Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund Tracker

11/30/2021

3rd grade student

In 2020 and 2021, Congress passed three stimulus bills that provided nearly $190.5 billion to the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) Fund. States receive funds based on the same proportion that each state receives under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title-IA. States must distribute at least 90% of funds to local education agencies (LEAs) based on their proportional share of ESEA Title I-A funds. States have the option to reserve 10% of the allocation for emergency needs as determined by the state to address issues responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, passed on March 27, 2020, provided $13.5 billion to the ESSER Fund.
  • The Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2021 (CRRSA), passed on Dec. 27, 2020, provided $54.3 billion in supplemental ESSER funding, known as the ESSER II fund. 
  • The American Rescue Plan Act, passed on March 11, 2021, provided $122.7 billion in supplemental ESSER funding, known as the ESSER III fund.
    • The SEAs are required to reserve their allocations to carry out activities: 5% to address learning loss, 1% for afterschool activities, and 1% for summer learning programs.
    • The LEAs must reserve at least 20% of the funding they receive to address learning loss. 
    • Two-thirds of ESSER funds are immediately available to states, while remaining funds will be made available after states submit ESSER implementation plans. The U.S. Department of Education is reviewing and approving submitted state plans. As of November 11, 2021, 46 states have had their plan approved. 

(*N/A: Data not available)

 

Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund
State
Total ESSER Allocation
  Minimum LEA Allocation SEA Documents SEA Set-Aside Amount  SEA Plan For 10% Set-Aside

Alabama

 

$216,947,540 (ESSER I)

 

$899,464,932

(ESSER II)

 

$2,020,070,466

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$195,252,786 (ESSER I)

 

 

$809,518,439 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,818,063,419 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Alabama State Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Alabama ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$21,694,754 

(ESSER I)

 

$89,946,493

(ESSER II)

 

$202,007,047

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) proposes to use its SEA reserve to support:

  • Technological capacity and access to support remote learning. The strategies ALSDE intends to use to serve disadvantaged populations.
  • Remote learning by developing new informational and academic resources and expanding awareness of, and access to, best practices and innovations in remote learning and support for students, families, and educators.”

ESSER II: The state is using a portion of the state set aside to provide LEAs with additional funding for the following purposes:

  • Formative student assessment in Grades 4-8 for mathematics and reading at a rate of $12 per student.
  • Course of study professional development in Mathematics and English Language Arts.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Increasing student reading Comprehension through establing Summer Reading Camps (SRC) for Students in grades K-3. SRCs will also provide Early Science of Reading training for educators. LEAs will be provided the resource guide, "Road to Recovery".

More information here.

Alaska

 

$38,407,914

(ESSER I)

 

$159,719,422 

(ESSER II)

 

$358,707,134

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$34,567,123 (ESSER I)

 

 

$143,747,480 (ESSER II)

 

 

$322,836,421 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Alaska Department of Education & Early Development guidance to LEAs

 

Alaska ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$3,840,791 

(ESSER I)

 

$15,971,942

(ESSER II)

 

$35,870,713

(ESSER III)

The Alaska Department of Education & Early Development has used $2,810,414 of their state set-aside for the following:

  • Cook Inlet Tribal Council Digital Badging Project: $50,000
  • Mt. Edgecumbe IT Fiber and Hardware: $200,000
  • Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Map Growth Data Consulting: $48,000
  • Teachers' Certification Digital/Paperless System: $750,000
  • Canvas Contract (2 years): $1,547,625
  • Alaska Statewide Virtual System Additional Seats (Summer School): $150,000
  • School Districts (Pelican, Skagway, Aleutian Region): $14,789
  • Alaska Association of School Business Officials (ALASBO) Grant: $50,000

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The Alaska Department of Education and Early Development will use the Region 16 Comprehensive Center to focus on evidence-based strategies to support reading and career and technincal education.
  • They created a single application process which will allow potential subgrantees to apply for both summer learning and afterschool funding in a singular application.

Arizona

 

$277,422,944

(ESSER I)

 

$1,149,715,947

(ESSER II)

 

$2,582,098,697

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$249,680,650 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,034,744,352 (ESSER II)

 

 

$2,323,888,827 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Arizona Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Arizona ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$27,742,294

(ESSER I)

 

$114,971,595

(ESSER II)

 

$258,209,870

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: "The Arizona Department of Education intends to use its state set-aside to support students, families, educators, and leaders to enhance K-12 COVID-19 relief, prevention and preparation, and recovery efforts statewide. Emphasis will be placed on areas most significantly impacted by COVID-19 – including Tribal Communities, rural and remote schools. These additional funds will also help to ensure that all eligible LEAs receive a minimum ESSER Fund allocation of at least $50,000. The following is the methodology used to provide these additional funds:

  • Determine a per-pupil amount (PPA) based on 50% of the state FY20 Total Final Adjusted Poverty for the eligible Title I Cohort (Total for LEA Assistance / Total Adjusted Poverty)
  • Ensure all LEA allocations meet the 50% PPA as applied to their final adjusted poverty count
  • Ensure a minimum allocation of $50,000 (~26% of LEAs)"

ESSER II: The state is using 45% ($48 million) of the ESSER II set aside to ensure that all LEAs, regardless of whether or not they received Title I-A funds in FY 2021, will receive an allocation based on a minimum per pupil amount based on poverty data. This will guarantee $150,000 in relief funding for every public school district and non-profit charter school in Arizona, with $175,000 guaranteed for rural school districts and charter schools, and $200,000 guaranteed for the most remote school districts and charter schools.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • They also have leveraged $47,500,838.92 of ARP ESSER funds to provide additional LEA assistance for Title I-A LEAs, Non-Title I-A LEAs, and Career Technical Education Districts (CTEDs).

 

More information here.

Arkansas

 

$128,758,638

(ESSER I)

 

$558,017,409

(ESSER II)

 

$1,253,227,833

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$115,882,774 (ESSER I)

 

 

$502,215,668 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,127,905,050 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Arkansas Division of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) guidance to LEAs

 

Arkansas ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$12,875,864

(ESSER I)

 

$55,801,741

(ESSER II)

 

$125,322,783

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: "The Arkansas Division of Elementary and Secondary Education will be setting aside the SEA reserve for future needs within the parameters of the CARES Act. Arkansas reserves the option to use a portion of its SEA reserve to support remote learning."

 

ESSER II: The state using the ESSER II set-aside for the following:

  • $4.6 million of the $55.8 million is being used to cover unmet COVID-19 emergency leave claims from school employees in the first semester of this year. The purpose of the COVID-leave funding was to encourage sick employees to stay home and not spread the virus without using their traditional sick leave or losing pay if they did not have any sick days to use.
  • $23.2 million will be allocated to districts that received less than $600 per student in ESSER II funds, which was awarded a portion of the overall state set-aside funds to bring the district up to a base amount.
  • The rest of the set-aside is going to be used to address unmet student needs and learning gaps. There are plans to use about $12 million from the state's share of the Federal Emergency Relief Act funds and $5 million from the GEER program funds to build a statewide strategy for mental health and behavior support. Up to $7.5 million is being earmarked for "teaching academies" to increase the numbers of special education and computer science teachers, and to enhance teacher skills in online education. As much as $5 million is being reserved for addressing the needs of students who are at risk of not graduating because they stopped attending or rarely participated in online or on-site classes during the pandemic. $1 million will be allocated to upgrade the heating and cooling systems at the state's Little Rock schools for deaf and blind students.

More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to provide LEAs with access to an early warning system to identify at-risk students in need of interventions. 
  • Accelerating learning to address learning loss will be fostered through Arkansas’ Initiative for Instructional Materials (AIIM). 
  • Addressing learning loss for at-risk students will include the creation of a system by the Arkansas Tutoring Corps to recruit, prepare, and support potential tutor candidates.
  • The Arkansas Out-of-School Network will fund and give funding preference to programs that serve students living in poverty and those that are homeless. 

