility to specified communities and populations and maximizing voter participation. 
  • Tennessee HB 937 makes a minor update to state law related to voting centers.
  • Tennessee SB 477 sets voting center requirements for counties based on their population.
  • Texas SB 924 amends the circumstances under which precincts can be combined.
  • Texas HB 1631 makes minor updates to poll watcher hours.
  • Texas HB 1632 adds training requirements for election judges, early voting ballot boards, signature verification committees, and counting station members.
  • Texas SB 477 requires election officials to allow voters with mobility impairments to vote before people without such disabilities who are already in line. It also establishes curbside voting. It requires that early voting and absentee ballot applications be able to be filled out online before being printed and submitted.
  • Texas SB 1052 allows election judges and clerks to be paid for up to two hours of work before polls open, instead of one hour.

Post-Election Processes
  • Arkansas SB 250 makes changes to the state’s ballot counting process by requiring the use of tabulation machines to count all paper ballots. It requires all paper ballots to be compatible with the vote tabulation machines selected by the secretary of state. The bill requires all ballots to be run through vote tabulation machines before being counted by hand. Any county that chooses to use paper ballots instead of voting machines is responsible for the cost of ensuring the paper ballots are compatible with tabulation machines. The bill also requires counties to declare preliminary, unofficial election results within 24 hours of polls closing.
  • Arkansas SB 272 makes it a felony to forge a voter’s signature. It also requires the State Board of Election Commissioners to conduct an election integrity review after each election cycle and lays out the process for that review.
  • Arkansas HB 1423 requires a county board of elections conducting a recount to recount all ballots cast in the race at issue and review any duplicated ballots for accuracy. The bill eliminates requirements related to the use of voter-verified paper audit trails and machine-produced paper records in recounts.
  • California AB 63 requires election officials to update results information on their website at least once per week after an election until a certified statement of results is published. The information must include election results, numbers of processed and outstanding ballots, and a schedule for further updates. 
  • California AB 969 prohibits hand counting ballots except in limited circumstances. It requires the use of certified voting machines for tabulation. It requires jurisdictions to finalize contracts for a new certified voting system before terminating a contract with a different certified voting system. 
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Connecticut HB 7001 updates tabulation equipment requirements. It gives party representatives the right to view ballots during recanvassing and authorizes election officials to remove from the premises individuals who disturb recanvass procedures and have no right to participate in the procedures.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Idaho HB 1 requires post-election audits to include hand recounts of selected ballots.
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Kansas SB 221 updates write-in candidacy filing, election notice and selection processes for election commission procedures. It also updates signature verification rules and requires county election officials to provide voters who submit unsigned ballots notice an opportunity to cure the ballot. It also specifies that voters must apply for an absentee ballot to receive one. It allows poll observers to be present at recounts and audits, in addition to canvasses. It adds constitutional amendment questions to audit procedures when applicable. The bill also allows any voter who voted in an election containing a constitutional amendment to request a recount. It amends the recount request deadline. It allows political parties to decide by Jan. 15 of each year whether they will allow unaffiliated voters to vote in their primaries that year. It amends party precinct chairperson rules and procedures. It adds unauthorized access to voting system equipment and publishing confidential information related to voting systems, poll books, etc. to the list of actions that constitute electronic or electromechanical voting system or electronic poll book fraud and does similarly for optical scanning equipment fraud.
  • Kansas HB 2053 adds presidential primaries to the list of elections subject to certain absentee ballot application, voter registration, and audit procedures. It also establishes primary elections for recognized political parties and clarifies minor nomination procedures. It stipulates that advance voting ballots (absentee ballots) must be received by the close of polls on Election Day in order to be counted.
  • Maine SB 809 changes the process to register to vote for individuals who are in the Address Confidentiality Program, requires the secretary of state to establish rules regarding an online voter registration system by Feb. 1, 2024, and requires them to post a complete vote cast record as soon as results are certified. The secretary of state may adopt rules for absentee ballot inspection before they are processed.
  • Maryland SB 287 requires the State Board of Elections to publish election results online and sort results by vote type.
  • Maryland HB 509 requires the State Board of Elections to publish election results online and sorted by vote type.
  • Michigan HB 529 updates appointment procedures for the Board of State Canvassers. It also brings the state into compliance with the federal Electoral Count Reform Act. It lays out procedures related to the state's slate of electors in the event of a recount. It makes mostly minor updates to the primary canvassing process. It allows straight ticket voting. It prohibits rejecting a ballot because an election official failed to do their duties properly. It also updates Board of State Canvassers certification procedures, including what to do in the event a county canvass board fails to certify an election. It makes the duty of the state and county boards of canvassers to certify an election based solely on the election returns nondiscretionary. It removes the legislature's authorization to resolve a tied election. It makes minor updates to the recount filing and hearing timelines.
  • Michigan SB 570 instructs the secretary of state to oversee audits. It prohibits clerks or other individuals who are officers or precinct delegates for political parties from conducting audits.
  • Michigan SB 590 clarifies that absentee ballot application deadlines and deadlines for challenging presidential election results will not be adjusted if they fall on weekends or holidays.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting.
  • Mississippi HB 1310 establishes funding and procedures for post-election audits in all counties. The bill also requires the secretary of state to compare voter lists with DMV lists to ensure noncitizens are not on the voter rolls.
  • Montana SB 254 removes an exemption from a post-election audit for counties that tabulate their votes by hand.
  • Montana HB 172 authorizes boards of county commissioners to request random-sample audits of vote-counting machines after non-federal elections. It also makes minor updates to the law governing post-election audits of federal elections.
