2015 Immigration Report

8/3/2015

Introduction

In the first half of 2015, enacted legislation related to immigration increased by 16 percent to 153 compared with 132 laws in 2014. The number of resolutions bounced back to 238 after last year’s sharp decline to 84. Lawmakers in 46 states and Puerto Rico enacted 153 laws and 238 resolutions related to immigration, for a total of 391. An additional 10 bills were vetoed by governors and 20 are pending signatures. Four states did not enact immigration-related legislation in the first half of 2015: Alaska, Massachusetts, North Carolina and Ohio. The increase can be explained in part because every state was in regular session in 2015, unlike 2014 when five states were not in session.

Trends

  • Education. Seven states—Arizona, Idaho, Louisiana, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee and Utah—have found their own use for the federal exam for immigrants to become naturalized citizens. Portions of the test have been added to high school civics curricula and testing requirements. Connecticut reduced the requirement for an unauthorized student to attend high school from four years to two to be classified as a student eligible for in-state tuition. Utah provided an exemption to verification of lawful presence for privately funded scholarships administered by colleges or universities. Missouri barred in-state tuition and scholarship funds for students with unlawful immigration status, including students who have been granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
  • Driver’s Licenses. Delaware and Hawaii enacted legislation to give unauthorized immigrants driving privileges.
  • Health. California extended Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program, to children under 19 ineligible for Medicaid because of their immigration status. Georgia permitted licensing for foreign-trained nurses. Oregon required the use of certified or qualified health care interpreters to ensure accurate and adequate health care for those with limited English proficiency.
  • Human Trafficking. Arkansas required law enforcement agencies to adopt a policy for the completion and signing of T and U non-immigrant visa certification forms for human trafficking victims. Puerto Rico offered assistance to immigrant victims of human trafficking.
  • Law Enforcement. Arizona amended its law related to building to a border fence. California added protections for consumer fraud related to immigration services to include presidential executive actions. Nevada added penalties for employers that advertise notary public services as a “notario” unless the individual is a lawyer licensed to practice in the state.
  • Public Benefits. Rhode Island’s law states that homeless people have a right to services regardless of political or religious beliefs, immigration status, disability, gender, etc., and created a committee to regulate shelter services. Maine and Utah clarified eligibility for general assistance of certain noncitizens.
  • Task forces/offices. California established a statewide director of immigrant integration. Minnesota created three ethnic councils: the Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs; Council for Minnesotans of African Heritage; and the Council on Asian-Pacific Minnesotans.
  • Seven states adopted resolutions seeking action from Congress or the administration. These include requesting support for comprehensive immigration reform (California, Nevada); action against illegal fishing (Louisiana, Texas); requesting an additional 25,000 refugee visas for displaced Iraqis (Michigan); restoration of federal health care for residents present under the compacts of free association (Hawaii); reimbursement to the state for the financial burden of securing the Mexico border (Texas); and alternatives to the detainment of immigrant families seeking asylum in this country (New Mexico). Other resolutions addressed refugee resettlement (South Carolina); genocide prevention and awareness month (Georgia); and a review of health and law enforcement policies related immigrant communities (Puerto Rico).
  • E-Verify. Indiana required contractors to submit case verification numbers before work begins on a public work project. Texas mandated E-Verify for state agencies.
  • Employment. Washington created an agricultural labor skills and safety grant program for workers in the state and allowed participation by seasonal migrant workers who intend to return to Washington for agricultural work.
  • Voting. Connecticut required “drive only” licenses to contain language on the back indicating that they cannot be used for voting. North Dakota created a legislative management study relating to verification of citizenship status for voting and for issuance of driver’s licenses to noncitizens.
  • Refugees. Texas required stakeholder meetings in communities proposed for refugee placement.

 

Immigration Laws Map Jan - June 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legislation By Category

Enacted Immigration Legislation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

  • The largest category—23 percent of all laws—are budget and appropriations laws, authorizing funds for such purposes as providing for immigration enforcement, English language and citizenship classes, and migrant and refugee programs.
  • Fifteen percent of laws dealt with education, addressing immigration and residency requirements for higher education, and this year, states included portions of the federal naturalization exam in high school civics requirements.
  • Fourteen percent of laws related to health such as health equity, interpreters, eligibility criteria for Medicaid or licensing relating to health professionals.
  • Legislation related to law enforcement, such as immigration enforcement and consumer fraud related to legal services, accounted for 10 percent.
  • Legislation related to ID’s/driver’s licenses and other licenses made up 12 percent of all enacted laws on immigration.
  • Six percent of laws were focused on employment, E-Verify, limiting workers’ compensation or unemployment insurance, or defining employment.
  • Five percent of laws addressed public benefits such as case management, child welfare and adoption.
  • Five percent of laws addressed human trafficking, such as penalties for withholding or destroying immigration documents and providing assistance to victims.
     

