2021 Campaign Finance Enactments

1/5/2022

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In 2021, 49 states introduced more than 600 campaign finance bills, and 27 states enacted 72 bills. This webpage highlights the 2021 campaign finance enactments and includes summaries of enactments relating to:

The sections below are organized by topic, and at the bottom is a list of enactments by state. For detailed information on all campaign finance legislation, including pending legislation, please see our campaign finance legislation database.

Note: a few bills have specific effective dates listed. For those bills that do not specify an effective date, they become effective based upon each state’s rules governing the effective dates of new laws.  

Highlights:

  • Delaware SB 177 and Montana SB 224 increased their thresholds for contributions or expenditures, while Hawaii SB 404 lowered its thresholds.
  • California AB 319 and Idaho HB 245 prohibited a foreign government or foreign nationals from making contributions, independent expenditures or electioneering communications, directly or indirectly, to any candidate, political committee or measure.
  • Georgia SB 221 and Maine SB 467 defined or addressed leadership committees.
  • Arkansas HB 1372 and Maine HB 1099 revised their definitions of carryover funds, independent expenditures and political action committees.
  • Arkansas HB 1728, Connecticut SB 883, Delaware HB 90, District of Columbia B 312, Montana HB 221, Rhode Island SB 60 and HB 5289, Vermont HB 10 and West Virginia HB 2927 addressed permissible expenditures, such as the use of campaign funds for child care and caregiving expenses.

Enactments by topics

Contribution limits

Arkansas SB 383 adjusts the maximum campaign contribution level established by the Arkansas Ethics Commission at the beginning of each odd-numbered year in an amount equal to the percentage certified to the Federal Election Commission for federal campaigns.

Arkansas SB 384 prohibits any person from making a contribution to a candidate that in the aggregate exceeds $2,700 per election. The bill goes into effect Jan. 1, 2023.

Delaware SB 177 increases the contribution or expenditure threshold from $2,000 to $5,000 for requiring a candidate to form a candidate committee or file a statement of organization with the State Election Commissioner.

Florida SB 1890 establishes a $3,000 contribution limit for contributions made to political committees sponsoring a constitutional amendment proposed by initiative. The bill also prohibits local governments from enacting or adopting contribution limitations or restrictions that differ from the state’s limits.

Hawaii SB 405 requires that any candidate, candidate committee or noncandidate committee that receives contributions more than the contribution limits by nonresidents of Hawaii return any excess contributions to the contributor within 30 days after the election period.

Idaho HB 243 allows a candidate for a state legislative office to transfer the balance of funds to that candidate's new campaign account for a different state legislative office when terminating his or her campaign account. Any contributions received in the closed account, combined with any contributions received in the new account, will count toward the state’s contribution limits when received from the same contributor for the same election.

Louisiana SB 4 removes the limitation on combined contributions for both the primary and general elections that may be accepted by any candidate and subsidiary campaign committees from a political committee. The limitation had been $80,000 for major office candidates, $60,000 for district office candidates and $20,000 for other office candidates.

Maine SB 467 defines leadership political action committee and separate segregated fund committees. It allows a party committee, a leadership political action committee, a separate segregated fund committee, a caucus political action committee and any other political action committee to make contributions that do not exceed more than the amount that a committee may contribute to a legislative candidate in any election. This law goes into effect Jan. 1, 2023.

Disclosure

Arizona SB 1104 requires contributions exceeding $100 from in-state individuals be included in a campaign finance report. Any contributions from out-of-state individuals must disclose the identity of the contributor’s occupation and employer. Also, the bill clarifies that all disbursements in excess of $250 during the reporting period be itemized and include the recipient’s name, address, date, amount and description.

Arizona SB 1714 requires a political action committee (PAC)  that makes an advertisement expenditure to disclose the names of the three largest aggregate contributors if those aggregate contributions exceed $20,000. The PAC must provide the aggregate percentage of out-of-state contributors as calculated at the time the advertisement was produced for publication, delivery, display or broadcast.

Arkansas SB 138 disallows any prohibited political action committee from making a contribution to another political action committee. The bill further requires that any financial institution receiving contributions or making expenditures on a candidate's behalf be disclosed to the secretary of state, though that information will not be made publicly available.