  • Montana HB 196 requires election officials to continue tabulating ballots from the time they start until they have tabulated all ballots that can legally be counted. It requires them to post results by 8 p.m. on Election Day and at least once every three hours thereafter until tabulation is complete. It requires immediate declaration of the result of the election once tabulation is complete. It requires that all aspects of ballot counting be open to public observation. It stipulates that any results from counting before Election Day may not be released until the end of Election Day.
  • Montana SB 197 updates the number of ballots and races that must be included in a post-election random-sample audit.
  • Nevada AB 192 outlines guidelines for recount requests, allows the secretary of state to prescribe the type and color of mail ballots, and requires clerks to post a sign stating that electioneering is prohibited at polling places.
  • New Jersey AB 5175 makes the secretary of state responsible for post-election audits instead of the attorney general. It also requires candidates to file paperwork 75 days before municipal elections. The bill also prohibits school and fire district elections from taking place in the 45 days before a primary or general election.
  • New Jersey AB 5176 requires county clerks to post unofficial election results to their website by 11 p.m. on Election Day and 9 p.m. every day after.
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • North Dakota HB 1192 allows mail ballot precinct election boards to begin scanning mail ballots three business days before the election. It also brings the state into compliance with the federal Electoral Count Reform Act by updating the date on which presidential electors meet. It extends the deadline by which county auditors must deliver the certified abstract to the secretary of state from the 8th day after the election to the 13th day. 
  • Oregon SB 53 prohibits a member of a candidate's household from being employed to handle and count ballots. It stipulates that only people who are authorized to count ballots may conduct signature verification.
  • Oregon SB 166 establishes a right to vote in state law. It also guarantees the right to a secret ballot and prohibits election officials from disclosing how anyone voted. It requires county election clerks to establish cybersecurity plans. It clarifies that voter information protected by the Address Confidentiality Program will not be subject to public inspection. It makes petition signatures subject to public inspection pursuant to the state's public records laws. It makes largely technical updates to the state's prohibitions on fraudulent activity in the petition circulation process. It makes minor updates to election law violation complaint filing procedures. It makes various updates to candidate filing timelines and petition signature requirements. It requires clerks to file amended abstracts of vote totals 30 days after the election for ballot measures instead of 37 days. It allows absentee voters to pick up their ballot from the county clerk's office starting 43 days before the date of the election and requires that ballots be mailed out by that same deadline.
  • Rhode Island HB 5462 directs the secretary of state to designate a liaison to the board of elections. It also requires that accessible voting equipment be tested during logic and accuracy testing and establishes other procedures for setting up accessible voting units and ensuring they are compatible with ballots.
  • South Dakota SB 160 requires county auditing boards to conduct post-election audits. It requires the secretary of state’s office to reimburse counties for the cost of the audits.
  • South Dakota HB 1062 clarifies when recount boards must convene for recounts of primary elections.
  • South Dakota HB 1114 amends the composition of recount boards.
  • Texas SB 1933 authorizes the secretary of state to investigate and order administrative oversight of elections in a county with a population of over 4 million under certain circumstances. It also updates procedures for secretary of state audits of counties.
  • Texas HB 5180 requires counties to make images of voted ballots or cast vote records available for public inspection after canvassing is complete. It requires actual voted ballots to be made available for public inspection later, with PII redacted.
  • Utah HB 269 requires the Legislative Auditor General to audit the state's election system every even-numbered year. Audits may encompass everything from voter registration and candidate filing to the conduct of elections.
  • Utah HB 448 requires election returns to include records of when voters were contacted to cure a ballot. It establishes the lieutenant governor as the state’s chief election officer. It lays out the lieutenant governor's rights and responsibilities and details the relationship between local election officials and the lieutenant governor, including the lieutenant governor’s responsibility to oversee local election officials. It requires the lieutenant governor to develop training for election administrators and workers. It prohibits an individual who worked on an election from auditing their own work and instructs the lieutenant governor to study different audit methods. It also updates voter registration list maintenance procedures, including those related to a voter's change of address. It requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It requires a voter's signature on their return envelope to be "reasonably consistent" with the signature on file. It allows voters with disabilities preventing them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those ballots. It updates notice requirements for notice and cure procedures. It also implements ballot chain of custody procedures. It requires election officers to conduct signature verification audits and ballot reconciliation. It requires results reports to include reconciliation and provisional ballot numbers. It stipulates that only certain government and law enforcement officials may view drop box surveillance footage. 
  • Virginia HB 2266 directs the State Board of Elections to adopt policies for counting and reporting absentee ballots and early in-person absentee ballots.
  • Virginia HB 2324 directs the State Board of Elections to adopt policies governing recounts in elections where more than one individual can be elected to the office.
  • Wisconsin SB 283 requires live canvassing broadcasts to be recorded.
  • Wyoming SB 153 requires county clerks to conduct post-election audits. It also prohibits electronic voting systems from being connected to the internet. It updates the deadline by which clerks must distribute absentee ballots to non-UOCAVA voters. It also updates ballot chain of custody procedures and requires election judges or peace officers to deliver tabulation results to the county clerk. It allows county clerks to request that ballots be transported to central count centers in the same manner.

Primaries
  • Alabama HB 339 schedules the second runoff or primary election of 2024 for the third Tuesday in April.
  • California AB 292 updates procedures related to whether and how unaffiliated voters can vote in a party's presidential or other partisan primary. 
  • Delaware SB 149 changes the presidential primary date from the fourth Tuesday in April to the first Tuesday in April.
  • Idaho HB 138 disaggregates state primary election rules from presidential primary rules, which were previously regulated by the same statutes.