Methodology: This report summarizes laws and resolutions enacted between January and June 2015. Laws included in this overview address legal immigrants, migrant and seasonal workers, refugees or unauthorized immigrants. Terms used in this report by and large reflect those used in the state legislation. In some state legislative language, unauthorized immigrants are also described as “illegal immigrants,” “undocumented immigrants” or “aliens.”
 

Categories of Immigration-Related Laws Enacted January-June by Year

Category

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Budgets

41

20

29

20

33

35

Education

13

13

7

15

9

23

Employment

27

22

10

14

18

10

Health

15

18

9

14

10

22

Human Trafficking

7

4

9

10

8

7

ID/Drivers Licensing

23

23

12

34

18

19

Law Enforcement

33

42

20

16

23

15

Miscellaneous

22

11

5

11

2

10

Omnibus

2

6

1

0

0

0

Public Benefits

3

12

9

10

10

8

Voting

5

3

3

2

1

4

Resolutions

128

95

92

231

84

238

Total (Excluding Resolutions)

191

174

114

146

132

153

Total (Including Resolutions)

319

269

206

377

216

391

 


Immigration Related Legislation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budget

Lawmakers in 24 states enacted 35 laws: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Washington. Two additional bills were vetoed in two states.

These laws typically appropriate funds for refugee services; migrant health; naturalization services; education and English as a Second Language programs; or law enforcement.

  • Example: CA A 93. Of the funds appropriated for support of State Department of Health Care Services, up to $1 million shall be used for research to determine the feasibility of a capped program that would provide medical assistance to people 19 years of age or older who do not have satisfactory immigration status or are unable to establish satisfactory immigration status.
  • Example: MN S 1458. This law appropriates $500,000 in fiscal year 2016 and $500,000 in fiscal year 2017 to create the international medical graduates assistance program to address barriers to practice and facilitate pathways to assist immigrant international medical graduates to integrate into the Minnesota health care delivery system, with the goal of increasing access to primary care in rural and under-served areas of the state. The Department of Health must report recommendations to the legislature by Jan. 15, 2017.
  • Example: TX H 1. This law provides for seven universities in northern Texas to receive $150,000 each for certifying teachers in bilingual education and English as a Second Language in the 2016-17 biennium.


Education

Lawmakers in 14 states enacted 23 laws: Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia. Two additional laws were vetoed in two states.

These laws usually pertain to immigration and residency requirements for access to higher education, in-state tuition, or financial assistance at educational institutions. Some laws address enhanced learning for refugees or English learners. This year, legislation was passed to include portions of the federal naturalization exam in high school civics requirements.

  • Example: AZ H 2064. This law requires the high school graduation requirements for social studies to include passing a test identical to the civics portion of the naturalization test used by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
  • Example: CT H 6844. This law amends existing law related to requirements for residents, other than certain nonimmigrant aliens, to be classified as an in-state for tuition purposes. Students must have completed at least two years of high school in the state, rather than the previous four year requirement.
  • Example: ID S 1071. This law requires high school students to successfully complete a civics test, which includes questions used by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of U.S. history and the principles and form of U.S. government.
  • Example: LA S 283. This law adds a unit of study to the school civics curriculum that includes civics-related subject matter of which naturalized citizens are required to demonstrate a knowledge, including fundamentals of the history, principles, and form of the U.S. government.
  • Example: MO H 3. This law bars funds to institutions of higher education that offer a tuition rate less than the international rate to students with unlawful immigration status, and bars scholarship funds to students with unlawful immigration status.
  • Example: ND H 1087. This law requires high school students to pass a civics test prior to being awarded a diploma, to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of U.S. history and the principles and form of U.S. government. This test will consist of questions used in the naturalization test administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
  • Example: SC S 437. This law enacts the “James B. Edwards Civics Education Initiative” to require all students of public or charter schools or people pursuing a general educational development certificate in South Carolina to take the citizenship civics test produced by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Although students are not required to achieve a minimum score, the bill directs school districts to award a certificate of achievement to students who receive a passing grade.
  • Example: TN H 10. This law requires high school students, except those in programs where such testing has been determined inappropriate, to take a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services test.
  • Example: UT S 60. This law amends the “American Civics Education Initiative,” requiring all high school graduates to pass a civics test, to define "basic civics test" as a test that includes 50 of the 100 questions on the civics test form used by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to determine that an individual applying for U.S. citizenship meets the basic citizenship skills specified.