California SB 686 requires a limited liability company (LLC) that is engaged in campaign activity to file a statement of members with the secretary of state. The LLC must disclose each member whose membership interest is equal to or greater than 10% of the total outstanding membership interests or who has made a cumulative capital contribution of $10,000 or more.

Hawaii SB 404 lowers the threshold that triggers disclosures for electioneering communication expenditures from 2,000 to $1,000 during any calendar year.

Idaho HB 104 requires each person who makes independent expenditures in an aggregate amount exceeding $100 in support of or in opposition to any candidate or measure to identify the candidate or measure, as well as whether the expenditure was made either in support of or in opposition to such candidate or measure.

Montana SB 224 increases the campaign finance disclosure threshold from $30 to $50 and prohibits the commissioner of political practices from requesting additional information in disclosure reports.

Nevada AB 166 requires a person, political action committee, political party or committee that spends more than $100 for a text message that expressly advocates the election or defeat of a candidate or group of candidates or solicits a contribution to disclose in the text message the name of the person or group that paid for the communication.

Enforcement

Alabama HB 154 requires all campaign finance reports and statements to be filed electronically, without exception, with the secretary of state.

Arizona SB 1714 requires a political action committee (PAC) that makes an advertisement expenditure to disclose the names of the three largest aggregate contributors if those aggregate contributions exceed $20,000. The PAC must provide the aggregate percentage of out-of-state contributors as calculated at the time the advertisement was produced for publication, delivery, display or broadcast.

Arkansas SB 699 requires the secretary of state to develop an updated and simplified electronic campaign finance online reporting system and electronic reporting forms by Jan. 1, 2022.

California AB 1367 increases the penalties for egregious personal use of campaign funds to two times the amount of the unlawful expenditure. Egregious personal benefit means a direct personal benefit with a total value of $10,000 or more to a candidate, elected officer or individuals with authority to approve the expenditure of campaign funds.

California AB 1590 requires a committee to file a statement of organization and pay a $50 annual fee to the secretary of state. If the committee fails to timely pay the annual fee, it will be subject to an administrative penalty of $150.

Delaware SB 176 permits the state elections commissioner to issue a citation for failure to file or deliver a required campaign finance report. The penalty is $50 for each day the report is tardy, up to a maximum of 100 days. It also requires the commissioner to publish the candidate’s name who failed to file a campaign finance report or has been assessed a penalty.

Hawaii SB 400 increases the fine that may apply if a candidate or noncandidate committee fails file a preliminary primary or general report due 10 days before the primary or general election. The fine will not exceed 25% of the total amount of contributions or expenditures, whichever is greater, for the period covered by the report and it will not exceed $300 per day.

Hawaii SB 402 requires the reporting of expenditures by candidate committees made to reimburse consultants, advertising agencies and similar firms, credit card payments, salaries, and other committee reimbursements.

Idaho HB 245 prohibits any foreign national from making contributions, independent expenditures and electioneering communications, directly or indirectly, to any candidate, political committee or measure. It also allows Idaho to prosecute any violations under this new section.

Montana SB 130 requires the Commissioner of Political Practices to post to the commissioner’s website a written response to a complaint alleging a campaign finance violation.

New Hampshire HB 263 increases the expenditure and contribution reporting threshold for all political entities and modifies the maximum contribution amount a person may contribute to candidate committees and political committees. The bill also modifies the penalties associated with political expenditures and contributions.

Rhode Island SB 193 and HB 6454 require all penalties or restitution payments for larceny of a campaign account or campaign expenditure be deposited into the Rhode Island crime victim compensation program fund.

Tennessee SB 626 allows the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance to retain private outside counsel, rather than filing a petition through the attorney general, to pursue the collection of unpaid civil penalties assessed by order of the registry.  

Tennessee SB 1120 provides that if a civil penalty assessed against a multicandidate committee is not paid within 30 days after it becomes final, the officers of the multicandidate committee at the time of the penalized conduct are ineligible to qualify for election to a state or local public office until the penalty is paid.

Political Action Committees

Arizona SB 1714 requires a political action committee (PAC)  that makes an advertisement expenditure to disclose the names of the three largest aggregate contributors if those aggregate contributions exceed $20,000. The PAC must provide the aggregate percentage of out-of-state contributors as calculated at the time the advertisement was produced for publication, delivery, display or broadcast.

Arkansas SB 138 disallows any prohibited political action committee from making a contribution to another political action committee.