  • Kansas SB 221 updates write-in candidacy filing, election notice and selection processes for election commission procedures. It also updates signature verification rules and requires county election officials to provide voters who submit unsigned ballots notice an opportunity to cure the ballot. It also specifies that voters must apply for an absentee ballot to receive one. It allows poll observers to be present at recounts and audits, in addition to canvasses. It adds constitutional amendment questions to audit procedures when applicable. The bill also allows any voter who voted in an election containing a constitutional amendment to request a recount. It amends the recount request deadline. It allows political parties to decide by Jan. 15 of each year whether they will allow unaffiliated voters to vote in their primaries that year. It amends party precinct chairperson rules and procedures. It adds unauthorized access to voting system equipment and publishing confidential information related to voting systems, poll books, etc. to the list of actions that constitute electronic or electromechanical voting system or electronic poll book fraud and does similarly for optical scanning equipment fraud.
  • Kansas HB 2053 adds presidential primaries to the list of elections subject to certain absentee ballot application, voter registration, and audit procedures. It also establishes primary elections for recognized political parties and clarifies minor nomination procedures. It stipulates that advance voting ballots (absentee ballots) must be received by the close of polls on Election Day in order to be counted.
  • Louisiana HB 496 puts the Department of State in charge of mailing registration notices to voters, instead of registrars. It also makes some changes to the process of requesting copies of registrars' records and prohibits them from furnishing copies of registration applications from 16- and 17-year-olds. It also updates the dates for some municipal and special elections. It also creates new procedures for filling vacancies in political party committees, sets an opening date for the presidential primary filing period on the third Wednesday in December, and updates the form of provisional and absentee ballot envelope certificates. It also makes minor updates to absentee ballot voting and tabulation procedures to conform with a new certificate form.
  • Maryland SB 379 requires county boards of elections to send absentee ballots to voters who qualify and request one no later than 43 days before an election. The bill also allows voters to track and cure their ballot. It also allows election officials to begin processing ballots eight days before Election Day.
  • Maryland HB 410 sets guidelines for new precinct polling places, prohibits voter intimidation and bribery at polling places, and schedules the 2024 primary for the second Tuesday in May.
  • Maryland HB 535 requires county boards of elections to send absentee ballots to voters who qualify and request one no later than 43 days before an election. The bill also allows voters to track and cure their ballot. It also allows election officials to begin processing ballots 8 days before Election Day.
  • Michigan SB 13 establishes the presidential primary date as the last Tuesday in February. It also prohibits a party from participating in the primary if they received less than 5% of the vote in the last presidential election.
  • New York SB 1327 requires that voter changes of address must be received 15 days prior to Election Day, applications must be received 10 days or be postmarked 15 days prior to Election Day, and voters must be enrolled in a party no later than 10 days before a primary to vote in that party's primary.
  • New York AB 7690 changes the 2024 presidential primary date to April 2 (from Feb. 6), with early voting available from March 23-30. It allows state party committees to determine when and how to select national convention delegates. It establishes some procedures for conducting primaries, selecting delegates, and certification and filing rules for delegates and presidential candidates. It lays out specific presidential primary and delegate selection procedures for the Republican Party and gives other parties the option to follow those same procedures. It stipulates that a ballot returned two to seven days after the election with no postmark can be cured by the voter’s attestation. The bill also prohibits county boards of elections from conducting manual recounts unless they first complete and announce the results of a statutorily required recanvass. 
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • Oklahoma SB 375 moves the state primary to the third Tuesday in June, and requires declarations of candidacy to be filed by 8 a.m. on the first Wednesday in April.
  • Rhode Island SB 601 changes the date by which special election primaries and some municipal primaries must be held.
  • Rhode Island HB 5055 allows individuals who will turn 18 years old by the next general election but are not 18 at the time of the primary to vote in the primary.
  • Rhode Island HB 6033 changes the date by which special election primaries and some municipal primaries must be held. Same as RI SB 601.
  • Rhode Island SB 35 allows an individual who will turn 18 by the next general election to vote in the primary election.
  • Rhode Island SB 130 and HB 5305 require public schools to close on presidential preference primary dates.
  • Rhode Island HB 6309 sets the 2024 presidential primary date to April 2.
  • Tennessee SB 978 requires that a sign be posted at each primary election polling place informing voters that it is a crime to vote in a party's primary if the voter is not a member of that party, or to "declare allegiance" to the party without actually intending to affiliate with it.
  • Utah HB 365 sets the deadline to change party affiliation as the day after the declaration of candidacy deadline in a presidential election year and as April 1 in other years. If a voter files a change of affiliation between that deadline and the date of a primary election, the bill stipulates that the change of affiliation takes effect after the primary canvass is complete. It also explicitly prohibits voting in more than one party's presidential primary. 

Ranked-Choice/Instant Runoff Voting
  • California AB 1227 authorizes Santa Clara County to use ranked choice voting in some elections.
  • Idaho HB 179 prohibits ranked choice voting.
  • Illinois SB 2123 amends notice and ballot explanation rules for proposed state constitutional amendments. It also creates a Ranked-Choice Voting Systems Task Force to review the possibility of implementing RCV in 2028. It makes Election Day a state holiday. It also establishes a Security of Remote Vote by Mail Task Force to study the possibility of transmitting ballots electronically. It updates list maintenance procedures and allows 16-year-olds to preregister. It makes minor changes to political party central committee membership composition and nomination procedures. It updates vote center and curbside voting requirements and requires that notice be given of polling location changes occurring close to an election. It requires that constitutional amendments appear on the same ballot as candidate races. It requires election officials to provide the information of voters whose mail ballots are rejected to the State Board of Elections.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting. 