Twenty states currently have statutes that condition eligibility for in-state tuition on attendance and graduation from a state high school and acceptable college admission applications. For more information, please see NCSL’s publication on in-state tuition and unauthorized immigrant students.
 

Employment

Lawmakers in eight states enacted 10 laws: Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Texas and Washington. An additional two laws were vetoed.

These laws address eligibility for unemployment insurance, workers compensation, work authorization and E-Verify, and employer retaliation.

  • Example: IN H 1019. This law requires a contractor to submit, before work begins on a public work project, the E-Verify case verification number for each individual who is required to be verified. Those whose final case result is final non-confirmation may not be employed on the public works project. A public agency will report contractors who violate E-verify provisions to the appropriate agency.
  • Example: TX S 374. This law requires state agencies to register and participate in the E-verify program, to verify information of all new employees, and requires the Texas Workforce Commission to adopt and prescribe forms to implement these rules, effective September 1, 2015.
  • Example: WA H 1127. This law requires the department to create and administer the agricultural labor skills and safety grant program to provide training opportunities open to all Washington agricultural workers, including seasonal migrant workers who intend to return to Washington state to work in the state's agriculture.

For additional information on E-Verify legislation, please see NCSL’s publication.
 

Health

Lawmakers in 15 states enacted 22 laws: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Washington.

These laws typically pertain to eligibility requirements for Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program, language access, and eligibility criteria for licenses within the health profession.

  • Example: CA S 75. This law extends eligibility for full-scope Medi-Cal benefits to people under 19 years of age who do not have, or are unable to establish, satisfactory immigration status and as a result do not qualify for the federal Medicaid Program. The bill directs the State Department of Health Care Services to seek any necessary federal approvals to obtain federal financial participation for these services, and would require that these services be provided with state-only funds only if federal financial participation is not available.
  • Example: CT S 988. This law specifies that priority of the Labor Commissioner's grants-in-aid to public and nonprofit organizations would be given to organizations providing services for working age populations, including migrant and contingent workers.
  • Example: GA H 394. This law adds language to allow licensure of those who graduated from a nursing education program outside of the U.S. that is determined by the board to be equivalent to and not less stringent than an approved nursing education program.
  • Example: NY A 3007. This law requires the commissioner of Health to submit an annual report to the temporary president of the Senate and the speaker of the Assembly that includes the demographics of basic health program enrollees, including immigration status. This law also outlines the eligibility requirements for applicants and recipients who are non-citizens in a valid nonimmigrant status applying for medical assistance.
  • Example: OR H 2419. This law provides that it is the Legislative Assembly's policy to require the use of certified or qualified health care interpreters whenever possible to ensure the accurate and adequate provision of health care to people with limited English proficiency, and includes definitions for “health care interpreter” and “qualified health care interpreter.” The law also changes the Oregon Council on Health Care Interpreters in the Oregon Health Authority to consist of no more than 15 members, appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority, representing: people with expertise and experience in the administration of or policymaking for programs or services related to interpreters, employers or contractors of health care interpreters, health care interpreter training programs, language access service providers, and practicing certified and qualified health care interpreters.


Human Trafficking

Lawmakers in five states and Puerto Rico enacted seven laws: Arkansas, North Dakota, Puerto Rico, Tennessee, Texas and Utah. One additional bill was vetoed.

These laws provide benefits and protections to victims of human trafficking and address penalties for traffickers.