Maine SB 467 defines leadership political action committee and separate segregated fund committees. It allows a party committee, a leadership political action committee, a separate segregated fund committee, a caucus political action committee and any other political action committee to make contributions that do not exceed more than the amount that a committee may contribute to a legislative candidate in any election. This law goes into effect Jan. 1, 2023.

Maine SB 514 prohibits a political action committee or a ballot question committee from compensating, reimbursing, loaning or giving anything of value to a legislator or a legislator’s immediate family for services provided to the committee that are determined by the Commission on Governmental Ethics and Election Practices to be for personal financial enrichment.

Maine HB 1099 revises the definitions of a political action committee (PAC), ballot question committee and leadership political action committee. A PAC is any corporation, membership organization or labor organization that receives contributions or makes expenditures aggregating more than $2,500 in a calendar year for the purpose of influencing the nomination or election of any candidate. A ballot question committee means a person that receives contributions or makes expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000 for the purpose of initiating or influencing a campaign, other than a campaign for the nomination or election of a candidate. A leadership PAC is defined as a political action committee, other than a caucus political action committee, that was directly or indirectly established by a current member of the legislature or that is directly or indirectly maintained or controlled by a current member of the legislature.

Nevada AB 166 requires a person, political action committee, political party or committee that spends more than $100 for a text message that expressly advocates the election or defeat of a candidate or group of candidates or solicits a contribution to disclose in the text message the name of the person or group that paid for the communication.

Public Financing

Connecticut SB 883 requires the State Elections Enforcement Commission to amend the regulations governing the Citizens’ Election Program, the state’s voluntary public campaign financing program, to permit child care service expenditures using Citizens’ Election funds.

Maine HB 1011 states that a legislative or gubernatorial candidate who has accepted contributions that do not comply with the seed money restrictions of the Maine Clean Election Act may not be certified as a Maine Clean Election Act candidate during the same election cycle.

Maryland SB 415 modifies the Public Financing Act by changing the qualifying requirements and matching contributions for gubernatorial candidates.

New Mexico SB 160 changes the number of qualifying contributions a district judge candidate must receive before qualifying for public financing. Candidates qualify by receiving contributions of exactly $5 from a number of voters equal to 0.1% of the number of voters in the state.

Reporting

Alabama HB 154 requires all campaign finance reports and statements to be filed electronically, without exception, with the secretary of state.

Delaware SB 177 increases the contribution or expenditure threshold from $2,000 to $5,000 for requiring a candidate to form a candidate committee or file a statement of organization with the State Election Commissioner.  

Hawaii SB 200 requires any candidate receiving contributions from any person aggregating more than $500, within the period of 14 days through 4 days before any election, to file a late contribution report. 

Maryland SB 310 requires elected officials or candidates to pay all outstanding debts, terminate and file a final campaign finance report within eight years after either the end of the individual’s most recent term of office or the date of the election in which the individual last was a candidate.

Maryland HB 1350 allows for campaign finance disbursements to be approved by, rather than made by, the treasurer. The bill also requires campaign finance entities liable for specified civil penalties to submit bank statements with their campaign finance reports.

Montana HB 71 revises the reporting deadlines for municipal candidates and political committees. A municipal candidate in an odd-numbered year election will file reports on the 20th day of June, July, August, September, October and November. A political committee that participates in a municipal election held in an odd-numbered year will file reports on the 30th day of June, July, August, September, October and November.

Montana SB 224 increases the aggregate contributions limits by a political committee or individual to candidates. It also provides that the act of hosting a fundraising reception or other political event is not, in itself, considered a contribution.

Montana SB 319 allows for the creation of joint fundraising committees between  one or more candidates for a statewide office and political committees. It requires them to file committee finance reports with the commissioner of political practices.

Montana HB 689 requires a political committee who either leases office space from the state or from the Montana University system to file a report if that committee has more than $5,000 in expenditures in a year. That committee must submit the report to the Legislative Services Division by April 1 of the succeeding year. The bill also revises the reporting requirements for religious organizations for those communications that are not distributed to the general public. 

Nevada AB 441 allows a legislator, who was appointed to fill a vacancy during a certain period, to solicit or accept a monetary contribution from another legislator or from an organization whose primary purpose is to provide support for legislators of a particular political party and house. The bill prohibits the appointed legislator from soliciting or accepting monetary contributions in a total amount exceeding $10,000 for a regular session and $1,200 for a special session.