  • Montana HB 598 prohibits ranked choice voting.
  • South Dakota SB 55 prohibits ranked choice voting.
  • South Dakota HB 1112 requires that a runoff election be held if no candidate receives 35% of the vote in a congressional or gubernatorial election with three or more candidates.

Voter ID
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Idaho HB 124 removes student IDs from the state's list of acceptable voter IDs.
  • Idaho HB 340 updates various voter registration procedures, including rules regarding photo ID, same day registration, party affiliation and mail registration.
  • Michigan SB 373 defines several election code terms, including defining “identification for election purposes” to include a driver’s license or other state-issued ID card, a passport or federally-issued ID card, a military ID, a tribal ID, a local government ID, or a student ID.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting. 
  • Nebraska L 514 requires voter ID to cast a ballot or receive a mail-in ballot. It allows voters to use state, federal, tribal, or assisted-living photo IDs as a voter ID. It allows voters without ID to fill out a “reasonable impediment” certification or a provisional voter ID verification form under penalty of election falsification. A voter who uses a provisional must present ID or a reasonable impediment form on or before the Tuesday after the election. It provides that state ID cards will be issued free of charge to anyone who does not have a driver's license and is requesting the ID for voting purposes. It provides that birth certificate copies will be issued free of charge if requested for the purpose of applying for voter ID. It requires the secretary of state to publish voter ID instructions. It also requires the Secretary to verify voters' citizenship status and prohibits the secretary of state from allowing the citizenship information it collects for list maintenance from being used for any other purposes, including law enforcement. It requires clerks to mail voter instructions with mail ballots. 
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • North Carolina SB 749 changes the composition of the state and county boards of elections and updates various election board procedures. It stipulates that each board will consist of an even number of members from each of the two major parties. It gives the General Assembly authority over state board appointments, instead of the governor. It gives the General Assembly authority over county board appointments, instead of the state board. It gives the General Assembly authority to appoint the executive director of the state board in the event of a vacancy or if the board fails to appoint its own director. The bill also stipulates that a voter who cannot attach a photocopy of their ID to an absentee ballot may use an alternative affidavit. It also updates economic interest filing rules for candidates and officeholders. 
  • Oklahoma SB 377 requires voter identification cards to be mailed to voters and allows voters who cancel their registration to reapply in 60 days. The bill also cancels the registration of individuals who have been dismissed from jury duty for not being a U.S. citizen and requires county clerks to send a list of these individuals to the state board of elections each month.
  • Washington SB 5208 adds forms of IDs voters can use to register online and allows registrants to submit a signature in the online registration platform.
  • Wyoming HB 79 adds state concealed carry permits to the list of acceptable voter ID.
  • Wyoming HB 279 adds a voter ID requirement to voters obtaining absentee ballots in person.

Voter Registration and List Maintenance
  • Arkansas HB 1407 directs the secretary of state to establish list maintenance procedures, including comparing data with other states and the Social Security Administration database. The bill requires the State Board of Election Commissioners to audit voter registration data every year. It also requires third party voter registration organizations to inform registration applicants that they can mail the application in themselves and that the organization may be unable to deliver the application on time. 
  • Colorado SB 276 allows state sanctioned digital IDs to serve as a voter ID. The bill also creates new processes for registering voters and providing voter service and polling centers on Indian reservations. The bill also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act's requirement that presidential electors meet on the first Tuesday after the second Wednesday in December. The bill also makes changes to the candidate and initiative petition approval processes with the Secretary of State's office. The bill also makes changes to election funding, including requiring the state to reimburse each county for a portion of each election. It makes some changes to voting machine, election judge, and poll watcher procedures. It allows voters to take cell phones into polling centers and use them for limited purposes. It updates drop box ballot collection procedures. It updates ballot cure procedures, jail voting procedures, and recount procedures.
  • Connecticut HB 5004 sets early voting hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Tuesday and Thursday prior to an election. It updates various same day registration and early voting procedures. It also updates procedures related to candidates who withdraw or die before an election is held.
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Idaho HB 340 updates various voter registration procedures, including rules regarding photo ID, same day registration, party affiliation and mail registration.
  • Illinois SB 2123 amends notice and ballot explanation rules for proposed state constitutional amendments. It also creates a Ranked-Choice Voting Systems Task Force to review the possibility of implementing RCV in 2028. It makes Election Day a state holiday. It also establishes a Security of Remote Vote by Mail Task Force to study the possibility of transmitting ballots electronically. It updates list maintenance procedures and allows 16-year-olds to preregister. It makes minor changes to political party central committee membership composition and nomination procedures. It updates vote center and curbside voting requirements and requires that notice be given of polling location changes occurring close to an election. It requires that constitutional amendments appear on the same ballot as candidate races. It requires election officials to provide the information of voters whose mail ballots are rejected to the State Board of Elections.
  • Indiana HB 1334 updates absentee ballot request ID requirements and prohibits election officials from providing a voter with an absentee ballot application unless requested. It also requires the Bureau of Motor Vehicles to provide the voter registration system with driver's license and other information every day for list maintenance.
  • Indiana HB 1336 makes mostly minor updates to candidate, petition, ballot design and campaign finance filing requirements. It also updates county election board meeting procedures and election and NVRA complaint and investigation reporting procedures. It expands the classes of election workers who are subject to civil penalties for refusing to perform their duties. It also allows candidates and their relatives to serve as precinct election officers in limited circumstances. It makes some updates to the state's list maintenance, voter registration and absentee voting procedures, including signature update options and requiring counties to investigate voter registration records that include an address that may not be a residential address. It also creates new sample ballot procedures. It stipulates that a voter's status as an overseas voter, military voter, or voter with print disabilities expires at the end of the year in which the status request was made. It requires absentee ballots to be printed on security paper after 2024. It also updates post-election audit procedures, recount procedures, and procedures to ensure equipment is working properly before voting begins.
