Senate Majority Leader from Iowa Elected NCSL Vice President

8/27/2014

NCSL NewsSenator Mike Gronstal Will Become NCSL President in 2016

Denver—Iowa Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal (D) was elected vice president of the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), a bipartisan organization that serves the nation’s 7,382 state lawmakers and legislative staff. He took office at NCSL's Legislative Summit in Minneapolis, Minn., on Aug. 22, 2014.

The state senator will serve one year as vice president, ascend to president-elect the following year, and then become president at the Legislative Summit in 2016. NCSL leadership alternates between parties every year.

“I have been involved in NCSL for many years and I look forward to working with a group that represents the interests of all states and takes such a constructive approach to problem solving,” said Gronstal. “I believe new leaders do not necessarily come with all the skills they need to be an effective leader and NCSL provides great opportunities for both new and old to learn skills and be more effective.”

A Democrat, Gronstal has served Iowa’s 8th Senate District since 1985 and currently serves as Senate majority leader and chairs the Rules and Administration Committee.

During his years of service, Gronstal has focused on better jobs, education and health care for all Iowans. His legislative agenda in the Senate includes addressing Iowa’s shortage of skilled workers through funding greater opportunities for job training in Iowa’s community colleges, school districts and adult education programs.

Gronstal is a third generation Council Bluffs resident, where he lives with his wife, Connie. They have two grown daughters, Kate and Sara.


NCSL is a bipartisan organization that serves the legislators and staffs of the states, commonwealths and territories. It provides research, technical assistance and opportunities for policymakers to exchange ideas on the most pressing state issues and is an effective and respected advocate for the interests of the states in the American federal system.