California

 

$1,647,306,127

(ESSER I)

 

$6,709,633,866

(ESSER II)

 

$15,068,884,546

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$1,482,575,514 (ESSER I)

 

 

$6,038,670,479 (ESSER II)

 

 

$13,561,996,091 (ESSER III)

 

 

The California Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

California ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$164,730,613

(ESSER I)

 

$670,963,387

(ESSER II)

 

$1,506,888,455

(ESSER III)

 

 

The California Department of Education has directed most of its funding from the state reserve to LEAs through $112.2 million to support nutrition services and $45 million for a competitive grant program to support and expand existing community schools.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • California is using the five percent reserve to address the academic impact of lost instructional time as part of the funding for Expanded Learning Opportunity (ELO) grants.
  • California will use the 2.5% of reserve funds to support the ELO Program.

Colorado

 

$120,993,782

(ESSER I)

 

$519,324,311

(ESSER II)

 

$1,166,328,632

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$108,894,404 (ESSER I)

 

 

$467,391,880 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,049,695,769 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Colorado Department of Education guidance to LEAS

 

Colorado ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$12,099,378

(ESSER I)

 

$51,932,431

(ESSER II)

 

$116,632,863

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Colorado Department of Education has determined that $4.6 million of the state reserve will be directed to school districts,  BOCES and Tribes that received little or no relief funding in LEA distribution. 

The $4.6 million will be distributed in the following ways:

  • $750,000 to help BOCES with gaps in their special education funding and to provide operational support for BOCES with brick-and-mortar schools.
  • $70,000 to support educational needs of the Colorado Tribes.
  • $320,000 for 11 districts to support educational needs of the Native American students. 
  • $1.5 million for districts that did not receive or received a very small allocation from the 90% allocation. 
  • $2 million for districts, BOCES and Tribes for connectivity to broadband. 

The use of the remaining state set aside funds will be determined by the commissioner later in the fall of 2020.

 

ESSER II: The state is using the ESSER II set-aside fund for school districts, BOCES and tribes that received little or no relief funding in the earlier distribution of 90% of ESSER II funding based in Title I allocations.

The $16.8 million distribution will provide support for Native American students and students with special needs, among others, and will be distributed in the following ways:

  • $7,697,837 to help districts and BOCES support students with special needs.
  • $7,010,343 for districts that did not receive or received a very small allocation from the 90% allocation of ESSER II funds for Title I schools, as well as support for Native American students
  • $1,767,000 for operation support for BOCES and additional funding for BOCES with brick-and-mortar schools.
  • $280,000 to support educational needs of the Colorado tribes.

The Colorado Department of Education will reserve the remaining ESSER II state reserve funding to support educator recruitment and retention efforts and extended learning opportunities for students who have experienced the greatest impact on learning during the pandemic. The use of the remaining state set aside funds will be determined by the commissioner.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • CDE will prioritize funding for:
    • Empowering Action for School Improvement (EASI) Grants.
    • Supplemental Funding for Districts, BOCES, Special Education, Tribal Nations, and other High-Risk Populations.
  • Summer Learning and Enrichment and Afterschool Funding wiill prioritize:
    • Supporting academic acceleration for students most impacted by the pandemic with a focus on math and literacy for students in grades K-8.
    • Expanding learning opportunities to strengthen student engagement in learning in both the traditional school day and beyond.

More information here.

Connecticut

 

$111,068,059

(ESSER I)

 

$492,426,458

(ESSER II)

 

$1,105,919,874

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$99,961,253 (ESSER I)

 

 

$443,183,812 (ESSER II)

 

 

$995,327,887 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Connecticut State Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Connecticut ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$11,106,806

(ESSER I)

 

$49,242,646

(ESSER II)

 

$110,591,987

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Connecticut State Department of Education intends to use its state set-aside to address the following:

  • Equitable Access to Technology
  • Equitable Access to High Quality Online Curriculum including necessary supports 
  • Education Recovery & Reopening Schools
  • Social and Emotional Well-being

ESSER II: The state is using a portion of the ESSER II set aside amount to provide funding to LEAs who did not receive any funding through the formula grant, to LEAs that have received a decrease in the formula grant allocation, and for endowed academies, Goodwin University and EdAdvance. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Statewide Model Curricula (Addressing Learning Loss): This allows CSDE to make notable impact in the state’s education system while seeking to minimize the funding gap.
  • Extension of Contracts to Deliver Statewide Online Curricula and Courses to Districts (Addressing Learning Loss): The Department entered into two partnerships with Apex Learning and Defined Learning to support its goal of delivering equitable access to high-quality online curricula and courses at no cost to school districts.
  • Expansion Grant Program (Summer Enrichment): Expansion Grants ranging from $2,500 to $25,000 were awarded to 210 eligible applicants that will expand existing enrichment opportunities and increase access for children who might otherwise not have access to summer camp or programming.
  • Innovation Grant Program (Summer Enrichment): Innovation Grants ranging from $50,000 to $250,000 were awarded to 25 eligible applicants to deliver bold and innovative summer enrichment programming to Connecticut children at scale this summer.
  • Funding for Districts and Endowed Academies not Eligible for Formula ARP ESSER Funding

More information here.

Delaware

 

$43,492,753

(ESSER I)

 

$182,885,104

(ESSER II)

 

$410,733,965

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$39,143,478 (ESSER I)

 

 

$164,596,594 (ESSER II)

 

 

$369,660,568 (ESSER III)

The Delaware Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Deleware ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,349,275

(ESSER I)

 

$18,288,510

(ESSER II)

 

$41,073,397

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: "The Delaware Department of Education intends to use $3.1 million of its set-aside ($4,349,275) to support technological capacity and access. Of the $3.1 million for technology, $1.5 million will go to support low-income students. Furthermore, Delaware’s guidance to LEAs will emphasize the following four of the twelve allowable use categories:

  • Disadvantaged populations
  • Addressing long-term closures including meals, technology, IDEA
  • Educational technology
  • Summer learning and supplemental afterschool programs"

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set aside amount for the following:

  • Resources to address unfinished learning for students in every district and charter school through acceleration in literacy (rising 1-6 graders), math (rising 1-8 graders) and evidence-based high-dosage tutoring for the most struggling students.
  • Access to online texts for K-12 students in every district and charter school.
  • Access to credentialed programs and apprenticeships in an online format for every user in Delaware.
  • Communication with families of English language learner students in every district and charter school.
  • Educator support and pipeline development.
  • Socioemotional/behavioral health services.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • LEAs will strengthen the implementation of Tier 1 Core Instruction through Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS).
  • Summer Learning Acceleration plans will be supplied for all students. High Dosage tutoring outlined in the Summer Acceleration plan will be expanded into the 2021-2022 school year and beyond.
  • Students and Educators in grades K-12 will be provided with 24/7 access to an online reading platform and digital book collection called Sora. Additionally, students will be able to borrow books from the Delaware Public Library System through Sora.

More information here.

D.C.

 

$42,006,354

(ESSER I)

 

$172,013,174

(ESSER II)

 

$386,317,154

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$37,805,719 (ESSER I)

 

 

$154,811,857 (ESSER II)

 

 

$347,685,439 (ESSER III)

 

 

The District of Columbia Office of the State Superintendent of Education guidance to LEAs

 

District of Columbia ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,200,635

(ESSER I)

 

$17,201,317

(ESSER II)

 

$38,631,715 (ESSER III)

ESSER I: "OSSE plans to use their set-aside funds for contractual needs to be determined in the 2020-21 school year to support recovery learning in accordance with OSSE’s principles for continuous education."

 

ESSER II: The DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education is using a portion of their ESSER II set-aside to provide funding to LEAs not eligible for the ESSER II fund.  More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to scale up the use of high-quality literacy and math curriculum, award grants to develop high quality course materials for non-math and non-ELA courses.
  • Increasing support for students with disabilities and English Learners (ELs).
  • The Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) will expand its Out of School Time (OST) Grants for Summer Learning and Enrichment and Afterschool Programming.
    • OST is currently administered through a partnership between the DC Housing Authority and DC Department of Human Services for students residing in public housing and short-term family housing.
    • Additionally, these OST Grants will be used to create summer programming for students in the juvenile justice system, underserved communities, and those identified as at-risk.