New Hampshire HB 263 increases the expenditure and contribution reporting threshold for all political entities and modifies the maximum contribution amount a person may contribute to candidate committees and political committees. Any political committee whose receipts or expenditures exceed $1,000 will file an itemized statement with the secretary of state.

Texas SB 1761 requires campaign finance reports to be filed electronically, by fax or in person with the Texas Ethics Commission.

Utah SB 92 increases the reporting requirements for contributions, expenditures reports and anonymous contributions.

Virginia SB 1444 requires that any contribution of $1,000 or more be reported for any candidate for a statewide office or the General Assembly. Any contribution received or reported by the candidate or treasurer during the period beginning Jan. 1 and ending on the day immediately before the General Assembly’s first day of a regular session must be reported to the State Board of Elections not later than Jan. 15.

Use of Campaign Funds

Arkansas SB 183 prohibits a candidate from using campaign or carryover funds to pay a fine levied by the Arkansas Ethics Commission.

Arkansas HB 1675 allows campaign funds to be maintained after an election and used to run for election or re-election. Personal use of campaign funds remains prohibited for expenses unless the expenses relate to a future candidacy. If a candidate keeps remaining campaign funds after an election, the candidate must continue filing reports.

Arkansas HB 1728 allows the use of campaign funds to pay a candidate's child care expenses if the campaign funds are used when the candidate is engaging in campaign activity and the child care expenses would not exist in the absence of the campaign.

Connecticut SB 883 requires the State Elections Enforcement Commission to amend the regulations governing the Citizens’ Election Program, the state’s voluntary public campaign financing program, to permit child care service expenditures using Citizens’ Election funds.

Delaware HB 90 allows the reasonable use of campaign funds for the care of the candidate’s child or children incurred in connection with the candidate’s campaign activities.

District of Columbia B 312 allows a candidate to make expenditures to reimburse the candidate for the candidate’s child care expenses incurred for campaign purposes.

District of Columbia B 313 amends the Board of Ethics and Government Accountability Establishment and Comprehensive Ethics Reform Amendment Act of 2011 to explicitly provide that candidates may make expenditures for child care expenses incurred for campaign purposes.

Florida SB 1890 prohibits a candidate from donating surplus funds to a charitable organization that employs the candidate.

Idaho HB 243 allows a candidate for a state legislative office to transfer the balance of funds in their campaign account to that candidate's new campaign account for a different state legislative office when terminating his or her campaign account. Any contributions received in the closed account, combined with any contributions received in the new account, will count toward the state’s contribution limits when received from the same contributor for the same election.

Montana HB 221 allows campaign contributions to be used to pay for the candidate’s child care expenses while engaged in campaign activity. The bill requires the reporting of child care expenses with campaign contributions, provides that in-kind child care is not a contribution and prohibits campaign contributions to be used for child care after the candidate files its closing report. 

Montana SB 226 revises the laws related to loans made by a candidate to the candidate’s campaign. If a candidate has primary election debt consisting solely of loans from the candidate and if the candidate advances to the general election, the candidate loan may be repaid from either the primary or general election funds.

Nevada AB 441 allows a legislator, who was appointed to fill a vacancy during a certain period, to solicit or accept a monetary contribution from another legislator or from an organization whose primary purpose is to provide support for legislators of a particular political party and house. The bill prohibits the appointed legislator from soliciting or accepting monetary contributions in a total amount exceeding $10,000 for a regular session and $1,200 for a special session.

Rhode Island SB 60 and HB 5289 allow campaign funds to be used for child care expenses that are incurred as a result of campaign activity or officeholder's responsibilities.

Utah SB 92 expands those clothing and food expenses that are not considered personal use expenditures.

Vermont HB 10 expands permitted candidate expenditures to include expenses for the care of a dependent family member incurred as a direct result of campaign activity.

West Virginia HB 2927 allows the use of campaign funds to pay for a candidate's caregiving expenses. Caregiving services includes the direct care, protection and supervision of a child or other person with a disability or a medical condition for whom a candidate has direct caregiving responsibility.