  • Example: AR S 1012. This law amends the definition of a child placement agency to include an entity that places, plans for the placement or assists in the placement of a child victim of human trafficking in a home or any type of shelter or facility. The law requires law enforcement agencies to adopt a policy for the completion and signing of T and U non-immigrant visa certification forms for human trafficking victims. It includes provisions for training prosecutors on the fines for the Safe Harbor Fund for Sexually Exploited Children and adds two positions on the Arkansas Child Abuse/Rape/Domestic Violence Commission for experts knowledgeable on human trafficking.
  • Example: PR H 1657. This law creates the Care Act for immigrant victims of human trafficking to help these victims regulate immigration status. It orders the Office for Assistance to Victims and Witnesses of Crime Department to coordinate the processing of referrals for victims of human trafficking and supplying information about the visa application. It orders the Puerto Rico Police to refer cases in alleged human trafficking to the Office for Assistance to Victims and Witnesses of Crime Department of Justice.
  • Example: TX S 1853. This law relates to authorizing the Department of Public Safety of the state to establish a statewide program for the prevention and detection of the unlawful possession and imminent movement or transfer between the state and an adjacent state or the United Mexican States of firearms, controlled substances, or currency, or the commission or imminent commission of the offenses of smuggling or trafficking of people. This law also provides for certain related peace officer standards.


ID’s | Driver's Licenses and Other Licenses

Lawmakers in 16 states enacted 19 laws: Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming. One additional bill was vetoed.

In addition to providing for the eligibility of state-issued identification cards and driver’s licenses, these laws address a range of topics including professional licenses, firearm permits, hunting and recreational permits, and documentation requirements for driver’s license applications.

  • Example: DE S 59. This law creates the means for an undocumented immigrant to obtain a driving privilege card in Delaware. A driving privilege card or permit applicant must provide the state with satisfactory documentary evidence and that the applicant has filed a Delaware income tax return or resided in Delaware and been claimed as a dependent by an individual who has filed a state income tax return for the previous two years. The card is not considered a valid form of identification because of the applicant's inability to prove legal presence in the U.S.
  • Example: HI H 1007. This law authorizes the issuance of driver’s licenses to residents of Hawaii who cannot provide proof of authorized presence in the U.S. Applicants must provide satisfactory proof of identity and Hawaii residency.
  • Example: LA H 836. This law lists the documents accepted to obtain a marriage license if a party does not have a U.S. Social Security number or U.S. birth certificate.
  • Example: TX H 2481. This law specifies that an individual is eligible for an associate auctioneer license if they are a citizen of the U.S. or a legal alien and employed under the direct supervision of a licensed auctioneer.
     

Law Enforcement

Lawmakers in nine states enacted 15 laws: Arizona, California, Nevada, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Washington.

These laws typically pertain to the enforcement of immigration laws, but also include regulations pertaining to those working as notary publics and immigration consultants.

  • Example: AZ S 1271. This law amends existing law permitting construction and maintenance of a secure fence as close as practical to the Arizona-Mexico border, instead of within one mile of the border.  The law allows private or public donations and eliminates the $10 million appropriations from the General Fund. As of July 2014, the Border Security Trust Fund balance was $264,362.
  • Example: CA A 60. This law revises the definition of an immigration reform act to include the presidential executive action announced on Nov. 20, 2014 and any future executive actions. It requires the State Bar to announce and post on its website when any immigration executive action has been issued and makes it unlawful for an attorney to demand or accept advance payment for immigration reform act services in connection with specified immigration acts under federal law. It also clarifies that existing protections against fraud related to immigration reform services apply when that immigration reform arises from executive action, in addition to congressional action.
  • Example: NV A 65. This law adds new language detailing consequences for an employer of a notary public that advertises using the term “notario,” “notario public” or any other equivalent non-English term in any form of communication that advertises notary public services, unless the notary public under his or her employment is an attorney licensed to practice law in this state. If guilty of violating this provision, an employer must immediately remove such language and will be assessed a civil penalty up to $2,000 per violation. This law also adds language to include valid Employment Authorization Document issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services as one of the accepted forms of identification to register to work as a notary public. The registration of one who holds a valid Employment Authorization Document must expire on the date on which that person's employment authorization expires.

Example: VA S 1361. This law authorizes the director, sheriff, or other official in charge of the facility in which an alien is incarcerated to, upon receipt of a detainer from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, transfer custody of the alien to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement no more than five days before the date that he would otherwise be released from custody. Upon transfer of custody, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the alien shall receive credit for the number of days remaining before he would otherwise have been released.
 

