Report on 2015 State Immigration Laws

2/16/2016

State lawmakers continued tackling immigration issues in a range of policy areas in 2015. Enacted legislation dealing with immigration increased by 26 percent in 2015, with 216 laws enacted compared to 171 laws in 2014. The number of resolutions rebounded to 274 in 2015 after last year’s plunge in activity to 117 resolutions.

Trends/Highlights

  • Education. Seven states—Arizona, Idaho, Louisiana, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee and Utah—added portions of the federal naturalization exam to high school civics curricula and testing requirements. Georgia allowed local boards of education to require instruction on America’s founding philosophy and principles, including the founding documents, federalism, and transformational movements such as civil rights and the contribution of immigrants to American society. Oregon allowed students exempt from nonresident tuition to access state financial aid. Nevada established a State Seal of Biliteracy program.
  • Identification documents. North Carolina ended the use of consulate or embassy documents, other than a valid passport, to determine a person’s identification or residence for government or law enforcement purposes. The law also prohibits identity documents created by individuals, organizations or localities unless expressly permitted by the General Assembly.
  • Licensing. Illinois allowed the Illinois Supreme Court to grant licenses to practice law for individuals who have received Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) and have work authorization. Wyoming repealed a provision requiring bar applicants to be U.S. citizens. Nebraska allowed driver’s licenses for DACA recipients. Utah amended existing driving privilege cards to require applicants to submit fingerprints, photograph and a waiver to participate in certain criminal records databases.
  • Health. California allowed health care for all children regardless of immigration status.
  • Human Trafficking. Tennessee provided for training of law enforcement officers directly involved with human trafficking on civil and immigration remedies and community resources. Texas extended the Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force.
  • Law Enforcement. Illinois required foreign nationals who are arrested or detained to be informed of their right to have their consular officials notified. Tennessee allows permanent legal residents who are honorably discharged veterans to be employed as a police officer. North Carolina prohibited cities and counties from adopting sanctuary ordinances that would limit enforcement of federal immigration laws.
  • Task Forces. Louisiana created a task force to study the impact of illegal immigration on Louisiana taxpayers. Oregon established a task force to investigate immigration consultant fraud. Texas created an advisory committee to examine and recommend revisions to any state laws pertaining to juvenile records. Texas also established an Advisory Council on Cultural Affairs in the Office of the Governor.
  • Resolutions. Seven states adopted 13 resolutions seeking action from Congress or the Administration. These include requesting support for immigration reform (California, Nevada); reimbursement for state costs of securing the border with Mexico (Texas); alternatives to detainment of immigrant families seeking asylum (New Mexico); expedited family reunification for Filipino veterans of World War II (Hawaii) and entry for disabled veterans of the South Vietnamese Army (California). Four states—California, Delaware, Illinois and New Jersey—passed resolutions proclaiming June as Immigrant Heritage Month.
  • Refugees. South Carolina required the Department of Social Services to provide information regarding the resettlement of refugees in Spartanburg, S.C. to ensure accountability and transparency of the expenditure of public funds. Texas required meetings to be held in the communities proposed for refugee placement with representatives, local governmental entities and officials, and other stakeholders. The California Senate urged the president to dramatically increase the number of Syrian refugees allowed into the United States of America. Michigan urged the president of the United States to allow an additional 25,000 refugee visas for displaced Iraqis, with preference for placement in state. New Hampshire recognized the contribution of Bhutanese refugees to New Hampshire, and requested the U.S. government to work diligently on resolving the Bhutanese refugee crisis.
  • Texas was the most active state in 2015 with 84 resolutions and 15 laws followed by California with 66 laws and 2 resolutions.

 

Immigration Map

*This map reflects immigration legislation that was enacted between January and December 2015, including resolutions that were adopted.

What Are the Numbers?

At the end of 2015, lawmakers in 49 states and Puerto Rico enacted 216 laws and 274 resolutions related to immigration, for a total of 490. An additional 24 bills were vetoed by governors. Looking only at laws and not resolutions, enacted legislation increased 26 percent in 2015 compared to the same timeframe in 2014, with 216 laws compared to 171.