Miscellaneous

Arkansas HB 1372 amends the definition of carryover funds by adding a subsection. Carryover funds means the amount of campaign funds retained from the last election by the candidate for future use but cannot exceed the office’s annual salary. If the office sought does not have an annual salary, carryover funds are limited to $3,000 or less. 

California AB 319 prohibits a foreign government or foreign principal from making a contribution or expenditure in connection with a ballot measure. It also prohibits a person or committee from soliciting or accepting contributions from a foreign government or principal and prohibits any expenditures in connection with an election to state or local office.

Florida SB 82 creates a sponsorship disclaimer policy for most text message political advertisements, independent expenditures and electioneering communications. Text messages must carry a disclaimer, URL address or hyperlink to a website containing the disclaimer. The bill exempts text messages sent by individuals not being paid and without the assistance of mass distribution technology and those messages that require the recipient to sign up or opt in to receive them.

Georgia SB 221 provides for leadership committees and defines them as a committee, corporation or organization chaired by the governor, the lieutenant governor or the nominee of a political party for governor or lieutenant governor. These committees may receive contributions and make expenditures and the bill provides an exception from contribution limits.

Idaho HB 245 prohibits any foreign national from making contributions, independent expenditures and electioneering communications, directly or indirectly, to any candidate, political committee or measure. It also allows Idaho to prosecute any violations under this new section.

Maine SB 514 prohibits a political action committee or a ballot question committee from compensating, reimbursing, loaning or giving anything of value to a legislator or a legislator’s immediate family for services provided to the committee that are determined by the Commission on Governmental Ethics and Election Practices to be for personal financial enrichment.

Maine HB 1011 clarifies that an independent expenditure is an expenditure that is not made in cooperation, in consultation or concert with, or at the request or suggestion of a candidate, a candidate's authorized political committee or an agent of either.

Maine HB 1099 revises the definitions of a political action committee (PAC), ballot question committee and leadership political action committee. A PAC is any corporation, membership organization or labor organization that receives contributions or makes expenditures aggregating more than $2,500 in a calendar year for the purpose of influencing the nomination or election of any candidate. A ballot question committee means a person that receives contributions or makes expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000 for the purpose of initiating or influencing a campaign, other than a campaign for the nomination or election of a candidate. A leadership PAC is defined as a political action committee, other than a caucus political action committee, that was directly or indirectly established by a current member of the legislature or that is directly or indirectly maintained or controlled by a current member of the legislature.

Montana SB 319 requires that any student organization that is required to register as a political committee and is funded by student fees must make the fee be an opt-in fee.

Tennessee SB 44 extends the termination date of the Bureau of Ethics and Campaign Finance to June 30, 2027.

West Virginia HB 2009 prohibits any person from coercing or intimidating any employee into making a political contribution or engaging in any form of political activity. Also, it prohibits employers from withholding or diverting any portion of employees’ wages or salary for political activities on behalf of a union or other organization without express written authorization by the employee.

Enactments by states

Alabama

HB 154 requires all campaign finance reports and statements to be filed electronically, without exception, with the secretary of state.

Arizona

SB 1104 requires contributions exceeding $100 from in-state individuals be included in a campaign finance report. Any contributions from out-of-state individuals must disclose the identity of the contributor’s occupation and employer. Also, the bill clarifies that all disbursements in excess of $250 during the reporting period be itemized and include the recipient’s name, address, date, amount and description.

SB 1714 requires a political action committee (PAC) that makes an advertisement expenditure to disclose the names of the three largest aggregate contributors if those aggregate contributions exceed $20,000. The PAC must provide the aggregate percentage of out-of-state contributors as calculated at the time the advertisement was produced for publication, delivery, display or broadcast.

 Arkansas

SB 138 disallows any prohibited political action committee from making a contribution to another political action committee. The bill further requires that any financial institution receiving contributions or making expenditures on a candidate's behalf be disclosed to the secretary of state, though that information will not be made publicly available.

SB 183 prohibits a candidate from using campaign or carryover funds to pay a fine by the Arkansas Ethics Commission.

SB 383 adjusts the maximum campaign contribution level established by the Arkansas Ethics Commission at the beginning of each odd-numbered year in an amount equal to the percentage certified to the Federal Election Commission for federal campaigns.

SB 384 prohibits any person from making a contribution to a candidate that in the aggregate exceeds $2,700 per election. The bill goes into effect Jan. 1, 2023.

