State Constitutional and Statutory Provisions for Term Limits

Click the state below to see the Constitutional or statutory provisions in that state.

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Florida

Idaho

Louisiana

Maine

Massachusetts

Michigan

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

South Dakota

Utah

Washington

Wyoming

     
 

Arizona

Arizona Constitution, Article 4, Part 2, § 21.
Term limits of members of state legislature.

The members of the first legislature shall hold office until the first Monday in January, 1913. The terms of office of the members of succeeding legislatures shall be two years. No state senator shall serve more than four consecutive terms in that office, nor shall any state representative serve more than four consecutive terms in that office. This limitation on the number of terms of consecutive service shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1993. No legislator, after serving the maximum number of terms, which shall include any part of a term served, may serve in the same office until he has been out of office for no less than one full term.

Arkansas

Constitution of the State of Arkansas of 1874, Amendment 73.
Arkansas Term Limitation Amendment.

Preamble: The people of Arkansas find and declare that elected officials who remain in office too long become preoccupied with reelection and ignore their duties as representatives of the people. Entrenched incumbency has reduced voter participation and has led to an electoral system that is less free, less competitive, and less representative than the system established by the Founding Fathers. Therefore, the people of Arkansas, exercising their reserved powers, herein limit the terms of elected officials.

(a) The Arkansas House of Representatives shall consist of members to be chosen every second year by the qualified electors of the several counties.

(b) The Arkansas Senate shall consist of members to be chosen every four years by the qualified electors of the several districts.

(c)(1) A member of the General Assembly shall serve no more than sixteen (16) years, whether consecutive or nonconsecutive. (2) A member who completes his or her sixteenth year of service during a term of office for which he or she has been elected may serve until the completion of that term of office.

(3) The years of service in both the Senate and the House of Representatives shall be added together and included to determine the total number of years in office.

(4) A partial legislative term served as a result of a special election under Article 5, § 6, or a two-year term served as a result of apportionment of the Senate shall not be included in calculating the total number of years served by a member of the General Assembly.

[As amended by Const. Amend. 94, effective November 5, 2014.]

Sec. 1. Executive Branch.

(a) The Executive Department of this State shall consist of a Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer of State, Auditor of State, Attorney General, and Commissioner of State Lands, all of whom shall keep their offices at the seat of government, and hold their offices for the term of four years, and until their successors are elected and qualified.

(b) No elected officials of the Executive Department of this State may serve in the same office more than two such four year terms.

Sec. 2. Legislative Branch.

(a) The Arkansas House of Representatives shall consist of members to be chosen every second year by the qualified electors of the several counties. No member of the Arkansas House of Representatives may serve more than three such two year terms.

(b) The Arkansas Senate shall consist of members to be chosen every four years by the qualified electors of the several districts. No member of the Arkansas Senate may serve more than two such four year terms.

Sec. 3. Congressional Delegation.

(a) Any person having been elected to three or more terms as a member of the United States House of Representatives from Arkansas shall not be certified as a candidate and shall not be eligible to have his/her name placed on the ballot for election to the United States House of Representatives from Arkansas.

(b) Any person having been elected to two or more terms as a member of the United States Senate from Arkansas shall not be certified as a candidate and shall not be eligible to have his/her name placed on the ballot for election to the United States Senate from Arkansas.

Sec. 4. Severability.

The provisions of this Amendment are severable, and if any should be held invalid, the remainder shall stand.

Sec. 5. Provisions Self-Executing.

Provisions of this Amendment shall be self-executing.

Sec. 6. Application.

(a) This Amendment to the Arkansas Constitution shall take effect and be in operation on January 1, 1993, and its provisions shall be applicable to all person thereafter seeking election to the offices specified in this Amendment.

(b) All laws and constitutional provisions which conflict with this Amendment are hereby repealed to the extent that they conflict with this amendment.

[The Arkansas Supreme Court and the United States Supreme Court held Section 3 to be unconstitutional. See United States Term Limits, Inc. v. Hill, 316 Ark. 251, 872 S.W.2d 349 (1994), affd, __ U.S.__, 115 S.Ct. 1842 (1995)]

California

Constitution of California, Article 4, § 2

(a) The Senate has a membership of 40 Senators elected for4-year terms, 20 to begin every 2 years. No Senator may serve more than 2 terms. The Assembly has a membership of 80 members elected for 2-year terms. No member of the Assembly may serve more than 3 terms. Their terms shall commence on the first Monday in December next following their election.