Florida

 

$770,247,851

(ESSER I)

 

$3,133,878,723

(ESSER II)

 

$7,038,246,438

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$693,223,066 (ESSER I)

 

 

$2,820,490,851 (ESSER II)

 

 

$6,334,421,794 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Florida Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

 

$77,024,785

(ESSER I)

 

$313,387,872

(ESSER II)

 

$703,824,644

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Florida Department of Education (FDOE) intends to use its portion of the ESSER Fund reward to focus on three top priorities for the state, which include on closing achievement gaps, a proactive plan that will reinforce literacy supports, especially for Florida’s low-income and academically struggling K-5 students, and a comprehensive model that supports the safety and health of all students and staff. Each LEA will be asked to implement their own Instructional Continuity Plan (ICP) An ICP is an LEA/School plan for implementing distance learning.”

 

ESSER II: $106 million from the ESSER II set-aside fund will go towards the Civic Literacy Excellence Initiative. This includes professional development support and a $3,000 bonus for teachers participating in the Florida Civics Seal of Excellence endorsement program. More information here.

Georgia

 

$457,169,852

(ESSER I)

 

$1,892,092,618

(ESSER II)

 

$4,249,371,244

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$411,452,867 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,702,883,356 (ESSER II)

 

 

$3,824,434,120 (ESSER III)

The Georgia Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Georgia ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$45,716,985

(ESSER I)

 

$189,209,262

(ESSER II)

 

$424,937,124

(ESSER III)

ESSER I:The Georgia Department of Education is withholding 10% for a rainy day fund should districts need help in the future for COVID-19 costs and is keeping half a percent — or nearly $2.3 million — to administer the grant.

 

ESSER II: The state will provide $1,000 bonus payment to every K-12 public-school teacher and other education support personnel. The payments will be provided through two sources: approximately $60 million from the governor's office and approximately $180 million from the ESSER II funds.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Georgia will focus their efforts on three priorities; include accelerating learning, personalizing student support, and promoting opportunities.
    • Efforts will include adding school level nurses as well as mental health professionals. 
    • In order to expand opportunity, grants will be awarded to preserve current Career and Technical Student Educations Organizations (CTSOs). 
    • Providing “Opportunity Grants to expand extracurriculars. 
  • Creating the Office of Rural Education (ORE), fund a state-level library media specialist, and expand broadband access. ORE will create a cabinet level-position to advocate for rural Georgians, establish partnerships to best leverage resources, and identify funding opportunities within the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) to support rural areas.
  • The 2.5% reserve Funds will be used to support the Career, Technical,and Agricultural Programs. 

More information here.

Hawaii

 

$43,385,229

(ESSER I)

 

$183,595,211

(ESSER II)

 

$412,328,764

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$39,046,706 (ESSER I)

 

 

$165,235,690 (ESSER II)

 

 

$371,095,888 (ESSER III)

The Hawaii Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Hawaii ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,338,523

(ESSER I)

 

$18,359,521

(ESSER II)

 

$41,232,876

(ESSER III)

The Hawaii Department of Education will use its SEA set-aside fund to support distance learning programs to public and public charter schools. The allocations include:

  • $6.01 million for summer learning.
  • $15.01 million for devices & connectivity.
  • $6.34 million for special education.
  • $2.43 million for training & support.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • HIDOE has finalized a learning acceleration framework to target students who are behind grade level in math or language arts skills. IEP/Section 504 teams will meet to decide Covid specific interventions for students with IEPS and 504s. Programs will be implemented to work with students making the transition to the next level.
  • HIDOE will conduct track the incoming 6th grade class beginning with 2021-2022 School Year to determine if the ESSER funds are making the desired impact. 

More information here.

Idaho

 

$47,854,695

(ESSER I)

 

$195,890,413

(ESSER II)

 

$439,942,041

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$43,069,226 (ESSER I)

 

 

$176,301,372 (ESSER II)

 

 

$395,947,837 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Idaho State Board of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Idaho ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,785,470

(ESSER I)

 

$19,589,041

(ESSER II)

 

$43,994,204

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Idaho State Board of Education will use its state reservation for a learning management system and may be used to cover the costs of a current learning management system already in place, a one-time set-up fee for a new learning management system, professional development related to implementing an LMS. Grant Funding Methodology ESSER Fund Set aside

 

ESSER II: The legislature’s Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee set some requirements on how that $19 million can be spent, including that $6.1 million must be given to charter schools that have seen large increases to their student populations. $11.9 million will be used for the SEA to allocate at its discretion. The state will use $9.5 million of the ESSER II set-aside fund to offset a 5% reduction to state education budgets passed last year.

  • $2.1 million to school districts that received no ESSER II funds
  • $7.4 million to those that received a relatively low payment from the program.
  • The remaining $2.3 million that could be divided among those same schools that received little or no ESSER II funding to help offset other COVID-19-related expenditures.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • After-school and Summer learning professionals will also be provided with professional development to better serve students. 
  • They will set aside these funds for LEAs who receive no or low formula-based ARP ESSER LEA allocations based on Title 1.
  • Funds will be provided to the Idaho Bureau of Education Service for the Deaf and Blind since they have not qualified for allocation but found students in need of services. 

More information here.

Ilinois

 

$569,467,218

(ESSER I)

 

$2,250,804,891

(ESSER II)

 

$5,054,988,054

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$512,520,496 (ESSER I)

 

 

$2,025,724,402 (ESSER II)

 

 

$4,549,489,249 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) guidance to LEAs

 

Illinois ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$56,946,722

(ESSER I)

 

$225,080,489

(ESSER II)

 

$505,498,805

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has allocated $512 million from the ESSER Fund directly to Illinois school districts to support their local response to the COVID-19 pandemic and prepare for the unique challenges of the upcoming school year.  School districts receive reimbursement on a rolling basis upon their submission of expenditure reports. ISBE will direct the remaining ESSER funds in the following seven categories: $33.3 million for laptops and tablets; $7.1 million for internet connectivity; $6.5 million for virtual coaching in support of an estimated 4,000 new teachers who will be entering the teaching profession this fall; $6.5 million for professional development; $2.8 million for state administration; and $685,000 for entities that are not eligible for the direct funds due to ineligibility for the federal Title I program.

 

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside for districts not eligible for Title I, receiving about $63 per student.  Nonpublic schools are not included in this funding.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to provide equity-based allocations to all LEAs, including non-title 1 LEAs, Regional Offices of Education (ROE), and Special Education Cooperatives. This will account for $214,285,175 of the States ESSER 3 allocations. 
  • $500,000 will be allocated to ROEs for the Curriculum Evaluation Tool and Priority Learning Standards PD. 
  • $12,000,000 for high impact tutoring.
  • $25,463,6888 will be allocated towards special education cooperatives using a per pupil allocation that considers the percentage of adequacy of member districts. 
  • $42,857,142 will be allocated amongst all LEAs and non-title 1 LEA ROEs that provide evidence-based summer learning and enrichment. 
  • $7,692,739 will be provided to special education cooperatives that provide evidence-based summer learning and enrichment. Additionally, afterschool funds will be allocated in a similiar manner.
  • The state will allocate its 2.5% of reserve funds to non-title 1 schools on a per pupil of $142 students, bridge the digital provide, provide interim assessments, mentoring services for new principals, provided to affinity groups, create community partnerships to meet students' socio-emotional needs, and improve the teacher recruitment pipeline. 

More information here.

Indiana

 

$214,472,770

(ESSER I)

 

$888,183,537

(ESSER II)

 

$1,994,734,056

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$193,025,493 (ESSER I)

 

 

$799,365,183 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,795,260,650 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Indiana Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Indiana ESSER III Plan

 

 

$21,447,277

(ESSER I)

 

$88,818,354

(ESSER II)

 

$199,473,406

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Indiana Department of Education intends to use its SEA set-aside for the following:

  • Special populations and race/ethnic groups who are at additional risk, including but not limited to students with disabilities, English learners, migrants, foster, and homeless.
  • Small, rural locales with limited resources.
  • Educationally-related entities, such as juvenile correctional facilities, juvenile mental health facilities, and other public or non-profit facilities that target high-need populations.
  • Hard-hit areas, as determined by needs and data presented by the applicant.

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside for an opportunity grant for LEAs who did not receive ESSER II funds. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to create the Center for Excellence and Digital Leaning which will strengthen access to and improve the quality of virtual learning throughout the state. 
  • The Indiana College Core Initiative will provide free access to college courses that are required to comp0lete the Indiana College Core prior to entering a college or university.
  • The Regional Pathway Innovation Fund will be created to help reimagine education using a cross sectional.
  • The Indiana Legislature has allocated $150 million towards a grant called the Student Learning Recovery Grant to support accelerated learning programs for students most impacted by Covid-19. Read More.
  • Indiana Department of Education ESSER Information.