The total of 490 laws and resolutions is a 70 percent increase from the total of 288 enacted in 2014, and a 10 percent increase from the 438 enacted in 2013. Alaska did not enact immigration-related legislation in 2015.



Immigration Pie Chart

  • The largest category, resolutions, accounted for 41 percent of all adopted measures related to immigration.
  • Thirteen percent of all laws are budget and appropriations laws, authorizing funds for such purposes as providing for immigration enforcement, English language and citizenship classes, and migrant and refugee programs.
  • Legislation related to law enforcement accounted for 9 percent.
  • Legislation related to driver’s licenses and IDs comprised 9 percent of all enacted laws on immigration.
  • Eight percent of laws were focused on employment, limiting workers’ compensation or unemployment insurance, limiting certain jobs to US citizens or legal immigrants, or defining employment to exclude agricultural labor. One law related to E-Verify was enacted in 2015.
  • Five percent of laws related to health such as health equity, mental health, eligibility criteria for Medicaid or licensing relating to health professionals.
  • Five percent of laws dealt with education, addressing immigration and residency requirements for higher education.
  • Four percent of laws addressed public benefits such as case management, child welfare and adoption.
  • Four percent of laws addressed human trafficking, including penalties for withholding or destroying immigration documents, or to work with federal offices on special immigrant visas for victims.

Methodology: This report summarizes laws and resolutions enacted between January and December, 2015. Laws included in this overview address legal immigrants, migrant and seasonal workers, refugees or unauthorized immigrants. Terms used in this report by and large reflect those used in the state legislation. In some state legislative language, unauthorized immigrants are also described as “illegal immigrants,” “undocumented immigrants” or “aliens.”

 

Subjects of Immigration-Related Laws Enacted by Year | January-December
 

Subject

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Budgets

49

19

38

25

37

50

Education

17

20

13

21

15

31

Employment

27

27

14

21

22

20

Health

17

23

12

15

14

26

Human Trafficking

8

5

9

12

11

7

ID/Drivers Licensing

26

27

14

36

26

22

Law Enforcement

37

39

26

25

27

24

Miscellaneous

20

12

10

14

3

17

Omnibus

2

6

1

1

0

0

Public Benefits

9

15

16

12

13

13

Voting

6

4

3

3

3

6

Resolutions

138

109

111

253

117

274

Total (Excluding Resolutions)

218

197

156

185

171

216

Total (Including Resolutions)

356

306

267

438

288

490

Immigration chart

Budget

Lawmakers in 31 states enacted 50 laws: Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. Nine additional bills were vetoed.

These laws typically appropriate funds for refugee services, migrant health, naturalization services, education and English as a Second Language programs, or law enforcement.

  • Example: AZ S 1469. This appropriates funds for gang and immigration intelligence team enforcement, mission border security and law enforcement.
  • Example: CA H 93. This appropriation includes funds for a feasibility study for medical assistance to immigrants without satisfactory immigration status 19 years of age or older. It also includes funds for legal assistance for those eligible for deferred action under the President’s 2014 Executive Order and for naturalization services.
  • Example: IA H 658. This law allocates funds for community college adult education and literacy programs to provide Iowans with international resources and new Iowans access to economic and leadership development, making Iowa a more inclusive and welcoming place to live, work, and raise a family. The pilot project shall provide supplemental support services for international refugees to improve learning, English literacy, life skills, cultural competencies, and integration into their communities.
  • Example: MS S 2855. This budget legislation for the Department of Corrections limits certain funds from being spent until the department submits an application to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to participate in the Criminal Alien Program.
  • Example: WA S 5988. The Department of Transportation must evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the federal EB-5 immigrant investor program for financing the construction of a safety of life at sea vessel for the Anacortes-Sidney ferry route and deliver the evaluation to the transportation committees of the legislature and the office of financial management by Dec. 1, 2015.

Education

Lawmakers in 16 states and Puerto Rico enacted 31 laws: Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and Puerto Rico. Two additional bills were vetoed.