(b) Election of members of the Assembly shall be on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of even-numbered years unless otherwise prescribed by the Legislature. Senators shall be elected at the same time and places as members of the Assembly.

(c) A person is ineligible to be a member of the Legislature unless the person is an elector and has been a resident of the legislative district for one year, and a citizen of the United States and a resident of California for 3 years, immediately preceding the election.

(d) When a vacancy occurs in the Legislature the Governor immediately shall call an election to fill the vacancy.

Colorado

Constitution of the State of Colorado, Article 5, § 3
Terms of Senators and Representatives.

(1) Senators shall be elected for the term of four years and representatives for the term of two years.

(2) In order to broaden the opportunities for public service and to assure that the general assembly is representative of Colorado citizens, no senator shall serve more than two consecutive terms in the senate, and no representative shall serve more than four consecutive terms in the house of representatives. This limitation on the number of terms shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1991. Any person appointed or elected to fill a vacancy in the general assembly and who serves at least one­half of a term of office shall be considered to have served a term in that office for purposes of this subsection (2). Terms are considered consecutive unless they are at least four years apart.

As amended November 5, 1974 ­ Effective upon proclamation of the Governor, December 20, 1974. (See Laws 1974, p. 448.); as amended by the People November 6, 1990 ­­ Effective upon proclamation of the Governor, January 3, 1991. (For the text of the initiated measure and the votes cast thereon, see L. 91, p. 2035.)

Florida

Constitution of the State of Florida, Article 6, § 4
Disqualifications.

(a) No person convicted of a felony, or adjudicated in this or any other state to be mentally incompetent, shall be qualified to vote or hold office until restoration of civil rights or removal of disability.

(b) No person may appear on the ballot for re-election to any of the following offices:

(1) Florida representative,

(2) Florida senator,

(3) Florida Lieutenant governor,

(4) any office of the Florida cabinet,

(5) U.S. Representative from Florida, or

(6) U.S. Senator from Florida

if, by the end of the current term of office, the person will have served (or, but for resignation, would have served) in that office for eight consecutive years.

History.--Am. by Initiative Petition filed with the Secretary of State July 23, 1992; adopted 1992.

Idaho

Idaho Code, § 34-907
Limitation of Ballot Access for Multi-Term Incumbents

(1) A person shall not be eligible to have his or her name placed upon the primary or general election ballot for a county, state or federal office which they have previously held if they have served, will serve or but for resignation would have served, in that same office by the end of the current term of office for a length of time as follows

a. As a member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing any district within the state, during six (6) or more of the previous eleven (11) years.

b. As a member of the U.S. Senate, during twelve (12) or more of the previous twenty[-]three (23) years.

c. As a state elected official, during eight (8) or more of the previous fifteen (15) years.

d. As a state legislator, representing any district within the state, including all House seats within the same district, during eight (8) or more of the previous fifteen (15) years.

e. As a county commissioner, representing any district within the county, during six (6) or more of the previous eleven (11) years.

f. As any other county elected official, during eight (8) or more of the previous [fifteen] (15) years.

(2) Nothing in this section shall be construed as prohibiting any qualified voter of this state from casting a ballot in a general election for any person by writing the name of that person on any ballot, or as prohibiting such a properly marked general election ballot from being counted or tabulated, nor shall any provision of this section be construed as preventing or prohibiting any person from standing or campaigning for any elective office by means of a "write-in" campaign in a general election.

Louisiana

Louisiana Constitution, Article 3, §4. Qualifications; Residence and Domicile Requirements; Term; Election Limitations; Vacancies

(A) Age; Residence; Domicile. An elector who at the time of qualification as a candidate has attained the age of eighteen years, resided in the state for the preceding two years, and been actually domiciled for the preceding year in the legislative district from which he seeks election is eligible for membership in the legislature.

(B) Domicile; Special Provisions. However, at the next regular election for members of the legislature following legislative reapportionment, an elector may qualify as a candidate from any district created in whole or in part from a district existing prior to reapportionment if he was domiciled in that prior district for at least one year immediately preceding his qualification and was a resident of the state for the two years preceding his qualification. The seat of any member who changes his domicile from the district he represents or, if elected after reapportionment, whose domicile is not within the district he represents at the time he is sworn into office, shall be vacated thereby, any declaration of retention of domicile to the contrary notwithstanding.

(C) Term. A member of the legislature shall be elected for a four-year term.

(D) Vacancy. A vacancy in the legislature shall be filled for the remainder of the term only by election by the electors of the respective district as provided by law.