Iowa

 

$71,625,561

(ESSER I)

 

$344,864,294

(ESSER II)

 

$774,516,216

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$64,463,005 (ESSER I)

 

 

$310,377,865 (ESSER II)

 

 

$697,064,594 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Iowa Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Iowa ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$7,162,556

(ESSER I)

 

$34,486,429

(ESSER II)

 

$77,451,622

(ESSER III)

Governor Reynolds and the Iowa Department of Education are combining the GEER fund and state set-aside to provide $19.3 million to Iowa’s 327 school districts and nonpublic schools. The funding will be used for hotspots and providing a discount on broadband internet service or loaning devices to qualifying households.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The State will use funds to revise and adapt the state’s existing materials on evidence-based interventions to specifically address learning loss caused by Covid-19.
  • Funds will also be used to create and implement training and supportive processes and materials to help determine which activities should be done to reengage students.  

Kansas

 

$84,529,061

(ESSER I)

 

$344,864,294

(ESSER II)

 

$830,585,182

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$76,076,155 (ESSER I)

 

 

$332,846,815 (ESSER II)

 

 

$747,526,664 (ESSER III)

 

 

Kansas State Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Kansas ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$8,452,906

(ESSER I)

 

$36,982,979

(ESSER II)

 

$83,058,518

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “Kansas does not intend to use any of the 10% set-aside to address technological capacity/access and remote learning.”

 

ESSER II: The state will use their ESSER II set-aside funds for:

  • Ensuring that all districts receive at least $300 per student in ESSER II funds (ESSER II KSDE per-student additional allocation).
  • Granting $150,000 to the Kansas State Schools for the Blind and the Deaf, which do not receive funds through LEA distributions.
  • Providing the remainder of funding to districts to support special education over the 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 school years.

More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Kansas will purchase the “Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling” to help provide English Language Arts interventions. 
  • The NUMBERS professional development platform will be purchased to help teach address math skill deficiencies.
  • FastBridge, which combines computer-adaptive tests and curriculum-based measurements, will be utilized to create Kansas’s first statewide system of tracking student progress.
  • Funds will also be used to offer districts the ability to provide mini-test reports at the completion of a testing window.
  • The YMCA and Boys and Gils club will receive funds to work with students in primarily urban areas. In rural areas, 4-H will receive funds to work with students in those areas. These funds will be used for afterschool programs and summer learning.

Kentucky

 

$193,186,874

(ESSER I)

 

$928,274,720

(ESSER II)

 

$2,084,773,157

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$173,868,187 (ESSER I)

 

 

$835,447,248 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,876,295,841 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Kentucky Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Kentucky ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$19,318,687

(ESSER I)

 

$92,827,472

(ESSER II)

 

$208,477,316

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Kentucky Department of Education intends to use a portion of its SEA reserve to support the remote learning efforts provided by the Non-Traditional Instruction  program by expanding technological capacity, developing new resources, and developing a greater understanding of remote learning best practices across the state.”

 

ESSER II: The state will use $92.8 million from ESSER II set aside fund for use by the Kentucky School for the Deaf, Kentucky School for the Blind, and area technology centers and statewide projects. Additionally, the SEA will allocate funds to school districts based on a per-pupil basis among the LEAs that meet criteria for its use. Preliminary rules for accessing the set-aside money say districts must spend 85% of their allocated district ESSER II funds on direct services to support students. The goal is for districts to get a minimum of $75 per student. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The state is using $150,000 to expand the Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) as a summer enrichment and learning opportunity in 2021, 2022 and 2023. More information here.
  • $10,000,000 will be allocated to scaling professional development for teachers on the science of reading. 
  • $2,000,000 will be allocated to support schools’ and districts’ curriculum development process. 
  • $15,000,000 will be made available to implement evidence-based strategies in grades P-2.
  • $5,000,000 will be used to hire Education Recovery Specialists and Leaders to serve in Comprehensive Support and Improvement schools to assist and support staff in leadership, math, and literacy. $300,000 will fund the Jim Shipley and Associates Professional Development Workshops which will provide evidence-based professional learning opportunities to educators.
  • $1,300,000 will be used to continue maintaining the Infinite Campus Learning and Student Engagement Tool.
  • $5.5 million will fund the expansion of internet bandwidth.
  • $2,000,000 will establish a virtual school’s network with 100% enrollment in virtual learning.
  • $1,500,000 will go towards creating a Statewide Student eBook Library.
  • $2.85 million of its reserves to fund a second campus for the Governor’s School for the Arts.
  • $11.25 million for transition services and supports for afterschool and summer learning programs.

Louisiana

 

$286,980,175

(ESSER I)

 

$1,160,119,378

(ESSER II)

 

$2,605,463,325

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$258,282,158 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,044,107,440 (ESSER II)

 

 

$2,344,916,992 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Louisiana Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Louisiana ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$28,698,018

(ESSER I)

 

$116,011,938

(ESSER II)

 

$260,546,333

(ESSER III)

The Lousiana Department of Education intends to use its state set-aside to create an ESSER Incentive Grant to support key Strong Start 2020 Planning Priorities. School systems must commit to all Strong Start 2020 priorities and submit the application by May 29, 2020 to be eligible for ESSERF Incentive grants.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE) will use these funds to fund the Accelerate Program, High Quality Tutoring, and the Community Service App.
  • LDOE is creating a child welfare and attendance position to lead, manage, and implement various elements of the Child Welfare and Attendance Program throughout the state.
  • LDOE is also partnering with the LSU Social Research and Evaluation Center to promote good attendance practices for KK-12 students and schools. 
  • They will create a vendor guide to help schools choose from providers who have proven success. 

Maine

 

$43,793,319

(ESSER I)

 

$183,138,601

(ESSER II)

 

$411,303,282

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$39,413,987 (ESSER I)

 

 

$164,824,741 (ESSER II)

 

 

$370,172,954 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Maine Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Maine ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,379,332

(ESSER I)

 

$18,313,860

(ESSER II)

 

$41,130,328

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: "The Maine Department of Education intends to use its set-aside to provide access to remote learning through technology and providing educators with an online platform for learning and sharing best practicies and strategies for high quality remote learning. The Department will partner with a Learning Management System/Virtual Learning Environment vendor to design and customize an online platform to support interactive professional development and a student platform for statewide curriculum, instruction, lessons, units, and activities that can be accessed by students at any time."

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to develop and strengthen the state’s current career exploration opportunities for students. 
  • MDOE is establishing an extended learning program to support the development of extended learning opportunities (ELO) for students across the state and connect students to local industry employers during the fall of 2021 and beyond.
  • The Office of Federal Emergency Relief Programs will collaborate with the State Coordinator of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program to identify overlapping opportunities for expanding afterschool opportunities statewide. The Department’s objective is to be able to expand afterschool programs as well as provide additional subgrants to areas of Maine that are not currently served. 

More information here.

Maryland

 

$207,834,058

(ESSER I)

 

$868,771,243

(ESSER II)

 

$1,951,136,802

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$187,050,652 (ESSER I)

 

 

$781,894,119 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,756,023,122 (ESSER III)

 

 

Maryland ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$20,783,406

(ESSER I)

 

$86,877,124

(ESSER II)

 

$195,113,680

(ESSER III)

"The Maryland State Department of Education will use its set-aside to for procuring devices to increase access to remote learning. This includes:

  • Purchasing remote help desk and network management tools
  • Purchasing services that allow teachers to communicate with students and team members, and enable therapists to deliver services to students virtually
  • Professional development 
  • Support to return to traditional delivery of educational services

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds to address the impact of lost instructional time allocated to LEAs based on their Title 1 allocation. 
  • The Division of Curriculum, Instructional Improvement and Professional Learning (DCIIPL), in collaboration with other divisions and offices across the MSDE, has created a summer learning resource guide in response to the extended school closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. 
  • Funding was earmarked to provide services for English Learners and The Blueprint for Maryland’s Future will create a workgroup on English Language Learners to develop best practices.
  • MSDE will grant awards to support the creation of afterschool learning centers to provide academic enrichment opportunities during afterschool hours for children, particularly students who attend high-poverty and low performing schools.
  • $10 million dollars will go towards Regional Crises Response and Clinical Support Teams. 