These laws usually pertain to immigration and residency requirements for access to higher education, in-state tuition or financial assistance at educational institutions. Some laws address licensing for teachers, classes for refugees or English learners, or classes on immigration. In 2015, seven states added civic education requirements using portions of the federal naturalization exam (see the 2015 mid-year report).

  • Example: CA A 146. This law required the State Board of Education to find ways to incorporate the history of Mexican-American repatriation during the 1930's and 40's into the human rights social studies curriculum.
  • Example: GA H 502. This law adds a new section that each local board of education may require high school students to pass a course on America’s founding philosophy and principles. Among the two dozen identified areas of instruction are: the founding documents, the purpose of limited government, the structure of government, separation of powers and checks and balances, federalism, freedoms guaranteed by the Bill of Rights, equality before the law and due process, and transformational movements in American history, including civil rights and the contributions of immigrants to American society.
  • Example: LA H 181. This law provides an exception to citizenship requirements of the Taylor Opportunity Program for Students recipients, allowing a non-citizen student to receive an award if the parent is a non-citizen who is serving in or was honorably discharged from the U.S. Armed Forces.
  • Example: NV A 166. This law establishes a State Seal of Biliteracy program to recognize students who graduate from a public high school who have attained a high level of proficiency in one or more languages in addition to English.
  • Example: OR S 932. This law allows students who are exempt from paying nonresident tuition to access state financial aid scholarships and grants.
  • Example: WV H 2005. This law establishes that a certificate to teach may be granted only to a person who is a U.S. citizen and meets other qualifications. However, a permit to teach in the public schools of this state may be granted to a person who is an exchange teacher from a foreign country or an alien person who meets the requirements to teach.

Twenty states currently have statutes that condition eligibility for in-state tuition on attendance and graduation from a state high school and acceptable college admission applications. For more information, please see NCSL’s publication on in-state tuition and unauthorized immigrant students.

Employment

Eleven states enacted 20 laws: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Texas and Washington. Two additional bills were vetoed.

These laws address eligibility for unemployment insurance, workers compensation, work authorization and E-Verify, workforce investment activities, and employer retaliation.

  • Example: CA A 1270. This law amends the California’s Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to conform with the 2014 federal law, which expands the definition of an "individual with employment barriers" to include those who are English language learners, have low levels of literacy, or are facing substantial cultural barriers, eligible migrant and seasonal farmworkers, and other specified populations.
  • Example: CA S 623. This law ensures that a person, regardless of citizenship or immigration status, shall not be excluded from receiving benefits under the Uninsured Employers Fund or Subsequent Injuries Benefits Trust Fund.
  • Example: MD S 829. This law exempts persons licensed to practice audiology or speech-language pathology in another state or a foreign country from a licensure requirement while the individuals are providing a clinical demonstration or receiving clinical training at a training or an educational event in the state.
  • Example: NC S 513. The law amending the Farm Act includes a provision that conforms compensation paid to an H-2A agricultural worker to federal wage withholding standards.
  • Example: NC H 318. This law amends the state’s E-Verify requirement for governmental contractors and subcontractors to use E-Verify to show compliance by including an E-Verify provision in the contract. It prohibits the use of consulate or embassy documents, other than a valid passport, to determine a person's identification or residence for governmental and law enforcement purposes and prohibits identity documents created by individuals, organizations or localities unless expressly permitted by the General Assembly. It also prohibited cities and counties from adopting sanctuary ordinances that would limit enforcement of federal immigration laws.

For additional information on E-Verify legislation, please see NCSL’s publication.

Health

Sixteen states enacted 26 laws: Arkansas, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Washington. Three additional bills were vetoed.

These laws typically pertain to eligibility requirements for Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program, language access, and eligibility criteria for licenses within the health profession.