Miscellaneous

Lawmakers in seven states enacted 10 laws: Alabama, California, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina and Texas. One additional bill was vetoed.

This category typically includes immigration-related issues that do not fit in other categories and are addressed infrequently, memberships on task forces and commissions, abandoned property and studies.

  • Example: CA S 84. This law establishes a Statewide Director of Immigrant Integration, who will be appointed by and serve the governor. The position’s duties involve leading, planning and coordinating immigrant services and policies in California. The law also creates the Immigrant Integration Fund in the State Treasury, which may be funded by both private and public funds.
  • Example: MN S 888. This law creates three ethnic councils: the Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs includes public members with an ethnic heritage from Mexico, any of the countries in Central or South America, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, or Puerto Rico; the Council for Minnesotans of African Heritage includes public members of black African ancestry; and the Council on Asian-Pacific Minnesotans includes public members with an ethnic heritage from any of the countries east of, and including, Afghanistan or the Pacific Islands. Each council has 15 voting members, 11 of whom are public members appointed by the governor and four of whom are legislators. These councils must work for the implementation of economic, social, legal, and political equality for its constituency, by advising the governor and the Legislature on issues, conducting and reporting studies, and compiling reports, among other duties.
  • Example: TX S 1928. This law requires the executive commissioner to adopt rules ensuring that local government and community input is included in any federal refugee program's placement report. It requires meetings to be held in the communities proposed for refugee placement, with representatives, local governmental entities and officials, and stakeholders in attendance. Resettlement agencies shall consider feedback from these meetings before issuing their annual reports, which shall include specified information, including the number of refugees placed in the state.


Public Benefits

Lawmakers in six states and Puerto Rico enacted eight laws: California, Delaware, Florida, Kansas, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island and Utah.

These laws address social service programs that affect all people covered by the programs—immigrants and non-immigrants alike—and laws that ensure benefits are granted only to eligible immigrants. This year’s laws included child adoption, case management and extended refugee services.

  • Example: KS S 105. This law applies the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA 2008) to support proceedings involving foreign support orders, tribunals or residents.
  • Example: ME S 137. This law clarifies the immigration status of noncitizens eligible for general assistance. Beginning July 1, 2015, “eligible person” means a person who is lawfully present in the U.S. or who is pursuing a lawful process to apply for immigration relief, except that assistance for such a person may not exceed 24 months.
  • Example: RI S 97. This law finds that all homeless people have the right to homeless shelter services regardless of political or religious beliefs, immigration status, former geographic location of residence, ethno-cultural background, disability, gender identity, criminal background, and/or sexual orientation. Homeless shelters should be sensitive to the ethno-specific and linguistic needs of residents. The law creates a committee to establish regulations for homeless shelters.
  • Example: UT S 17. This law adds language to specify that if barred from using federal funds under federal law, the department may provide cash assistance to a legal resident who is not a citizen of the U.S. using funds appropriated from the General Fund.


Voting

Lawmakers in four states enacted four laws: Connecticut, Kansas, North Dakota and Oregon. One additional law was vetoed.

These laws clarify voter registration requirements and valid documents to prove U.S. citizenship.

  • Example: CT H 6366. This law allows an applicant for a “drive only” license to use a foreign-national ID or birth certificate as a secondary proof of identity. It requires “drive only” vehicle operator's licenses to contain language on the back of such license indicating that it cannot be used for voting purposes. For any such license issued prior to July 1, 2016, the language required by this subsection shall be added upon renewal of such license.
  • Example: KS S 34. This law defines “voting without being qualified” as knowingly voting or attempting to vote in any election district when not a lawfully registered voter in such election district; or at any election by a person who is not a U.S. citizen or who does not otherwise meet the qualifications of an elector. Voting without being qualified or attempting to vote without being qualified is a severity level 7, nonperson felony, formerly a class A misdemeanor.
  • Example: ND H 1389. This law provides for a legislative management study during the 2015-16 interim relating to verification of citizenship status for voting, including absentee and mail ballot voting, and for obtaining driver’s licenses. The study also must address the process through which the department of transportation verifies citizenship status in the issuance of driver’s licenses and non-driver identification cards and the feasibility and desirability of requiring the Department of Transportation to include a notation on a driver’s license or non-driver identification card indicating the individual is not a U.S. citizen.