  • $3.2 million will fund initiatives to address the effects of adverse childhoods. $2 million will go to the Achieving Academic Equity and Excellence for Black Boys Task Force.

  • $33.2 million will be reserved to address future needs. 

Massachusetts

 

$214,894,317

(ESSER I)

 

$814,890,396

(ESSER II)

 

$1,830,128,073

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$193,404,885 (ESSER I)

 

 

$733,401,356 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,647,115,266 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education guidance to LEAs

 

Massachusetts ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$21,489,432

(ESSER I)

 

$81,489,040

(ESSER II)

 

$183,012,807

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Massachusetts Department of Education intends to use a portion of its state reservation to support the implementation of remote learning guidance for students, families, and educators.”

 

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside for the following:

  • $25 million in grants for districts to operate Acceleration Academies. The Acceleration Academies will include Early Literacy Academies for incoming kindergarteners, rising 1st and 2nd graders; and Math Acceleration Academies for rising 3rd and 4th graders, as well as 8th and 10th graders.
  • $15 million to districts for a summer school matching grant to offer 4-to-6-week in-person programs with a mix of in-person academic and recreational activities.

More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) will offer support to Acceleration Academies, Summer School Matching Grants, Summer Acceleration to College, and the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) Summer Step Up program.
  • Additionally, the State will provide early literacy tutoring grants, K-8 math acceleration, and a program for advanced math students.

Michigan

 

$389,796,984

(ESSER I)

 

$1,656,308,286

(ESSER II)

 

$3,719,833,128

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$350,817,286 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,490,677,457 (ESSER II)

 

 

$3,347,849,815 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Michigan Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Michigan ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$38,979,698

(ESSER I)

 

$165,630,829

(ESSER II)

 

$371,983,313

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Michigan Department of Education intends to reserve up to 10% of the ESSER Fund to establish an educational equity fund. These dollars will be allocated to LEAs through subgrant applications.”

 

ESSER II: The legislature appropriated $160.1 million of the ESSER II set-aside funding in various categorical spending areas: $90.0 million for K-8 summer programs; $45.0 million for high school credit recovery programs; $17.4 million for before- and after-school programs operated by districts or intermediate school districts (ISDs); $4.9 million for benchmark assessments; and, $2.7 million for administration by the Michigan Department of Education (MDE). The bill leaves roughly $5.5 million in 'discretionary' ESSER funds unspent and available for future appropriation. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to for the Early Warning Intervention and Monitoring System (EWIMS) to identify at-risk students.
  • Math Recovery platform to improve student math skills.
  • Culturally Responsive School Leadership Institute Academies (CRSLIA) to improve cultural competency in school leaders.
  • Next Generation Science Exemplar program (NGSX) to promote science acheivement.

Minnesota

 

$140,137,253

(ESSER I)

 

$588,036,257

(ESSER II)

 

$1,320,645,901

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$126,123,528 (ESSER I)

 

 

$529,232,631 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,188,581,311 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Minnesota Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Minnesota ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$140,137,253

(ESSER I)

 

$58,803,626

(ESSER II)

 

$132,064,590

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Minnesota Department of Education (MDE) intends to use its 10% set-aside to assist LEAs that did not receive funds under the 90% ESSER funds formula allocation. The amount LEAs receive will be based on the number of free and reduced lunch eligible students. Funds may be used for: academic summer learning in order to address student learning gaps, technology staffing and training, and mental health services and supports.” LEAs should complete the application on the SERVS System to be considered for the grant. Grant FAQ.

 

ESSER II: The state will use $4.5 million from the ESSER II set-aside for Expanded Summer Programming available to Local Education Agencies (LEAs) not otherwise eligible to receive an ESSER II award. The allocation is based 60% on historically underserved populations served and 40% on enrollment in each school. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Allocations will go to LEAs who focus on their underserved populations especially those receiving special education services. 
  • Afterschool funding will go towards community organizations to support historically underserved populations. 50% of these funds will be dedicated to culturally specific organizations. 
  • Summer Learning funding will be coordinated through Ignite Afterschool, the Minnesota affiliate of the National Afterschool Association and member of the 50-State Afterschool Networks.

Mississippi

 

$169,883,002

(ESSER I)

 

$724,532,847

(ESSER II)

 

$1,627,197,854

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$152,894,702 (ESSER I)

 

 

$652,079,562 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,464,478,069 (ESSER III)

The Mississippi Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

 

 

 

$16,988,300

(ESSER I)

 

$72,453,285

(ESSER II)

 

$162,719,785

(ESSER III)

“The Mississippi Department of Education intends to support technological capacity and access – including hardware and software, connectivity, and instructional expertise – to support remote learning within school districts, through activities such as the development and deployment of guidance and professional learning opportunities for teachers focused on best practices in instructional technology integration, distance learning instructional approaches, and learning management systems. Professional development opportunities will include a focus on how districts how can serve students experiencing homelessness, foster care youth, English learners, children with disabilities, racial and ethnic minorities, and low- income students. The SEA also intends to support remote learning by developing new informational and academic resources and expanding awareness of, and access to, best practices and innovations in remote learning and support for students, families, and educators, through activities such as the incentivization of distance learning models and training for various stakeholder groups on learning management systems.”

Missouri

 

$208,443,300

(ESSER I)

 

$871,172,291

(ESSER II)

 

$1,956,529,215

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$187,598,970 (ESSER I)

 

 

$784,055,062 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,760,876,294 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education guidance to LEAs

 

Missouri ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$20,844,330

(ESSER I)

 

$87,117,229

(ESSER II)

 

$195,652,921

(ESSER III)

“The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (MODESE) intends to use a portion of the SEA reserve to develop and disseminate professional development resources in regards to distance learning.”

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • They will expand the Missouri Leadership Development System which provides support to Principals. 
  • Content Specialists will be placed in each of the 9 Regional Professional Development Centers and split the specialist equally amongst English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Reading. 
  • Additionally, the state is working with SchoolSmart KC to develop competency-based learning to prepare students for life after high school. 

Montana

 

$41,295,230

(ESSER I)

 

$170,099,465

(ESSER II)

 

$382,019,236

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$37,165,707

(ESSER I)

 

$153,089,519 (ESSER II)

 

 

$343,817,312 (ESSER III)

 

 

 

The Montana Office of Public Instruction guidance to LEAs

 

Montana ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,129,523

(ESSER I)

 

$17,009,947

(ESSER II)

 

$38,201,924

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Montana Office of Public Instruction will use its set-aside for the following:

  • Directing funds to LEAs to a minimum of $10,000 per elementary and high school program.
  • SPED allocation to LEAs who are not SPED cooperative members.
  • SPED allocation to SPED cooperative members and passed through to SPED cooperatives.

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside for the following:

  • $6.8 million as a supplemental allocation to further offset enrollment-based budget shortfalls.
  • $1.2 million for targeted support to districts that may need additional assistance.
  • The legislature is also proposing to allocate $13.4 million in ESSER II and ESSER III funds for database modernization at Office of Public Instruction, affording the agency a chance to improve or replace data systems at public schools across the state (HB 630). More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • HB 632, requires that the Montana Office of Public Instruction (OPI) create a system that builds the capacity of Montana’s education professionals to respond to the impact of Covid-19 on Montana’s students. OPI will provide material support, professional development, just-in-time support, data support, technical assistance, collaborative projects, and professional learning for OPI staff. More information here.  
  • OPI will provide and create a Summer Learning Enrichment  and Afterschool planning guide.

Nebraska

 

$65,085,085

(ESSER I)

 

$243,073,530

(ESSER II)

 

$545,908,619

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$58,576,577 (ESSER I)

 

 

$218,766,177 (ESSER II)

 

 

$491,317,757 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Nebraska Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Nebraska ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$6,508,509

(ESSER I)

 

$24,307,353

(ESSER II)

 

$54,590,862

(ESSER III)

“The Nebraska Department of Education intends to use its state set aside to:

  • Enhance technology infrastructure (broadband, devices, platforms, data privacy) for students and families.
  • Build supports for planning for possible interruptions upon returning to school and student and staff reentry.
  • Ensure student nutritional needs are met.
  • Provide professional learning to support inclusive remote learning environment and engagement, along with best practices for different student groups.
  • Create or expand mental, behavioral, and social emotional supports.”