  • Example: CA S 4. This law required individuals under 19 years of age enrolled in restricted-scope Medi-Cal to be enrolled in the full scope of Medi-Cal benefits, if otherwise eligible.
  • Example: IL H 2731. This law required monthly reports on enrollment in medical assistance programs, including demographic and language preference data.
  • Example: NV A 39. This law increases the cap on the application fee for J-1 visa physicians from $500 to $2000.
  • Example: OK S 434. This law allows chiropractic licenses for applicants who graduated from board-approved and accredited chiropractic schools, colleges or programs outside the United States. Applicants with documentation in a foreign language submitted by the Board must be accompanied by notarized English translations. International applicants shall provide satisfactory evidence of meeting the requirements for permanent residence or temporary nonimmigrant status.
  • Example: SD H 1045. Any foreign-trained or any other graduate from a dental program or dental hygiene program not accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation may apply for a license to practice as a dentist or dental hygienist. The board, by rule promulgated pursuant to chapter 1-26, shall establish requirements to reasonably ensure that an applicant's training and education are sufficient for licensure.
  • Example: UT H 194. This law authorizes a license as an occupational therapist to an applicant who meets the requirements, and has been licensed in a state, district, or U.S. territory, or in a foreign country, where the education, experience, or examination requirements are not substantially equal to the requirements of this state, if the applicant passes an examination.

Human Trafficking

Five states and Puerto Rico enacted seven laws: Arkansas, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Puerto Rico. One additional bill was vetoed.

These laws provide benefits and protections to victims of human trafficking and address penalties for traffickers.

  • Example TN H 275. This law provides for the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to implement a course of instruction for the training of law enforcement officers and other government officials who are directly involved with human trafficking, including information on civil and immigration remedies and community resources.
  • Example TX H 188. This law extends the Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force, which develops recommendations for addressing the demand for forced labor or services or sexual conduct involving victims of human trafficking. The task force collaborates, as needed, with special agents or customs and border protection officers and border patrol agents of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, among other agencies.

ID’s/Driver's Licenses and Other Licenses

Lawmakers in 18 states enacted 22 laws: Arkansas, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming. Three additional bills were vetoed.

In addition to providing for the eligibility of state-issued identification cards and driver’s licenses, these laws address a range of topics including firearm permits, hunting and recreational permits, and documentation requirements for driver’s license applications.

  • Example: ID S 1016. Every applicant for a class A, B or C driver's license or commercial learner's permit shall provide proof of U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent residency unless the applicant's driving record already contains such documentation. Every applicant for a nondomiciled class A, B or C driver's license or commercial learner's permit domiciled in a foreign country must provide an unexpired employment authorization document issued by the department of homeland security or an unexpired foreign passport accompanied by an approved I-94 form.
  • Example: IL S 23. This law allows the Illinois Supreme Court to grant a license to practice law to a person that has received Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and has a current and valid employment authorization document.
  • Example: IL S 1898. Beginning July 1, 2016, every identification card issued to an applicant who is not a U.S. citizen shall expire in five years or the date the applicant's authorized stay in the United States terminates, whichever is earlier.
  • Example: NE L 623. The legislature adopted the definitions of lawful status under the federal REAL ID Act of 2005 for eligibility for a federal secure motor vehicle operator’s license or state identification card and allows driver’s licenses for DACA recipients.
  • Example: UT S 184. This law amends requirements for driving privilege cards. The Bureau of Criminal Identification shall send fingerprints of applicants to national criminal records databases and request they be retained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Next Generation Identification system's Rap Back Service for search by future submissions. Notification of any criminal history record entered in local, state, or federal databases shall be made to the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
  • Example: WY H 214. This law modifies licensure of attorneys, including the repeal of a provision requiring bar applicants to be citizens of the United States, codifying the holding of State ex rel. Mansfield v. State Bd. of Law Examiners, which found the requirement to be an unconstitutional violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

For additional information on driver's license legislation, please see NCSL’s publication.

Law Enforcement

Lawmakers in 12 states enacted 24 laws: Arizona, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Washington.

These laws typically pertain to the enforcement of immigration laws, but also include regulations pertaining to those working as notary publics and immigration consultants.