Example: OR H 2177. This law requires the Department of Transportation to provide the Secretary of State electronic records with the legal name, age, residence and citizenship information and electronic signature of each person who may qualify as a voter.


Resolutions

Lawmakers in 27 states and Puerto Rico adopted 238 resolutions: California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Resolutions typically commend citizens, immigrants, and immigrant-serving organizations for their contributions, recognize the cultural heritage of immigrants in a state, and urge Congress or the president of the United States to take certain actions. This year, seven states adopted resolutions encouraged federal action on immigration.

  • Example: GA SR 361. This resolution recognizes the month of April, 2015, as Genocide Prevention and Awareness Month at the Capitol and commends the Georgia Coalition to Prevent Genocide, Eternal-Life Hemshech of Holocaust Survivors, the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust, The Jewish Community Relations Council of Atlanta, The National Center for Civil and Human Rights, The American Jewish Committee Atlanta Regional Office, and ACCESS Atlanta in their efforts to enhance the security and dignity of minority populations across the globe.
  • Example: PR SR 1080. This resolution directs the Senate Committees on the Judiciary, Security and Veterans and Civil Rights, Citizenship and Social Economy to conduct a thorough investigation on the procedures and protocols used by the Puerto Rico Police and Municipal Police intervene when immigrant community residing in Puerto Rico without regard to the immigration status of immigrants.
  • Example: PR SR 1081. This resolution directs the Senate Committee on Health and Nutrition to conduct an investigation into the accessibility of health services available to the immigrant community residing in Puerto Rico, irrespective of the immigration status of the person; analyzes the extension of health services to the immigrant population in the island; determines the characteristics and needs faced by immigrants in Puerto Rico by the lack of access to health services because of their immigration status.
  • Example: PR SR 1118. This resolution directs the Senate Committee on Women's Affairs to conduct a forum for immigrant women in Puerto Rico, analyzes the extent of services available to immigrant women and learn about the needs of this population.
  • Example: SC H 3961. This memorial requests the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide information regarding the resettlement of refugees in Spartanburg, SC to ensure accountability and transparency of the expenditure of public funds and other costs of providing government services.
  • Example: SC H 3980. This resolution memorializes the South Carolina Department of Social Services to provide information regarding the resettlement of refugees in Spartanburg, SC to ensure accountability and transparency of the expenditure of public funds and other costs of providing government services.
  • Example: CA SJR 2. This resolution urges Congress and the president of the United States to work together to pass comprehensive immigration reform.
  • Example: HI HCR 208. This resolution urges Congress and the U.S. Department of the Interior to restore federal healthcare funding for residents present under the compacts of free association.
  • Example: LA SCR 66. This resolution memorializes U.S. Congress to take action against illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing in Louisiana's sovereign waters by passing H.R. 774, the Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated Fishing Enforcement Act of 2015. This act further provides that vessels involved with illegal fishing are also associated with other crimes, including drug trafficking, human trafficking and illegal immigration, and the incursion by these foreign fishing vessels into U.S. waters constitutes a violation of U.S. sovereignty.
  • Example: MI HR 9. This resolution urges the president of the United States to allow an additional 25,000 refugee visas for displaced Iraqis, with preference for placement in state.
  • Example: NM HM 72. This resolution requests the president of the United States and members of the New Mexico congressional delegation to consider alternatives to the detainment of immigrant families seeking asylum in this country.
  • Example: NV SJR 21. This resolution urges Congress to enact comprehensive immigration reform.
  • Example: TX HR 1605. This resolution expresses a commitment to the elimination of illegal fishing and urges Congress to take action to end illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in sovereign waters. It adds that vessels involved with illegal fishing are also associated with other crimes, including drug trafficking, human trafficking, and illegal immigration.
  • Example: TX SCR 5. This resolution urges Congress to reimburse the state for bearing the financial burden of the federal government's responsibility to secure the state-Mexico international border.
     

Additional Resources



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Prepared by:

Ann Morse, program director, Immigrant Policy Project, NCSL
Gilberto Soria Mendoza, policy specialist, Immigrant Policy Project, NCSL
Leila Malow, 2015 Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellow
Hannah Weigle, 2015 Summer Immigrant Policy Fellow
 

Reviewers:

Molly Ramsdell, director, Washington Office, NCSL
Neal Osten, director, Washington Office, NCSL

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, July 2015