(E) Election Limitation. No person who has been elected to serve as a member of the Senate for more than two and one-half terms in three consecutive terms, that service being during a term of office that began on or after January 8, 1996, shall be elected to the Senate for the succeeding term. No person who has been elected to serve as a member of the House of Representatives for more than two and one-half terms in hree consecutive terms, that service being during a term of office that began on or after January 8, 1996, shall be elected to the House of Representatives for the succeeding term.

Acts 1995, No. 1326, §1, approved Oct. 21, 1995, eff. Nov. 23, 1995.

Maine

Me. Rev. Stat. Ann., Tit. 21-A, § 553.
Limitations on terms.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, consecutive terms in office are limited as follows. [I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

1. State Senate. A person may not serve more than 4 consecutive terms as a state Senator.

[I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

2. State Representative. A person may not serve more than 4 consecutive terms as a member of the state House of Representatives.

[I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

3. Secretary of State. A person may not serve more than 4 consecutive terms as Secretary of State.

[I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

4. Treasurer of State. A person may not serve more than 4 consecutive terms as Treasurer of State.

[I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

5. Attorney General. A person may not serve more than 4 consecutive terms as Attorney General.

[I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

6. State Auditor. A person may not serve more than 2 consecutive terms as State Auditor.

[I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

This section applies to terms of office that begin on or after December 3, 1996. [I.B. 1993, c. 1, §1 (new); §2 (aff).]

Section History:

1993, IN BILL c. 1, § 1 (NEW).

1993, IN BILL c. 1, § 2 (AFF).

Massachusetts

Mass. Gen. Laws Ann., Chap. 53 § 48
Nomination papers; filing; certificates of nomination; term limitations.

There shall not be printed on the ballot at the state primary or state election the name of any person as a candidate for nomination or election for any office to be filled by all the voters of the commonwealth, or for representative in congress, governor's councillor, senator in the general court or representative in the general court, if said person:

(a) is a candidate for the office of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor or Attorney General who, by the end of the then current term of office will have served, or but for resignation would have served, for two consecutive terms in that office within the eleven year period immediately preceding the end of the then current term of office;

(b) is a candidate for the office of governor's councillor, senator in the general court, representative in the general court, or representative in congress from Massachusetts who, by the end of the then current term of office will have served, or but for resignation would have served, four consecutive terms in that office within the nine year period immediately preceding the end of the then current term of office; or

(c) is a candidate for the office of United States Senator from Massachusetts who, by the end of the then current term of office will have served, or but for resignation would have served, two consecutive terms in that office within the seventeen year period immediately preceding the end of the then current term of office. For the purpose of this section,

(i) any person elected or appointed to the office of governor, lieutenant governor, secretary, treasurer, auditor, attorney general, representative in the general court, senator in the general court, representative in congress or United States Senator from Massachusetts who serves more than one-half of a term in that office, shall be deemed to have served an entire term in that office, and

(ii) any person serving in one of the foregoing offices as of January 15, 1995 shall be deemed to be serving his first term in that office.

Note: Massachusetts's term limits law was invalidated in 1997 by the Massachusetts Supreme Court.

Michigan

Constitution of the State of Michigan of 1963, Article 4, § 54
Limitations on terms of office of state legislators.

No person shall be elected to the office of state representative more than three times. No person shall be elected to the office of state senate more than two times. Any person appointed or elected to fill a vacancy in the house of representatives or the state senate for a period greater than one half of a term of such office, shall be considered to have been elected to serve one time in that office for purposes of this section. This limitation on the number of times a person shall be elected to office shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1993.

This section shall be self-executing. Legislation may be enacted to facilitate operation of this section, but no law shall limit or restrict the application of this section. If any part of this section is held to be invalid or unconstitutional, the remaining parts of this section shall not be affected but will remain in full force and effect.

History: Add. Init. approved Nov. 3, 1992, Eff. Dec. 19, 1992 .

Missouri

Missouri Constitution, Article 3, § 8
Term limitations for members of General Assembly.

No one shall be elected or appointed to serve more than eight years total in any one house of the General Assembly nor more than sixteen years total in both houses of the General Assembly. In applying this section, service in the General Assembly resulting from an election or appointment prior to the effective date of this section shall not be counted.

(Adopted November 3, 1992)

Montana

Constitution of the State of Montana, Article 4, § 8.
Limitation on terms of office.