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The NDE has entered into a contract with the Nebraska Children and Families Foundation (NCFF) to support and monitor the implementation of expanded learning programs (both after-school and summer-school) throughout the state using ESSER III funds.
  • Grants will be modeled after Nebraska’s 21st Century Program and will consist of 3 types: Incubator, Expansion, and Centers of Innovation.
    • Incubator grants will be three-year grants support start up programming in underserved schools/communities and will include $150k for high school and $75k for elementary and middle school programs. 
    • Expansion Grants will be 1-3 years with using the 21st Century Per Pupil Allocation metric and will be for historically underserved communities. Expansion grants may be used for After School Programming. 
    • Centers of Innovation – one to three-year grants to support for new innovations that will support the expansion of ELO programs across the state 

Nevada

 

$117,185,045

(ESSER I)

 

$477,322,438

(ESSER II)

 

$1,071,998,392

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$105,466,541 (ESSER I)

 

 

$429,590,194 (ESSER II)

 

 

$964,798,553 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Nevada Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Nevada ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$11,718,505

(ESSER I)

 

$47,732,244

(ESSER II)

 

$107,199,839

(ESSER III)

“The Nevada Department of Education intends to reserve the full 10% of its allocation to support statewide activities regarding distance learning funding, resources and tools that will support remote learning.” NDE released the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) Grant. LEAs should apply by Aug. 15, 2020, to be considered.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The Nevada Department of Education (NDE) Office of Student and School Supports is working in partnership with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in reviewing of evidence-based providers.
  • The Nevada Department of Education will work with LEAs and stakeholders to identify students and provide evidence-based interventions in the areas of social and emotional supports, credit recovery, and instructional supports.
  • In addition, NDE used federal funds to develop a module in Infinite Campus (Nevada’s student information system used by all LEAs) for use by school social workers, counselors, and other Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP). 

New Hampshire

 

$37,641,372

(ESSER I)

 

$156,065,807

(ESSER II)

 

$350,501,633

(ESSER III)

 

t

 

 

 

 

$33,877,235 (ESSER I)

 

$140,459,226 (ESSER II)

 

 

$315,451,470 (ESSER III)

 

 

The New Hampshire Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

New Hampshire ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

 

$3,764,137

(ESSER I)

 

$15,606,581

(ESSER II)

 

$35,050,163 (ESSER III)

“The New Hampshire Department of Education intends to use its set-aside to further develop our remote instruction capacity, with a focus on under-served communities and constituencies. Remote instruction capacity includes access, devices, applications and training for students, families and educators as well as other activities deemed necessary by the New Hampshire Department of Education to increase capacity.”

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Community-based organization partnerships will be leveraged to support student groups disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 in the use of ARP ESSER state funds.
  • They will partner with an adult education center to provide similar such services statewide—instruction including in digital literacy, technology and internet, new parent information modules/sessions, and new joint family literacy activities—utilizing ARP ESSER state funds. 

New Jersey

 

$310,371,213

(ESSER I)

 

$1,230,971,757

(ESSER II)

 

$2,764,587,703

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$279,334,092 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,107,874,581 (ESSER II)

 

 

$2,488,128,933 (ESSER III)

 

The New Jersey Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

New Jersey ARPA ESSER III Plans

 

 

$31,037,121

(ESSER I)

 

$123,097,176

(ESSER II)

 

$276,458,770

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: "The New Jersey Department of Education intends to use a portion of its set-aside for the following:

  • Directing funds to LEAs that did not receive Title I funds will receive funds from the ESSER fund
  • Public educational institutions in which public school students are educated, that were not eligible for an allocation from the formula portion of the grant as a result of not being an LEA. Specifically, these subgrants will be provided to: Special Services School Districts (SSSDs); educational institutions run by State agencies including the Department of Children and Families (DCF) and the Department of Corrections (DOC); the Juvenile Justice Centers; and Juvenile Detention Centers
  • Support formula grants to LEAs for the purchase of 1:1 instructional devices (e.g., Chromebooks, iPads) and connectivity
  • Develop a Memorandum of Understanding with Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, to address the Social-Emotional Learning needs of students impacted by COVID-19
  • The New Jersey Department of Education has established a seventeen month grant program to support projects that implement evidence-based interventions or quality instructional strategies to address student learning loss through additional mathematics and/or English language arts literacy (ELA) instruction; and/or social-emotional learning (SEL) support.

    This competitive grant program is open to New Jersey public school districts, including charter schools and Renaissance schools. Each eligible applicant may apply for up to $156,425. This seventeen month grant program will begin April 1, 2021 and will end on August 31, 2022.

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set aside for the following:

  • $75 million to establish the Learning Acceleration Grant.
    • 75% f those funds will go to support research-based academic enrichment activities such as summer learning academies, school year learning acceleration academies, and 1:1 tutoring.
    • 25% f those funds will go to activities that support the broader learning ecosystem, such as evidence-based strategies to cultivate a growth mindset in students, professional learning for educators in the use of formative assessments, and the use of extended instructional time to effectively scaffold students’ learning, as well as integrate parents and educators into a multi-tiered system of supports.
  • $30 million for the provision of mental health services and supports.

More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The NJDOE will allocate $134,996,987 to establish an “Acceleration Coach and Educator Support” formula grant for LEAs. LEAs will use these grant funds to implement professional learning for educators and other school staff in skills and topics that will empower them to better meet the needs of their students.
  • $3,232,398 to implement screener assessments that help evaluate and ensure student readiness for learning, including the Start Strong assessment and the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment.
  • The NJDOE will allocate $27,645,877 to establish a Summer Enrichment Activities formula grant to LEAs.
  • The NJDOE will allocate $27,645,877 to establish a Comprehensive Beyond the School Day Activities formula grant to LEAs.
  • In partnership institutions of higher education (IHEs) and other consultants , NJDOE will allocate part of its 2.5% reserve to create “accelerated learning educator response teams” in districts, providing direct learning acceleration supports such as job embedded coaching, accelerated learning toolkits, comprehensive professional learning opportunities, and statewide access to standards-based K–12 digital content in all content areas to strengthen how technology can be used to empower learners.
  • More information here.

New Mexico

 

$108,574,786

(ESSER I)

 

$435,938,638

(ESSER II)

 

$979,056,256

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$97,717,307 (ESSER I)

 

 

$392,344,774 (ESSER II)

 

 

$881,150,630 (ESSER III)

 

 

The New Mexico Public Education Department guidance to LEAs

 

New Mexico ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$10,857,479

(ESSER I)

 

$43,593,864

(ESSER II)

 

$97,905,626

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The New Mexico Public Education Department proposes to allocate the 9.5% of ESSER

funds available for distribution at the discretion of the SEA to education entities,

including LEAs, for the following purposes:

  • Closing the Digital Divide (mobile devices, internet connectivity, professional development for online learning, and related purchases): 60%
  • Social and Emotional Learning Supports: 19%
  • Supporting students with disabilities and students in need of at-risk services (during a building closure or during a transition back into the school building): 10%
  • PPE, Building Sanitization and Cleaning Supplies: 2%
  • Other, to be determined as needs emerge during the return to school and during the school year: 9% NMPED will distribute funds via grants. Education entities’ eligibility for these grants will be based in part on their percentage and/or number of low-income children or students, children with disabilities, English learners, racial and ethnic minorities, students experiencing homelessness, and foster care youth.”

ESSER II: The state is using the ESSER II set-aside to provide a grant to a handful of school districts. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will provide customized professional learning opportunities aligned to Acceleration and Multi Layered Systems of Support with a focus supporting Districts/Charters, tutoring, and tutoring tracking dashboard.
  • NMPED has set up a joint program with local municipalities to provide summer internships for students. NMPED will provide grants to districts and partner organizations to provide summer programming that is designed to facilitate enrichment activities focused on one of five following targeted areas; 1) STEM programs, 2) outdoor, environmental education programs, 3) museum-based, arts, or cultural programs, 4) at-risk youth and teen-oriented programs, 5) land-based, agricultural, or CTE type programs. NMPED will continue to contract with Graduation Alliance to bolster the Engage NM project which provides a personal academic coach and counselor to support students struggling with engagement and/or chronic absenteeism. 
  • NMPED will prioritize the allocation of these funds to those LEAs that do not have schools participating in the 21st Century Learning Community program. Additionally, the funds used for after school programming in community schools may be used for modified programming where the after-school program is implemented at the local homeless shelter as appropriate. The paid internship program for high school students will prioritize students who are homeless, highly mobile, and migrant. 