SB 699 requires the secretary of state to develop an updated and simplified electronic campaign finance online reporting system and electronic reporting forms by Jan. 1, 2022.

HB 1372 amends the definition of carryover funds by adding a subsection. Carryover funds means the amount of campaign funds retained from the last election by the candidate for future use but cannot exceed the office’s annual salary. If the office sought does not have an annual salary, carryover funds are limited to $3,000 or less. 

HB 1675 allows campaign funds to be maintained after an election and used to run for election or re-election. Personal use of campaign funds remains prohibited for expenses unless the expenses relate to a future candidacy. If a candidate keeps remaining campaign funds after an election, the candidate must continue filing reports.

HB 1728 allows the use of campaign funds to pay a candidate's child care expenses if the campaign funds are used when the candidate is engaging in campaign activity and the child care expenses would not exist in the absence of the campaign.

California

AB 319 prohibits a foreign government or foreign principal from making a contribution or expenditure in connection with a ballot measure. It also prohibits a person or committee from soliciting or accepting contributions from a foreign government or principal and prohibits any expenditures in connection with an election to state or local office.

SB 686 requires a limited liability company (LLC) that is engaged in campaign activity to file a statement of members with the secretary of state. The LLC must disclose each member whose membership interest is equal to or greater than 10% of the total outstanding membership interests or who has made a cumulative capital contribution of $10,000 or more.

AB 1367 increases the penalties for egregious personal use of campaign funds to two times the amount of the unlawful expenditure. Egregious personal benefit means a direct personal benefit with a total value of $10,000 or more to a candidate, elected officer, or individuals with authority to approve the expenditure of campaign funds.

AB 1590 requires a committee to file a statement of organization and pay a $50 annual fee to the secretary of state. If the committee fails to timely pay the annual fee, it will be subject to an administrative penalty of $150.

Connecticut

SB 883 requires the State Elections Enforcement Commission to amend the regulations governing the Citizens’ Election Program, the state’s voluntary public campaign financing program, to permit child care service expenditures using Citizens’ Election funds.

HB 90 allows the reasonable use of campaign funds for the care of the candidate’s child or children incurred in connection with the candidate’s campaign activities.

SB 176 permits the state elections commissioner to issue a citation for failure to file or deliver a required campaign finance report. The penalty is $50 for each day the report is tardy, up to a maximum of 100 days. It also requires the commissioner to publish the candidate’s name who failed to file a campaign finance report or has been assessed a penalty.

SB 177 increases the contribution or expenditure threshold from $2,000 to $5,000 for requiring a candidate to form a candidate committee or file a statement of organization with the State Election Commissioner.

District of Columbia

B 312 allows a candidate to make expenditures to reimburse the candidate for the candidate’s child care expenses incurred for campaign purposes.

B 313 amends the Board of Ethics and Government Accountability Establishment and Comprehensive Ethics Reform Amendment Act of 2011 to explicitly provide that candidates may make expenditures for child care expenses incurred for campaign purposes.

Florida

SB 82 creates a sponsorship disclaimer policy for most text message political advertisements, independent expenditures and electioneering communications. Text messages must carry a disclaimer, URL address or hyperlink to a website containing the disclaimer. The bill exempts text messages sent by individuals not being paid and without the assistance of mass distribution technology and those messages that require the recipient to sign up or opt in to receive them.

SB 1890 establishes a $3,000 contribution limit for contributions made to political committees sponsoring a constitutional amendment proposed by initiative. The bill prohibits local governments from enacting or adopting contribution limitations or restrictions that differ from the state’s limits. It also prohibits a candidate from donating surplus funds to a charitable organization that employs the candidate.

Georgia

SB 221 provides for leadership committees and defines them as a committee, corporation or organization chaired by the governor, the lieutenant governor or the nominee of a political party for governor or lieutenant governor. These committees may receive contributions and make expenditures and the bill provides an exception from contribution limits.

Hawaii

SB 200 requires any candidate receiving contributions from any person aggregating more than $500, within the period of 14 days through 4 days before any election, to file a late contribution report. 

SB 400 increases the fine that may apply if a candidate or noncandidate committee fails file a preliminary primary or general report due 10 days before the primary or general election. The fine will not exceed 25% of the total amount of contributions or expenditures, whichever is greater, for the period covered by the report and it will not exceed $300 per day.