  • Louisiana HB 316 establishes the first Tuesday after the first Monday in May as Louisiana High School Seniors Voter Registration Day.
  • Louisiana HB 496 puts the Department of State in charge of mailing registration notices to voters, instead of registrars. It also makes some changes to the process of requesting copies of registrars' records and prohibits them from furnishing copies of registration applications from 16- and 17-year-olds. It also updates the dates for some municipal and special elections. It also creates new procedures for filling vacancies in political party committees, sets an opening date for the presidential primary filing period on the third Wednesday in December, and updates the form of provisional and absentee ballot envelope certificates. It also makes minor updates to absentee ballot voting and tabulation procedures to conform with a new certificate form.
  • Maine SB 809 changes the process to register to vote for individuals who are in the Address Confidentiality Program, requires the secretary of state to establish rules regarding an online voter registration system by Feb. 1, 2024, and requires them to post a complete vote cast record as soon as results are certified. The secretary of state may adopt rules for absentee ballot inspection before they are processed.
  • Maine HB 858 allows automatic and online registration applications to be received up to seven days before the election.
  • Michigan HB 4567 removes the requirement that an individual who registers to vote within 14 days of an election vote a challenged ballot, allowing them to vote a regular ballot instead. 
  • Michigan SB 594 allows voters to register online using a state ID or the last four digits of their Social Security number instead of requiring both. It updates procedures for verifying voter ID during the online voter registration process. 
  • Michigan HB 4569 updates voter registration procedures and establishes preregistration for 16-year- olds. It also updates some procedures related to upkeep of the state voter file. 
  • Michigan HB 4983 updates automatic voter registration procedures. It stipulates under what circumstances a state agency may become a voter registration agency and how those agencies will collaborate with the secretary of state. It establishes procedures for Indian nations or tribes to request to work with the state to register voters. It also requires the department of corrections to automatically register individuals to vote upon release from incarceration. 
  • Michigan HB 4984 updates procedures related to registering to vote when applying for a driver’s license.  
  • Michigan HB 4985 lays out procedures for registering to vote while applying for a state-issued ID card. 
  • Minnesota HB 3 allows 16- and 17-year-olds to submit voter registration applications to preregister, and allows for automatic voter registration. The bill also requires the secretary of state to keep a list of voters who vote absentee permanently, and requires the state to provide instructions and sample ballots in languages other than English. It also prohibits intimidation and interference with voters and election officials. It also appropriates money to the secretary of state to implement the programs mentioned in the bill.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting. 
  • Mississippi HB 1310 establishes funding and procedures for post-election audits in all counties. The bill also requires the secretary of state to compare voter lists with DMV lists to ensure noncitizens are not on the voter rolls.
  • Montana SB 498 requires that absentee ballot lists be used in annual voter list maintenance procedures.
  • Montana HB 712 prohibits noncitizens from voting.
  • Montana HB 754 allows certain personally identifiable information to be disclosed to county election officials for the purposes of verifying voter registration information. 
  • Montana HB 892 outlaws double voting within the state or in two different states. It prohibits being registered to vote in more than one location at a time and requires registrants to provide information about their previous voter registration if they have one. 
  • New Mexico HB 4 restores voting rights to citizens on parole, updates automatic voter registration provisions to include all state agencies, and creates guidelines for polling places on Tribal lands.
  • New Mexico SB 180 allows public officials’ home addresses to be confidential, requires the secretary of state to maintain an elections security program, updates clerk guidelines for accepting voter registration, and allows for electronic nominating petition signatures.
  • New York SB 1327 requires that voter changes of address must be received 15 days prior to Election Day, applications must be received 10 days or be postmarked 15 days prior to Election Day, and voters must be enrolled in a party no later than 10 days before a primary to vote in that party's primary.
  • New York SB 5984 permits individuals to register to vote and cast a provisional ballot at an early voting polling location. The ballot will be counted if the voter satisfies all requisite qualifications and the registration application was received by the 10th day prior to the election. 
  • New York AB 4009 requires correctional facilities to distribute voting rights information and a registration form to individuals over the age of 18 when they are released from custody. Corrections officials must keep a list of anyone who declines the registration form. 
  • New York SB 1733 requires private and charter schools to comply with student voter and pre-registration requirements. It requires such programs to include voter registration application assistance and education about registration requirements. 