New York

 

$1,037,045,603

(ESSER I)

 

$4,002,381,738

(ESSER II)

 

$8,988,780,836

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$933,341,043 (ESSER I)

 

 

$3,602,143,564 (ESSER II)

 

 

$8,089,902,752 (ESSER III)

 

 

The New York State Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

New York ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$108,574,786

(ESSER I)

 

$400,238,174

(ESSER II)

 

$898,878,084

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: ESSER funds to school districts were programmed by the Division of the Budget and the Legislature in the 2020-21 enacted New York State budget through the application of a “pandemic adjustment” to partially offset the state share of state aid to school districts.

 

ESSER II: The legislature allocated the ESSER II set-aside and GEER II funds to provide school districts of lower wealth with a minimum per pupil allocation. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • NYSED will provide LEAs with best practices and guidance to enable Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and Culturally Responsive Sustaining (CRSE) approaches to be integrated in ways that will support student recovery and development following the pandemic. 
  • NYSED will collaborate with the Mental Health Association of New York State to provide LEAs with Mental Health First Aid Training. Mental Health First Aid is a public education program that introduces participants to risk factors and warning signs of mental illnesses, builds understanding of their impact, and overviews common supports.
  • $195 million to support a multi-year expansion of new full-day 4-year-old universal prekindergarten expansion grants.
  • $15 million for prekindergarten expansion grants via a competitive bid.
  • $35 million to support NYC charter school facilities. 

North Carolina

 

$396,311,607

(ESSER I)

 

$1,602,590,987

(ESSER II)

 

$3,599,191,706

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$356,680,446 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,442,331,888 (ESSER II)

 

 

$3,239,272,535 (ESSER III)

 

 

The North Carolina State Board of Education guidance to LEAs

 

North Carolina ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$39,631,161

(ESSER I)

 

$160,259,099

(ESSER II)

 

$359,919,171

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The North Carolina State Board of Education elects to reserve 10% of its set-aside. It will direct NCDPI to administer grants and contracts to address emergency-related priorities:

  • Assistance to public school units in developing and implementing plans with emphasis on disadvantaged population and ensuring equitable student opportunities.
  • The needs of Exceptional Children
  • Funding student support workers and professionals to address social-emotional need.”

ESSER II: The legislature appropriated ESSER II state set-aside across 15 line items. The bill requests up to $10 million be distributed to ensure every public school unit in the state receives at least $180.00 per pupil. The bill allocates roughly $70 million to public schools to provide additional mental health support services, school nutrition services, literacy training programs, services for at-risk children, and security. The bill also directs another $66 million to be held in reserve for schools to address learning loss during the summer. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • NCDPI will deploy a competency-based education platform for statewide use to enable personalized pathways for mastery learning. NCDPI is currently working with a third-party contractor who will provide an impact analysis of COVID-19 on public school units, students and families of the State.
  • LEAs implement a school extension and enrichment program for at-risk students as defined in NC General Statute. The law requires the NC DPI to develop a report on the outcomes of the program to be presented to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee. The Office of Learning Recovery and Acceleration will develop and deliver the report in January 2022.
  • NCDPI has proposed the development of a flexible spending account using the 2.5% reserve funds to address the needs of the department, in consultation with the State Board of Education, and PSUs as needs arise that might be identified as an emergency need. 

North Dakota

 

$33,297,699

(ESSER I)

 

$135,924,393

(ESSER II)

 

$305,266,879

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$29,967,929 (ESSER I)

 

 

$122,331,954 (ESSER II)

 

 

$274,740,191 (ESSER III)

 

 

The North Dakota Department of Public Instruction guidance to LEAs

 

North Dakota ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$3,329,770

(ESSER I)

 

$13,592,439

(ESSER II)

 

$30,526,688

(ESSER III)

“The North Dakota Department of Public Instruction (NDDPI) has engaged in initial conversations regarding the potential use of our SEA reserve included as part of the ESSER funds. NDDPI has identified some potential uses of these funds as it pertains to the following areas:

  • Technological Capacity and Access Remote learning.
  • Remote Learning."

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Edmentum’s Exact Path will continue to be provided to all K-12 students. Funding will also be sued to fund early learning for four-year old's, Waterford Upstart, Early Learning Bridge Grants, and an Equity Audit.
  • Additionally, funding use to improve graduation rates and to scale up an early warning system for students.
  • 800 additional slots will be funded for the Waterford Upstart Grant program. 

Ohio

 

$489,205,200

(ESSER I)

 

$1,991,251,095

(ESSER II)

 

$4,472,067,097

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$440,284,680 (ESSER I)

 

 

$1,792,125,986 (ESSER II)

 

 

$4,024,860,387 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Ohio Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Ohio ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$48,920,520

(ESSER I)

 

$199,125,110

(ESSER II)

 

$447,206,710

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Ohio Department of Education is using a portion of its state set-aside towards the BroadbandOhio Connectivity Grant, a new $15 million grant for remote education supports for schools.

 

ESSER II: The state is using the ESSER II set-aside to provide formula grants to school districts to ensure each district receives a minimum baseline per pupil funding.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The State will work with the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Summer Learning Association identify and implement best summer learning practices. 
  • Funds will be used to expand the 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant Program. Additionally, funds will go towards the Ohio Afterschool Network. 

Oklahoma

 

$160,950,476

(ESSER I)

 

$665,038,753

(ESSER II)

 

$1,493,582,570

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$144,855,428 (ESSER I)

 

 

$598,534,878 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,344,224,313 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Oklahoma State Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Oklahoma ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

$16,095,048

(ESSER I)

 

$66,503,875

(ESSER II)

 

$149,358,257

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: Governor Kevin Stitt and State Supt. of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister announced that they have partnered to give eligible Oklahoma school districts an opportunity to apply for $16 million in emergency relief funds through the CARES Act. The incentive grant funds were made available through $8 million from the Oklahoma State Department of Education (OSDE) set-aside amount from the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) Fund and $8 million from the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) discretionary funds. Districts will apply for Incentive Grants through the OSDE Grants Management System, and eligible expenditures must be reimbursed between July 1, 2020, and June 30, 2022. Additionally, the Oklahoma State Department of Education will also use their state set-aside for CARES Act Hotspot Grants.

 

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside to provide $49 million to 88 Oklahoma school districts that had received limited funds. OSDE determined that any district that had received less than $550 per student in ESSER II funds was awarded a portion of the $49 million. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to create a Tutoring Corps and School Counselor Corps.
  • YMCA is hosting 63 summer youth development programming sites across the state to support holistic youth-development programming designed to support student success by providing social-emotional skills training, academic enrichment programs, mental health support, health and nutrition programming and family engagement activities at highly subsidized programming outreach sites with a strong emphasis on school district partnerships
  • $9.1 million, will be distributed via a competitive grant process to allow for additional summer programs across the state in 2022 and 2023.
  • Afterschool funding will be used to expand current 21st Century Learning Centers throughout the State. Though opportunities are made available to all Oklahoma students, for purposes of these grants, the OSDE will work with Boys & Girls Clubs and YMCA Clubs of Oklahoma to enhance evidence-based afterschool programs.
  • Funding from the 2.5% reserve amount may be used to expand the Dolly Parton Imagination Library

Oregon

 

$121,099,019

(ESSER I)

 

$499,153,891

(ESSER II)

 

$1,121,028,734

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$108,989,117 (ESSER I)

 

 

$449,238,502 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,008,925,861 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Oregon Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Oregon ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

$12,109,902

(ESSER I)

 

$49,915,389

(ESSER II)

 

 

$112,102,873

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Oregon Department of Education (ODE) will provide over $21 million of both its state set-aside reserve and GEER Funds to support LEAs and other education partners with emergency grants that may be used to address access to internet and technology, and equipment necessary for remote learning.  