  • Example: CA A 365. This law required the court to allow a party whose deportation or detention by the federal Department of Homeland Security materially affects his or her ability to appear in person at a child custody proceeding to present testimony and evidence and participate in mandatory child custody mediation by electronic means, including telephone, video teleconferencing or other means, to the extent that this technology is reasonably available to the court and protects the due process rights of all parties.
  • Example: CA S 674. This law required that law enforcement or child protective services certify "victim helpfulness" on a Petition for U Nonimmigrant Status for a noncitizen victim of a qualifying criminal activity who is being helpful to the detection, investigation, or prosecution of qualifying criminal activity. The law required an annual report to the legislature.
  • Example: IL H 1337. This law required that when foreign nationals are arrested or detained, they must be advised of their right to have their consular officials notified, and if an individual chooses to exercise that right, a law enforcement official is required to notify the consulate.
  • Example: RI H 5819. This law addresses racial disparities in traffic stops. It includes a provision requiring state police and all municipal law enforcement agencies to make available as public record any law enforcement exemptions, including copies of any formal or informal arrangement between the state police, a municipal law enforcement agency, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement/Homeland Security investigations; and any policies or procedures governing the circumstances under which an inquiry to federal authorities is made to determine a person's immigration status. This law is the companion to RI S 669.
  • Example: TN S 1012. This law permits any permanent legal resident of the United States who is an honorably discharged veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces to be employed as a police officer, provided that the officer applies for or obtains U.S. citizenship within six years of the employment start date.
  • Example: TX H 11. This law requires the attorney general to establish a transnational and organized crime division to address border security and organized crime, including prosecuting trafficking in persons and assisting victims of trafficking. It provides for department assistance at international border checkpoints, and makes it an offense to encourage an individual to enter or remain in the United States in violation of federal law by concealing, harboring or shielding that person from detection. The law requires the lieutenant governor and the speaker of the House of Representatives to create a joint interim committee to study border security, which is required to submit a report to the 85th Legislature.
  • Example: TX H 12. This law required the governor to establish a border prosecution unit within the criminal justice division to prosecute border crime.

Miscellaneous

Nine states and Puerto Rico enacted 17 laws: Alabama, California, Louisiana, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas and Puerto Rico. Two additional bills were vetoed.

This category includes immigration-related issues that do not fit in other categories and are addressed infrequently, memberships on task forces and commissions, abandoned property and studies.

  • Example: LA H 242. In parishes that send out jury duty notices or questionnaires, the clerk of court must notify the Department of State of any returned jury duty notice or questionnaire indicating the person is unable to serve because he is not a U.S. citizen. Upon the expiration of each jury selection panel, each federal district court in the state shall notify the Department of State of any person identified as not being a U.S. citizen.
  • Example: OR H 3525. This law establishes the Task Force on Immigration Consultant Fraud and required a report by September 15, 2015.
  • Example: TX H 431. This law creates an advisory committee to examine and recommend revisions to any state laws pertaining to juvenile records. The committee will include 12 individuals with expertise in federal records and federal immigration policy.
  • Example: TX S 459. This law establishes the Advisory Council on Cultural Affairs in the Office of the Governor to advise the office on setting policy priorities addressing and raising public awareness of major issues affecting this state due to the rapid growth of the state's Hispanic population, and other issues resulting from changes in demographics in the state.

Public Benefits

Ten states and Puerto Rico enacted 13 laws: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Utah and Puerto Rico.

These laws address social service programs that affect all people covered by the programs—immigrants and non-immigrants alike—and laws that ensure benefits are granted only to eligible immigrants.

  • Example: CA S 708. This law on pupil nutrition allows school governing bodies to make applications for free or reduced-price meals electronically available online and required that applications have clear instructions for families that are homeless or migrants.
  • Example: KS H 2258. This law states that adults applying for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) are required to complete a work program assessment. Adults who are not otherwise eligible for TANF, such as ineligible aliens, are not required to complete a work program assessment process. If an applicant is working with a refugee social services agency, they are also exempt from the work program assessment. This law limits eligibility for the food assistance program to those individuals who are citizens or who meet qualified non-citizen status as determined by U.S. Department of Agriculture. Non-citizen individuals who are unable or unwilling to provide qualifying immigrant documentation residing within a household shall not be included when determining the household's size for the purposes of assigning a benefit level to the household for food assistance or comparing the household's monthly income with the income eligibility standards. The gross non-exempt earned and unearned income and resources of disqualified individuals shall be counted in its entirety as available to the remaining household members

Voting

Five states enacted six laws: California, Connecticut, Kansas, North Dakota and Oregon. Two additional bills were vetoed.