SB 402 requires the reporting of expenditures by candidate committees made to reimburse consultants, advertising agencies and similar firms, credit card payments, salaries, and other committee reimbursements.

SB 404 lowers the threshold that triggers disclosures for electioneering communication expenditures from 2,000 to $1,000 during any calendar year.

SB 405 requires that any candidate, candidate committee or noncandidate committee that receives contributions more than the contribution limits by nonresidents of Hawaii return any excess contributions to the contributor within 30 days after the election period.

Idaho

HB 104 requires each person who makes independent expenditures in an aggregate amount exceeding $100 in support of or in opposition to any candidate or measure to identify the candidate or measure, as well as whether the expenditure was made either in support of or in opposition to such candidate or measure.

HB 243 allows a candidate for a state legislative office to transfer the balance of funds to that candidate's new campaign account for a different state legislative office when terminating his or her campaign account. Any contributions received in the closed account, combined with any contributions received in the new account, will count toward the state’s contribution limits when received from the same contributor for the same election.

HB 245 prohibits any foreign national from making contributions, independent expenditures and electioneering communications, directly or indirectly, to any candidate, political committee or measure. It also allows Idaho to prosecute any violations under this new section.

Louisiana

SB 4 removes the limitation on combined contributions for both the primary and general elections that may be accepted by any candidate and subsidiary campaign committees from a political committee. The limitation had been $80,000 for major office candidates, $60,000 for district office candidates and $20,000 for other office candidates.  

Maine

SB 467 defines leadership political action committee and separate segregated fund committees. It allows a party committee, a leadership political action committee, a separate segregated fund committee, a caucus political action committee and any other political action committee to make contributions that do not exceed more than the amount that a committee may contribute to a legislative candidate in any election. This law goes into effect Jan. 1, 2023.

SB 514 prohibits a political action committee or a ballot question committee from compensating, reimbursing, loaning or giving anything of value to a legislator or a legislator’s immediate family for services provided to the committee that are determined by the Commission on Governmental Ethics and Election Practices to be for personal financial enrichment.

HB 1011 clarifies that an independent expenditure is an expenditure not made in cooperation, consultation or concert with, or at the request or suggestion of, a candidate, a candidate's authorized political committee or an agent of either. It also states that a legislative or gubernatorial candidate who has accepted contributions that do not comply with the seed money restrictions of the Maine Clean Election Act may not be certified as a Maine Clean Election Act candidate during the same election cycle.

HB 1099 revises the definitions of a political action committee (PAC), ballot question committee and leadership political action committee. A PAC is any corporation, membership organization or labor organization that receives contributions or makes expenditures aggregating more than $2,500 in a calendar year for the purpose of influencing the nomination or election of any candidate. A ballot question committee means a person that receives contributions or makes expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000 for the purpose of initiating or influencing a campaign, other than a campaign for the nomination or election of a candidate. A leadership PAC is defined as a political action committee, other than a caucus political action committee, that was directly or indirectly established by a current member of the legislature or that is directly or indirectly maintained or controlled by a current member of the legislature.

Maryland

SB 310 requires elected officials or candidates to pay all outstanding debts, terminate and file a final campaign finance report within eight years after either the end of the individual’s most recent term of office or the date of the election in which the individual last was a candidate.

SB 415 modifies the Public Financing Act by changing the qualifying requirements and matching contributions for gubernatorial candidates.

HB 1350 allows for campaign finance disbursements to be approved by, rather than made by, the treasurer. The bill also requires campaign finance entities liable for specified civil penalties to submit bank statements with their campaign finance reports.

Montana

HB 71 revises the reporting deadlines for municipal candidates and political committees. A municipal candidate in an odd-numbered year election will file reports on the 20th day of June, July, August, September, October and November. A political committee that participates in a municipal election held in an odd-numbered year will file reports on the 30th day of June, July, August, September, October and November.

SB 130 requires the Commissioner of Political Practices to post to the commissioner’s website a written response to a complaint alleging a campaign finance violation.

HB 221 allows campaign contributions to be used to pay for the candidate’s child care expenses while engaged in campaign activity. The bill requires the reporting of child care expenses with campaign contributions, provides that in-kind child care is not a contribution and prohibits campaign contributions to be used for child care after the candidate files its closing report.