  • North Carolina SB 747 prohibits private funding of elections. It also requires ballot applications be retained for 22 months. It lists activities poll watchers are permitted to undertake in the polling place. It updates same-day registration procedures. It prohibits voters for whom a notice has been returned as undeliverable from voting absentee in the next election. It updates timelines for filing challenges to voters and allows challenges during early voting. It guarantees that unaffiliated voters can vote in a primary of their choice. It requires any person entering the polling place other than a voter or a voter’s minor child to record their name, address and signature on a log. It requires county boards of elections to make a publicly available list of what voting method and type of ID a voter used and requires the State Board of Elections to keep a publicly available list indicating each early voter’s name, ballot number, precinct, date of voting, party affiliation and other information. It updates precinct official and election judge selection process. It clarifies when counting begins for different types of ballots. It requires the State Board of Elections to submit an annual report to the legislature indicating any changes made to voter history records other than routine updates. It also brings the state into compliance with the Electoral Count Reform Act’s requirement that the certificate of ascertainment of electors contain a security feature. It requires absentee ballot witnesses to print their names on the witness certification and updates other absentee ballot instructions. It requires online publication of absentee ballot request instructions and implements ballot curing procedures for some types of ballot defects. It allows voters to provide their phone number and email address on absentee ballot applications. It also updates various ballot return procedures. It requires county boards to submit publicly available daily reports to the State Board of Elections of numbers of returned, outstanding and provisional ballots during early voting. It makes it a misdemeanor to impersonate an election official and for anyone other than the state or county board to affix any identifier to an absentee ballot request form for tracking purposes. It adds a "knowing" standard to the provision that makes it a felony to vote without having one's right to vote properly restored after completion of their sentence. It requires election law violations and fraud to be reported to the State Bureau of Investigations instead of the Attorney General or district attorney and requires state and county boards of elections to cooperate with the SBI when requested. It updates list maintenance procedures, including by requiring various weekly maintenance and the use of jury excusal lists. The bill stipulates that voters will be removed from the rolls if they fail to respond to a confirmation mailing and do not vote in the next two even-number year elections. 
  • Oklahoma SB 377 requires voter identification cards to be mailed to voters and allows voters who cancel their registration to reapply in 60 days. The bill also cancels the registration of individuals who have been dismissed from jury duty for not being a U.S. citizen and requires county clerks to send a list of these individuals to the state board of elections each month.
  • Oklahoma SB 1040 requires that all eligible individuals be asked if they would like to register to vote when getting or renewing a driver’s license. These services may not be provided to those who cannot provide documentation that they are a U.S. citizen.
  • Oklahoma HB 1950 requires the Secretary of the State Election Board to compare the state voter registration database against Social Security Administration death records from other states and removed deceased individuals from the voter rolls.
  • Oklahoma SB 2052 allows the Secretary of the State Board of Elections to join a multistate voter list maintenance organization. It stipulates that the organization must meet before the state may join.
  • Oregon HB 2107 requires the Oregon Health Authority to submit information on eligible users to automatically register them to vote. County clerks shall use this information to contact voters to decline or declare party affiliation.
  • South Dakota SB 139 updates residence rules and requires voters to sign a voter eligibility certificate when registering to vote.
  • South Dakota SB 140 requires the secretary of state to submit annual list maintenance reports to the State Board of Elections and to publish numbers of registered voters every month. It also establishes that voters may request to be removed from the rolls. It requires clerks of court to submit lists of individuals who were excused from jury duty for reasons that also disqualify them from voting to the county for the county to conduct list maintenance accordingly. It revises various other voter registration and list maintenance procedures.
  • South Dakota SB 161 appropriates funds for list maintenance, ballot machines, and election security.
  • Tennessee HB 1039 requires the state coordinator of elections to submit a list of registered voters to the comptroller of the treasury after each decennial redistricting. The comptroller must compare the list of voters and their precincts to GIS data and provide county administrators with a report that includes information about any voters who were assigned to the wrong precinct according to the GIS data.
  • Tennessee SB 346 requires high schools to provide voter registration information to students who turn 18. 
  • Texas SB 1070 authorizes the secretary of state to work with private sector data system providers to conduct cross-state voter list maintenance. It requires the secretary of state to submit a report about the private sector data system to the legislature every quarter.
  • Texas SB 545 requires that the Department of State Health Services share death information with the secretary of state for list maintenance purposes. 
  • Utah SB 17 updates criteria and procedures for determining and challenging a voter's residency. It allows voters experiencing homelessness to use a nontraditional location for the purposes of voting residency. It stipulates that voters whose principal residence is outside the U.S. can only vote in federal elections and clarifies what congressional districts overseas voters vote in. It also allows overseas voters to register and vote at the same time if their ballot and registration declaration are received by the day before the election. 
  • Utah HB 69 updates procedures for notifying candidates and voters when a candidate is disqualified for failing to file campaign finance reports. It allows municipal clerks and the lieutenant governor to receive voter registration applications, in addition to county clerks. It stipulates that for a voter who changes party affiliation between April 1 and the date of a primary election, the new party affiliation will take effect the day after the primary canvass is complete. It requires election officials to post notice of early voting times and places and ballot box locations 28 days before the election instead of 19 days. It requires election officials to publish notice of tabulation machine tests 10 days before the test instead of 48 hours before. It updates various other notice and ballot preparation deadlines. It requires ballot initiative summaries to appear online and on the ballot or the ballot proposition information sheet. It makes minor updates to candidate filing periods. It creates notice and filing requirements for election officials to fulfill when a candidate withdraws from a race. 
  • Utah HB 365 sets the deadline to change party affiliation as the day after the declaration of candidacy deadline in a presidential election year and as April 1 in other years. If a voter files a change of affiliation between that deadline and the date of a primary election, the bill stipulates that the change of affiliation takes effect after the primary canvass is complete. It also explicitly prohibits voting in more than one party's presidential primary. 
  • Utah HB 448 requires election returns to include records of when voters were contacted to cure a ballot. It establishes the lieutenant governor as the state’s chief election officer. It lays out the lieutenant governor's rights and responsibilities and details the relationship between local election officials and the lieutenant governor, including the lieutenant governor’s responsibility to oversee local election officials. It requires the lieutenant governor to develop training for election administrators and workers. It prohibits an individual who worked on an election from auditing their own work and instructs the lieutenant governor to study different audit methods. It also updates voter registration list maintenance procedures, including those related to a voter's change of address. It requires election officials to provide accessible voting methods to voters with disabilities who cannot vote by mail. It requires a voter's signature on their return envelope to be "reasonably consistent" with the signature on file. It allows voters with disabilities preventing them from providing a consistent signature to check an alternate box and lays out criteria to verify those ballots. It updates notice requirements for notice and cure procedures. It also implements ballot chain of custody procedures. It requires election officers to conduct signature verification audits and ballot reconciliation. It requires results reports to include reconciliation and provisional ballot numbers. It stipulates that only certain government and law enforcement officials may view drop box surveillance footage. 