(1) The secretary of state or other authorized official shall not certify a candidate's nomination or election to, or print or cause to be printed on any ballot the name of a candidate for, one of the following offices if, at the end of the current term of that office, the candidate will have served in that office or had he not resigned or been recalled would have served in that office:
(a) 8 or more years in any 16-year period as governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state auditor, attorney general, or superintendent of public instruction;
(b) 8 or more years in any 16-year period as a state representative;
(c) 8 or more years in any 16-year period as a state senator;
(d) 6 or more years in any 12-year period as a member of the U.S. house of representatives; and
(e) 12 or more years in any 24-year period as a member of the U.S. senate.
(2) When computing time served for purposes of subsection (1), the provisions of subsection (1) do not apply to time served in terms that end during or prior to January 1993.
(3) Nothing contained herein shall preclude an otherwise qualified candidate from being certified as nominated or elected by virtue of write-in votes cast for said candidate.

History: En. Sec. 1, Const. Initiative No. 64, approved Nov. 3, 1992.

Nebraska

Nebraska Constitution, Article 3, § 8.
Limitation on terms of office.

(1) The secretary of state or other authorized official shall not certify a candidate's nomination or election to, or print or cause to be printed on any ballot the name of a candidate for, one of the following offices if, at the end of the current term of that office, the candidate will have served in that office or had he not resigned or been recalled would have served in that office:
(a) 8 or more years in any 16-year period as governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state auditor, attorney general, or superintendent of public instruction;
(b) 8 or more years in any 16-year period as a state representative;
(c) 8 or more years in any 16-year period as a state senator;
(d) 6 or more years in any 12-year period as a member of the U.S. house of representatives; and
(e) 12 or more years in any 24-year period as a member of the U.S. senate.
(2) When computing time served for purposes of subsection (1), the provisions of subsection (1) do not apply to time served in terms that end during or prior to January 1993.
(3) Nothing contained herein shall preclude an otherwise qualified candidate from being certified as nominated or elected by virtue of write-in votes cast for said candidate.

History: En. Sec. 1, Const. Initiative No. 64, approved Nov. 3, 1992.

Note: Nebraska's term limits law was invalidated by the Nebraska Supreme Court in 1996.

Nevada

Nevada Constitution, Article 4, Section 3
Members of assembly: Election and term of office; eligibility for office.

1. The members of the Assembly shall be chosen biennially by the qualified electors of their respective districts, on the Tuesday next after the first Monday in November and their term of office shall be two years from the day next after their election.

2. No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has served in that office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district of this state.

[Amended in 1996. Proposed by initiative petition and approved and ratified by the people at the 1994 and 1996 general elections.]

Nevada Constitution, Article 4, § 4

Senators: Election and term of office; eligibility for office.

1. Senators shall be chosen at the same time and places as members of the Assembly by the qualified electors of their respective districts, and their term of Office shall be four Years from the day next after their election.

2. No person may be elected or appointed as a Senator who has served in that office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district of this state.

[Amended in 1996. Proposed by initiative petition and approved and ratified by the people at the 1994 and 1996 general elections.]

Nevada Constitution, Article 5, § 19
Other state officers: Election and term of office; eligibility for office.

1. A secretary of state, a treasurer, a controller, and an attorney general, shall be elected at the same time and places, and in the same manner as the governor. The term of office of each shall be the same as is prescribed for the governor.

2. Any elector shall be eligible to any of these offices, but no person may be elected to any of them more than twice, or more than once if he has previously held the office by election or appointment.

[Amended in 1954 and 1996. The first amendment was proposed and passed by the 1951 legislature; agreed to and passed by the 1953 legislature; and approved and ratified by the people at the 1954 general election. See: Statutes of Nevada 1951, p. 581; Statutes of Nevada 1953, p. 715. The second amendment was proposed by initiative petition and approved and ratified by the people at the 1994 and 1996 general elections.]

Nevada Constitution, Article 15, § 3
Eligibility for public office.

1. No person shall be eligible to any office who is not a qualified elector under this constitution.

2. No person may be elected to any state office or local governing body who has served in that office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, unless the permissible number of terms or duration of service is otherwise specified in this constitution.

[Amended in 1889, 1912, 1978 and 1996. The first amendment was proposed and passed by the 1887 legislature; agreed to and passed by the 1889 legislature; and approved and ratified by the people at a special election held February 11, 1889. See: Statutes of Nevada 1887, p. 162; Statutes of Nevada 1889, p. 151. The second amendment was proposed and passed by the 1909 legislature; agreed to and passed by the 1911 legislature; and approved and ratified by the people at the 1912 general election. See: Statutes of Nevada 1909, p. 349; Statutes of Nevada 1911, p. 454. The third amendment was proposed and passed by the 1975 legislature; agreed to and passed by the 1977 legislature; and approved and ratified by the people at the 1978 general election. See: Statutes of Nevada 1975, p. 1902; Statutes of Nevada 1977, p. 1687. The fourth amendment was proposed by initiative petition and approved and ratified by the people at the 1994 and 1996 general elections.]