SB 224 increases the campaign finance disclosure threshold from $30 to $50 and prohibits the commissioner of political practices from requesting additional information in disclosure reports. The bill increases the aggregate contributions limits by a political committee or individual to candidates. It also provides that the act of hosting a fundraising reception or other political event is not, in itself, considered a contribution.

SB 226 revises the laws related to loans made by a candidate to the candidate’s campaign. If a candidate has primary election debt consisting solely of loans from the candidate and if the candidate advances to the general election, the candidate loan may be repaid from either the primary or general election funds.

SB 319 allows for the creation of joint fundraising committees between  one or more candidates for a statewide office and political committees. It requires them to file committee finance reports with the commissioner of political practices. The bill also requires that any student organization that is required to register as a political committee and is funded by student fees must make the fee be an opt-in fee.

HB 689 requires a political committee who either leases office space from the state or from the Montana University system to file a report if that committee has more than $5,000 in expenditures in a year. That committee must submit the report to the Legislative Services Division by April 1 of the succeeding year. The bill also revises the reporting requirements for religious organizations for those communications that are not distributed to the general public. 

Nevada

AB 166 requires a person, political action committee, political party or committee that spends more than $100 for a text message that expressly advocates the election or defeat of a candidate or group of candidates or solicits a contribution to disclose in the text message the name of the person or group that paid for the communication.

AB 441 allows a legislator, who was appointed to fill a vacancy during a certain period, to solicit or accept a monetary contribution from another legislator or from an organization whose primary purpose is to provide support for legislators of a particular political party and house. The bill prohibits the appointed legislator from soliciting or accepting monetary contributions in a total amount exceeding $10,000 for a regular session and $1,200 for a special session.

New Hampshire

HB 263 increases the expenditure and contribution reporting threshold for all political entities and modifies the maximum amount a person may contribute to candidate committees and political committees. Any political committee whose receipts or expenditures exceed $1,000 will file an itemized statement with the secretary of state.  The bill also modifies the penalties associated with political expenditures and contributions.

New Mexico

SB 160 changes the number of qualifying contributions a district judge candidate must receive before qualifying for public financing. Candidates qualify by receiving contributions of exactly $5 from a number of voters equal to 0.1% of the number of voters in the state.

Rhode Island

SB 60 and HB 5289 allows campaign funds to be used for child care expenses incurred as a result of campaign activity or officeholder's responsibilities.

SB 193 and HB 6454 require all penalties or restitution payments for larceny of a campaign account or campaign expenditure be deposited into the Rhode Island crime victim compensation program fund.

Tennessee

SB 44 extends the termination date of the Bureau of Ethics and Campaign Finance to June 30, 2027.

SB 626 allows the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance to retain private outside counsel, rather than filing a petition through the attorney general, to pursue the collection of unpaid civil penalties assessed by order of the registry. 

SB 1120 provides that if a civil penalty assessed against a multicandidate committee is not paid within 30 days after it becomes final, the officers of the multicandidate committee at the time of the penalized conduct are ineligible to qualify for election to a state or local public office until the penalty is paid.

Texas

SB 1761 requires campaign finance reports to be filed electronically, by fax or in person with the Texas Ethics Commission.

Utah

SB 92 expands those clothing and food expenses that are not considered personal use expenditures. The bill also increases the reporting requirements for contributions, expenditures reports and anonymous contributions.

Vermont

HB 10 expands permitted candidate expenditures to include expenses for the care of a dependent family member incurred as a direct result of campaign activity.

Virginia

SB 1444 requires that any contribution of $1,000 or more be reported for any candidate for a statewide office or General Assembly. Any contribution received or reported by the candidate or treasurer during the period beginning Jan. 1 and ending on the day immediately before the General Assembly’s first day of a regular session must be reported to the State Board of Elections not later than Jan. 15.

West Virginia
 

HB 2009 prohibits any person from coercing or intimidating any employee into making a political contribution or engaging in any form of political activity. Also, it prohibits employers from withholding or diverting any portion of employees’ wages or salary for political activities on behalf of a union or other organization without express written authorization by the employee.

HB 2927 allows the use of campaign funds to pay for a candidate's caregiving expenses. Caregiving services includes the direct care, protection and supervision of a child or other person with a disability or a medical condition for whom a candidate has direct caregiving responsibility.

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