  • Virginia HB 1683 makes minor updates to requirements for posting notice of voter registration times and locations. 
  • Virginia HB 1948 requires each registered Virginia voter to have a unique identifying number in the state registration system. It also updates the information UOCAVA voters must submit on a federal write-in ballot. It removes the witness signature requirement for voter assistance forms and mail-in ballots.
  • Washington SB 5112 establishes automatic voter registration for individuals applying for certain government services. It also expands the required information on voter registration applications and the types of information the department of licensing must provide to the secretary of state. It updates voter acknowledgment notice mailer requirements. It also updates the state’s automatic voter registration system by requiring the department of licensing to transmit certain voter registration information to the secretary of state for any citizen aged 16 or older. It also creates penalties for any state employee who intentionally registers ineligible individuals. It requires the department of licensing to submit changed license and voter registration information to the secretary of state on a daily basis. It also allows a voter whose registration has been cancelled for certain reasons to re-register and vote a regular ballot, instead of a provisional ballot as required under current law. It makes minor list maintenance procedure changes. It also updates procedures for challenging a voter.
  • Washington SB 5153 prohibits voter registration information that is normally disclosed from being disclosed for 16- and 17-year-olds who are pre-registered to vote until they turn 18 or become eligible to vote in an election.
  • Washington SB 5208 adds forms of IDs voters can use to register online and allows registrants to submit a signature in the online registration platform.
  • Washington SB 5459 requires records requests for records and reports from the state voter registration database to be submitted to and fulfilled by the secretary of state's office. It also updates what elections-related information is exempt from disclosure.
  • West Virginia SB 631 extends the State Election Fund and provides no-interest loans to jurisdictions to assist with purchasing HAVA-required electronic voting equipment. It makes some updates to voter registration and related recordkeeping procedures. 
  • Wyoming HB 5 requires the voter registry to include each voter's registration date and unique voter identifying number.

Miscellaneous
  • Alabama HB 339 schedules the second runoff or primary election of 2024 for the third Tuesday in April.
  • Arkansas SB 447 requires that uncontested races appear on the ballot and that votes in those races be tabulated the same way as in contested races. 
  • Arkansas HB 1510 amends the months in which special elections on ballot measures can be held. It also defines “emergency” for the purposes of when emergency special elections can be held.
  • Arkansas SB 285 requires students be granted an excused absence if they are accompanying their parent while the parent is voting. 
  • California SB 386 requires cities to publish special election information before candidate nomination filing deadlines. It removes the requirement that presidential election ballots include certain voter instructions. It also extends the time period elections officials have to review initiative petition signatures. 
  • Delaware HB 82 requires the Department of Elections to mail voters a notice informing them of their polling place, election dates and available voting methods no later than 30 days before the state primary election in general election years. 
  • Florida SB 7050 updates procedures related to third party voter registration organizations and voter information card rules. It also updates voter list maintenance procedures. It directs election supervisors to submit voter history and ballot reconciliation reports to the department of elections, who must then submit reports to the legislature. It also updates election result reporting requirements, candidate oath procedures, candidate and initiative petition signature procedures, and election notice requirements. It requires supervisors of elections to maintain GIS maps of precincts and amends precinct-drawing rules. It amends absentee ballot request procedures and deadlines, including by allowing voters or their immediate family or legal guardian to submit an absentee ballot request. The bill updates canvassing procedures. It amends deadlines for submitting county returns and requires the department of elections to submit its analysis of county election reports to the legislature. The bill specifies that presidential electors will be dismissed if they do not vote for their party's candidates. The bill defines the crime of voting more than one ballot in an election. The bill establishes rules for distributing voter guide materials.
  • Georgia SB 129 requires employees to be provided time off to vote. It also makes updates to local election official performance reviews, absentee ballot application forms, and risk-limiting audit procedures.
  • Hawaii SB 179 renames the Voters with Special Needs Advisory Committee to the Elections Accessibility Advisory Committee.
  • Hawaii SB 1076 requires the Office of Elections to create a digital voter information guide and lays out procedures related to dissemination of information about the guide.
  • Idaho HB 221 prohibits electioneering and the inclusion of elected officials' names on correspondence from tax authorities.
  • Indiana HB 1335 adds procedures for alternate presidential electors and sets timelines for future elections. It also removes outdated provisions pertaining to term lengths of members of the elections division and revises per diem allowances for election officials who attend elections division meetings.
  • Louisiana HB 449 establishes an Americans with Disabilities Act compliance officer within the Secretary of State's office and a Voting Accessibility Advisory Group.
  • Louisiana HB 496 puts the Department of State in charge of mailing registration notices to voters, instead of registrars. It also makes some changes to the process of requesting copies of registrars' records and prohibits them from furnishing copies of registration applications from 16- and 17-year-olds. It also updates the dates for some municipal and special elections. It also creates new procedures for filling vacancies in political party committees, sets an opening date for the presidential primary filing period on the third Wednesday in December, and updates the form of provisional and absentee ballot envelope certificates. It also makes minor updates to absentee ballot voting and tabulation procedures to conform with a new certificate form.