REVISER'S NOTE.

The ballot question pursuant to which subsection 2 of this section was approved and ratified by the people at the 1994 and 1996 general elections was written in two parts. Pursuant to the first part of that question, the people approved the amendment of the Nevada constitution to establish term limits for state and local public officers in the executive and legislative branches of government. Pursuant to the second part of that ballot question, the people disapproved the amendment of the Nevada constitution to establish term limits for Nevada justices and judges.

Ohio

Ohio Constitution, Article 2, § 2
Election and term of legislators.

Representatives shall be elected biennially by the electors of the respective house of representatives districts; their term of office shall commence on the first day of January next thereafter and continue two years.

Senators shall be elected by the electors of the respective senate districts; their terms of office shall commence on the first day of January next after their election. All terms of senators which commence on the first day of January, 1969 shall be four years, and all terms which commence on the first day of January, 1971 shall be four years. Thereafter, except for the filling of vacancies for unexpired terms, senators shall be elected to and hold office for terms of four years.

No person shall hold the office of State Senator for a period of longer than two successive terms of four years. No person shall hold the office of State Representative for a period longer than four successive terms of two years. Terms shall be considered successive unless separated by a period of four or more years. Only terms beginning on or after January 1, 1993 shall be considered in determining an individual's eligibility to hold office.

(Adopted November 3, 1992.)
(As enacted Nov. 7, 1967. Former § 2 repealed, see SJR 24, 107th General Assembly.)

Oklahoma

Constitution of the State of Oklahoma, § V-17A
Limitation of time served in the Legislature.

Any member of the Legislature who is elected to office after the effective date of this amendment shall be eligible to serve no more than 12 years in the Oklahoma State Legislature. Years in Legislative office need not be consecutive and years of service in both the Senate and the House of Representatives shall be added together and included in determining the total number of Legislative years in office. The years served by any member elected or appointed to serve less than a full Legislative term to fill a vacancy in office shall not be included in the 12-year limitation set forth herein; but no member who has completed 12 years in office shall thereafter be eligible to serve a partial term. Any member who is serving a Legislative term in office or who has been elected or appointed to serve a term in office on the effective date hereof shall be entitled to complete his or her term and shall be eligible to serve an additional 12 years thereafter. This amendment shall be effective on the 1st day of the year following its adoption.

Oregon

Constitution of Oregon, Article 2, § 19.
Limits on Oregon Terms.

To promote varied representation, to broaden the opportunities for public service, and to make the electoral process fairer by reducing the power of incumbency, terms in Oregon elected offices are limited as follows:

(1) No person shall serve more than six years in the Oregon House of Representatives, eight years in the Oregon Senate, and twelve years in the Oregon Legislative Assembly in his or her lifetime.

(2) No person shall serve more than eight years in each Oregon statewide office in his or her lifetime.

(3) Only terms of service beginning after this Act [sections 19 to 21 of this Article] goes into effect [December 3, 1992] shall count towards the limits of this Section.

(4) When a person is appointed or elected to fill a vacancy in office, then such service shall be counted as one term for the purposes of this Section.

(5) A person shall not appear on the ballot as a candidate for elected office or be appointed to fill a vacancy in office if serving a full term in such office would cause them to violate the limits in this Section.

(6) This Section does not apply to judicial offices. [Created through initiative petition filed April 23, 1991, and adopted by the people Nov. 3, 1992]

Note: The leadline to section 19 was a part of the measure proposed by initiative petition filed April 23, 1991, and adopted by the people Nov. 3, 1992.

South Dakota

Constitution of South Dakota, Article 3, § 6.
Legislative terms of office -- Compensation -- Regular sessions.

The terms of office of the members of the Legislature shall be two years; they shall receive for their services the salary fixed by law under the provisions of § 2 of article XXI of this Constitution, and five cents for every mile of necessary travel in going to and returning from the place of meeting of the Legislature on the most usual route.

No person may serve more than four consecutive terms or a total of eight consecutive years in the senate and more than four consecutive terms or a total of eight consecutive years in the house of representatives. However, this restriction does not apply to partial terms to which a legislator may be appointed or to legislative service before January 1, 1993.