These laws clarify voter registration requirements and valid documents to prove U.S. citizenship.

  • Example: CA A554. This law authorizes an elections official to appoint a pupil who is lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States to serve as a precinct board member.

Resolutions

Twenty nine states and Puerto Rico adopted 274 resolutions: Alabama, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, West Virginia and Puerto Rico.

Resolutions typically commend citizens, immigrants, and immigrant-serving organizations for their contributions, recognize the cultural heritage of immigrants in a state, and urge Congress or the President of the United States to take certain actions.

  • Example: CA AJR 19. This resolution urges the Congress of the United States to enact legislation allowing immigrants to serve in the military if they are eligible under the President's Executive Order for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or Executive Order for Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents.
  • Example: CA SJR 5. This resolution urges Congress and the president to expand the Humanitarian Resettlement Program to allow disabled veteran officers of the South Vietnamese Army currently living in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to enter the United States.
  • Example: CA SJR 13. This resolution urges the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold the federal constitutional principle of one person, one vote and not deny the state's children and immigrants equal protection under the law.
  • Example: CA SR 52. This resolution urges the president to dramatically increase the number of Syrian refugees allowed into the United States and to work with the United Nations and other countries to preserve life and dignity for Syrian refugees.
  • Example: DE HR 19. This resolution designates June 2015 as Immigrant Heritage Month in Delaware, recognizing the significant contributions immigrants have made to the state and nation.
  • Example: IN HR 35 &SCR 27. These resolutions recognize Father Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., who passed away on Feb. 26, 2015. Father Hesburgh was President of the University of Notre Dame from 1952-1987. He held a number of influential public positions dealing with civil and human rights, including immigration and refugee affairs.
  • Example: HI HR 12. This resolution requests access to justice commission to assemble various state and community entities to determine which agency or organization should administer funding for civil legal services to the low- and moderate-income. Civil legal services provides better access to the justice system to the indigent who are immigrants, homeless, at risk of homelessness, families in crisis, consumers who have been taken advantage of, and those who speak English as a second language.
  • Example: HI SR 44. This resolution urges Congress and the President to support the passage of legislation to expedite family reunification for certain Filipino Veterans of World War II.
  • Example: LA HR 175. This resolution creates a task force to study the impact of illegal immigration on Louisiana taxpayers.
  • Example: NH SCR 1. This resolution recognizes the contribution of Bhutanese refugees to New Hampshire, and requests the U.S. government to work diligently on resolving the Bhutanese refugee crisis, reaching an agreement to allow the option of repatriation, and promoting human rights and democracy in Bhutan.
  • Example: TN SJR 387. This resolution recognizes U.S. Senator Bob Corker on being named one of Time magazine's 2015 100 Most Influential People in the World. Senator Corker has lent his valuable expertise and leadership to a number of national concerns, including those of debt, financial regulation, immigration, and foreign relations and policy.
  • Example: TX HR 1918. This resolution congratulates Sarah R. Saldana on her confirmation as assistant secretary in charge of Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security.
  • Example: VA HJR 674. This resolution commemorates the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965.
  • Example: VA SJR 9. This Joint Resolution encourages public high schools to explore recruiting and enrolling international students on F-1 student visas in order to promote tuition-based income, and expose F-1 students and public school K-12 Vermont students to enriched cross-cultural learning experiences.

Additional Resources

 

Prepared by

Ann Morse, program director, Immigrant Policy Project, NCSL
Gilberto Soria Mendoza, policy specialist, Immigrant Policy Project, NCSL
Jennifer Mayorga, NCSL fall fellow, 2015

Reviewers:

Molly Ramsdell, director, Washington Office, NCSL
Neal Osten, Ddrector, Washington Office, NCSL

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, February 2016

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