  • Minnesota HB 1830 requires colleges to provide county auditors with lists of students living on campus for voter registration purposes. It also requires them to provide students with voter registration forms more frequently and to maintain webpages with voting information. It updates the process and requirements to qualify as a major political party. It clarifies that individuals on certain types of release including work release are not considered incarcerated for purposes of voting eligibility. It requires the state voter registration system to be capable of producing certain reports related to early voting. It allows for some assistance to voters with disabilities in accessing the online voter registration application. It revises the definition of "residential facility" for the purposes of Election Day registration. It allows student IDs to be used to prove residence for voting purposes if the information on the ID also appears on a university residential housing list. It allows individuals convicted of a felony to register to vote upon release from incarceration and updates list maintenance procedures related to such individuals. It prohibits challenging more than one registered voter at a time, lists new grounds for challenge and updates challenge procedures. It makes it a misdemeanor to be paid by the number of voter registration applications solicited or collected. It updates ballot and signature envelope design and requirements. It extends the deadline for in-person return of a mail ballot from 3 p.m. on Election Day to 8 p.m. It establishes early voting during the 18 days leading up to an election and updates early voting procedures. It allows election officials to run additional voting places before Election Day, and requires polling places be established on Indian reservations when a tribe requests one. It requires polling places be designated 14 weeks before the election and requires counties to provide a minimum amount of voting equipment to each polling place. It adds veterans’ homes to the list of places election officials may deliver absentee ballots. It requires absentee ballots to be delivered starting 35 days before the election instead of 25 days. It requires recordkeeping of methods of absentee ballot returns. It allows preprocessing of absentee ballots to begin 19 days before an election instead of seven days. It allows electronic transmission of ballots to voters in emergencies or to certain voters with disabilities. Such ballots must be physically printed and returned to the county auditor. It makes some updates to candidate filing requirements. It prohibits petitions from being rejected for being printed on the wrong size of paper. It makes minor updates to trainee election judge qualifications. It authorizes county auditors and clerks to remove precinct election officers for failure to properly execute their duties. It gives voters the option to vote a paper ballot or on a machine at some polling places and updates various polling place procedures. It guarantees time off from work to vote early. It removes the prohibition on a candidate assisting a voter and removes the limit of assisting only three voters per election. It adds required information to precinct election summaries and canvass reports. It makes various ballot design updates. It requires publishing information on what will be on the ballot and where voters can find more information to be published 10-20 days before an election. It updates electronic voting system requirements. It prohibits disclosure of the image of any component of a voting system. It specifies what data from voting systems will and will not be made public after tabulation. It adds Minnesota to the National Popular Vote Compact. It makes it unlawful to intimidate, dox, or harass an election official or to tamper with election equipment. It updates polling place electioneering prohibitions. It requires campaign canvassers be allowed to knock on individual apartment doors within buildings. It instructs the secretary of state to conduct a study of voter engagement and behavior, including ranked choice voting. 
  • Nevada AB 286 requires jail administrators to establish a system for eligible individuals to vote in jail.
  • New Jersey AB 5175 makes the secretary of state responsible for post-election audits instead of the attorney general. It also requires candidates to file paperwork 75 days before municipal elections. The bill also prohibits school and fire district elections from taking place in the 45 days before a primary or general election.
  • New York SB 350 requires that lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of the state's election law be brought in specified counties in the first, second, third, or fourth judicial departments of the state.
  • New York SB 7050 prohibits municipal officers and employees from displaying political ads on public property. 
  • Oregon SB 166 establishes a right to vote in state law. It also guarantees the right to a secret ballot and prohibits election officials from disclosing how anyone voted. It requires county election clerks to establish cybersecurity plans. It clarifies that voter information protected by the Address Confidentiality Program will not be subject to public inspection. It makes petition signatures subject to public inspection pursuant to the state's public records laws. It makes largely technical updates to the state's prohibitions on fraudulent activity in the petition circulation process. It makes minor updates to election law violation complaint filing procedures. It makes various updates to candidate filing timelines and petition signature requirements. It requires clerks to file amended abstracts of vote totals 30 days after the election for ballot measures instead of 37 days. It allows absentee voters to pick up their ballot from the county clerk's office starting 43 days before the date of the election and requires that ballots be mailed out by that same deadline. 
  • Pennsylvania HR 47 directs the Joint State Government Commission to conduct a study on voter education and behavior among formerly incarcerated individuals. 
  • South Carolina SB 92 clarifies that if an election protest filing deadline falls on a legal holiday, the deadline shall be moved to the next business day.
  • Texas HB 357 sets rules for when runoff elections may occur. It also makes minor updates to Texas's online system for tracking absentee ballot applications.
  • Texas SB 1933 authorizes the secretary of state to investigate and order administrative oversight of elections in a county with a population of over 4 million under certain circumstances. It also updates procedures for secretary of state audits of counties.
  • Utah HB 303 allows certain non-identifying information from a withheld voter registration record to be provided to political parties and candidates for certain uses. It requires the lieutenant governor to notify affected voters. It also updates procedures and deadlines related to disclosing information about voters whose ballots have been rejected but not yet cured. 
  • Washington SB 5459 requires records requests for records and reports from the state voter registration database to be submitted to and fulfilled by the secretary of state's office. It also updates what elections-related information is exempt from disclosure.
  • Washington HB 1048 updates the state voting rights act. It updates definitions related to, and the analysis process for, redistricting lawsuits brought under the act’s analog to the federal VRA’s Section 2. It explicitly allows for crossover districts and protects coalition districts. It also creates new remedies for a court to choose from upon finding a districting plan violates the act. It makes some updates to lawsuit filing procedures and notification and implementation of court orders. 
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