A regular session of the Legislature shall be held in each odd-numbered year and shall not exceed forty legislative days, excluding Sundays, holidays, and legislative recess, except in cases of impeachment, and members of the Legislature shall receive no other pay or perquisites except salary and mileage.

A regular session of the Legislature shall be held in each even-numbered year beginning with the year 1964 and shall not exceed thirty-five legislative days, excluding Sundays, holidays, and legislative recess, except in cases of impeachment, and members of the Legislature shall receive no other pay or perquisites except salary and mileage.

Utah

Utah Code Ann., § 20A-10-201.
Term limits -- State officers.

(1) (a) A state executive officer may not seek reelection or be elected to an office if, by the end of the state officer's current term, the state officer will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(b) The lieutenant governor may not certify the name of any state officer for placement on the ballot if, by the end of the state officer's current term, the state officer will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(c) A county clerk may not allow the name of any state officer to be printed on a ballot if, by the end of the state officer's current term, the state officer will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(d) The state board of canvassers may not declare any state officer "elected" if, by the end of the state officer's current term, the state officer will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(2) (a) A state representative may not seek reelection or be elected to an office if, by the end of the state representative's current term, the state representative will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(b) The lieutenant governor may not certify the name of any state representative for placement on the ballot if, by the end of the state representative's current term, the state representative will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(c) A county clerk may not allow the name of any state representative to be printed on a ballot if, by the end of the state representative's current term, the state representative will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(d) The state board of canvassers may not declare any state representative "elected" if, by the end of the state representative's current term, the state representative will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(3) (a) A state senator may not seek reelection or be elected to an office if, by the end of the state senator's current term, the state senator will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(b) The lieutenant governor may not certify the name of any state senator for placement on the ballot if, by the end of the state senator's current term, the state senator will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(c) A county clerk may not allow the name of any state senator to be printed on a ballot if, by the end of the state senator's current term, the state senator will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(d) The state board of canvassers may not declare any state senator "elected" if, by the end of the state senator's current term, the state senator will have served, or but for resignation would have served, 12 or more consecutive years.
(4) For purposes of calculating the term limits established by this section, no person may count the time a state officer, state representative, or state senator served in a particular office before January 1, 1995.

Enacted by Chapter 264, 1994 General Session

Washington

Wash. Rev. Code § 44.04.015
Term limits.

(1) No person is eligible to appear on the ballot or file a declaration of candidacy for the house of representatives of the legislature who, by the end of the then current term of office will have served, or but for resignation would have served, as a member of the house of representatives of the legislature during six of the previous twelve years.

(2) No person is eligible to appear on the ballot or file a declaration of candidacy for the senate of the legislature who, by the end of the then current term of office will have served, or but for resignation would have served, as a member of the senate of the legislature during eight of the previous fourteen years.

(3) No person is eligible to appear on the ballot or file a declaration of candidacy for the legislature who has served as a member of the legislature for fourteen of the previous twenty years.

[1993 c 1 § 3 (Initiative Measure No. 573, approved November 3, 1992).]

NOTES:
Preamble -- Severability -- 1993 c 1 (Initiative Measure No. 573): See notes following RCW 43.01.015.

Washington's term limits law was declared unconstitutional in 1998 by the Washington Supreme Court.

Wyoming

Wyo. Stat. § 22-5-103.
Legislative service; limits on ballot access; state offices.

(a) Notwithstanding any other provision of Wyoming law, the secretary of state or other authorized official shall not certify the name of any person as the nominee or candidate for the office sought, nor shall that person be elected nor serve in that office if the following will occur:

(i) The person, by the end of the current term of office will have served, or but for resignation, would have served eight (8) or more years in any sixteen (16) year period in the office for which the candidate is seeking nomination or election, except, that any time served in that particular office prior to January 1, 1993, shall not be counted for purposes of this term limit. This provision shall apply to the offices of governor, secretary of state, state auditor, state treasurer, and state superintendent of public instruction;

(ii) The person, by the end of the current term of office will have served, or but for resignation, would have served twelve (12) or more years in any twenty-four (24) year period as a state representative, except that any time served in the office of state representative prior to January 1, 1993, shall not count for purposes of this term limit;

  • (iii) The person, by the end of the current term of office will have served, or but for resignation, would have served twelve (12) or more years in any twenty-four (24) year period as a state senator, except that any time served as a state senator prior to January 1, 1993, shall not be counted for purposes of this term limit. 22-5-104. Term limitation; limits on ballot access; federal offices