 

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside for the following:

  • Provide a minimum grant to Title-I eligible districts
  • Youth Corrections Education Program
  • Juvenile Detention Education Program
  • Long-Term Care and Treatment Program
  • Early Intervention and Early Child Special Education
  • Regional Programs
  • Oregon School for the Deaf

More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • $10 million federal dollars in grant funding to participating LEAs for academic summer school to support high school students facing academic credit loss, summer enrichment programs, and wrap-around child care.
  • The Student Success Act Summer Programs Grant is a $3 million dollar investment each summer beginning in 2021 for schools that are considered high poverty under Title I-A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; have significant achievement gaps; and have been determined by ODE to require additional support and interventions based on school performance.
  • Reserve funds will be used to address Funding Gaps for LEAs and Public Schools, specialized education services for vulnerable populations, and support technical assistance for Emergency Planning.

Pennsylvania

 

$523,807,198

(ESSER I)

 

$2,224,964,030

(ESSER II)

 

$4,996,953,151

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$471,426,478 (ESSER I)

 

 

$2,002,467,627 (ESSER II)

 

 

$4,497,257,836 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Pennsylvania Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Pennsylvania ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$52,380,720

(ESSER I)

 

$222,496,403

(ESSER II)

 

$499,695,315

(ESSER III)

“The Pennsylvania Department of Education intends to use its state reservation plans include:

  • Expanding access to equitable statewide online blended, and offline learning platforms, with particular attention to access for students with disabilities, English learners, students in concentrated poverty, and other at-risk student populations;
  •  Strengthening support and accountability for full-time virtual schools while building
  • local capacity to design, deliver, and evaluate the efficacy of online and blended learning;
  • Supporting intensive teacher and school leader professional development on remote delivery and pedagogy;
  • Providing direct resources and technical assistance to close learning and nonacademic gaps stemming from extended school closures.”

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) plans to provide all LEAs with a list of evidence-based interventions through the PDE Evidence Resource Center (ERC), a customized website designed by Pennsylvania educators and some of the nation's foremost education scholars.
  • $43.5 million to go toward area career and technology education center.
  • $15 million will go to approved private schools, the chartered schools for the education of deaf or the blind, and private residential rehabilitative institutions.
  • $43.5 million to IUs to provide technical support and training to school entities.
  • $14 million to schools with an ESSA designation of A-TSI.
  • $19.9 million to educational programs for neglected, delinquent, and at-risk youth.
  • Pennsylavania Department of Education Website.

Rhode Island

 

$46,350,444

(ESSER I)

 

$184,791,567

(ESSER II)

 

$415,015,610 (ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$41,715,400 (ESSER I)

 

 

$166,312,410 (ESSER II)

 

 

$373,514,049 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Rhode Island Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Rhode Island ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,635,044

(ESSER I)

 

$18,479,157

(ESSER II)

 

$41,501,561

(ESSER III)

"The Rhode Island Department of Education intends to use its set-aside to support:

  • Rebuilding a system that can reimagine the traditional classroom structures; needs of the workforce; cleaning, disinfecting and sanitizing; as well as transportation and other services.
  • Optimizing resources for state-state, state-district or district-district partnerships.
  • Developing mechanisms for ongoing communication with agency staff and routines to help facilitate cross-agency staff engagement, reduction in duplication of efforts, and amplification of the agency’s impact.
  • Automating and/or streamlining existing public-facing agency services in order to ensure successful continued operations virtually, and establishing clear resources or tools to enable effective telework as needed. Specifically, this can be achieved by implementing a more effective performance management system.

Additionally, the SEA shall develop a resource compendium of evidence-based strategies for remediating gaps in learning and addressing the mental health and wellness of students during and after distance learning."

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • For 1- and 2-Star LEAs (LEAs identified as low performing through district accountability), they will be eligible for a strategic support matching grant through a portion of RIDE’s state set-aside dollars, currently called the LEAP District Support Program.

  • RIDE will be significantly expanding summer learning options statewide through its All-Course Network (ACN) platform. The ACN provides free courses to students across the state, with courses developed and run by postsecondary institutions, community-based organizations, municipalities, and local education agencies. All of these courses are posted on an easy-to-use centralized registration website, called EnrollRI.

  • Using the state’s successful 21st Century Community Learning Center (RI 21st CCLC) grant model as a guide, RIDE will use funds under section 2001(f)(3) of the ARP Act to support partnerships between LEA and Community Based Organizations (CBOs) to provide comprehensive afterschool programming. Grantees will design their programs using the RI 21st CCLC Theory of Action and follow the Rhode Island Afterschool Quality Standards.

South Carolina

 

$216,311,158

(ESSER I)

 

$940,420,782

(ESSER II)

 

$2,112,051,487

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$194,680,042 (ESSER I)

 

 

$846,378,704 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,900,846,338 (ESSER III)

 

 

The South Carolina Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

South Carolina ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$21,631,116

(ESSER I)

 

$94,042,078

(ESSER II)

 

$211,205,149

(ESSER III)

“The South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE) intends to use some portion of its ESSER state reserve funds on technology capacity, access, and remote learning.”

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to provide training and instructional materials to schools where 33 percent or more of 3rd graders scored in the lowest performance level, Does Not Meet (DNM), on the 2019 state summative assessment, SC READY, English language arts (ELA) Assessment.

  • In partnership with SC First Steps to School Readiness (First Steps), the SCDE will use ARP ESSER funds to transition students into pre-kindergarten and kindergarten, recruit and retain pre-kindergarten teachers, engage parents, and monitor the physical and mental health of early learners through early identification and referrals to appropriate medical care. 

  • In collaboration with the SCAC, the SCDE will invite LEAs to include in summer programs innovative enrichment interventions that are aligned to the SC College- and Career-Ready Standards for English Language Arts and for Mathematics.

  • Using the RALLY Tool and state summative assessment data, the SCDE will identify students in all subgroups who are scoring below proficiency and need annual growth as well as accelerated growth. Evidence-based strategies for each subgroup will be aligned to the specific needs of each group of students to ensure equity and access. 

  • The SCDE will reserve a proportion of its ARP ESSER funds to supplement $85 million of state funding to be set aside for facility upgrades of small, rural, and high poverty LEAs with aging buildings.

South Dakota

 

$41,295,230

(ESSER I)

 

$170,099,465

(ESSER II)

 

$382,019,236 (ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$37,165,707 (ESSER I)

 

 

$153,089,519 (ESSER II)

 

 

$343,817,312 (ESSER III)

 

 

The South Dakota Department of Education guidance to LEAs 

 

South Dakota ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$4,129,523

(ESSER I)

 

$17,009,947

(ESSER II)

 

$38,201,924

(ESSER III)

“The South Dakota Department of Education (SDDOE) plans to use the 10% set-aside on the following:

  • Administration for the ESSER grant funds (.5%)
  • Make additional awards to LEAs with remaining 9.5% to supplement activities related to the 12 Uses of Funds.”

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The department will use its reserve funds in this area to target interventions during the 2021-22 school year, summer of 2022, and beyond. Equipped with evidence and analysis, the department will be able to select meaningful, evidence-based interventions that have positive, long-term impact on students’ academic, social, emotional, and mental health needs.

  • Once the highest needs are determined, the department will work, in coordination with districts and community-based organizations, to support partners in providing evidence-based summer school programming, including targeting student groups that demonstrate significant learning loss. 

  • Afterschool funding will be used to leverage partnerships to provide supports to highly impacted student groups and areas.

Tennessee

 

$259,891,154

(ESSER I)

 

$1,107,656,022

(ESSER II)

 

$2,487,638,081

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$233,902,039 (ESSER I)

 

 

$996,890,420 (ESSER II)

 

 

$2,238,874,273 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Tennessee Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Tennessee ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$25,989,115

(ESSER I)

 

$110,765,602

(ESSER II)

 

$248,763,808

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Tennessee Department of Education intends to use its set-aside on the following:

  • Technology ($13M).
  • Online Resource ($4M).
  • Grow Your Own ($2M).
  • Mental Health and Community Resources ($1.5M).
  • Leadership Development ($0.5M).
  • District Accelerator ($1M)
  • Innovation ($3M).

TN Set-Aside FAQ

 

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set-aside fund for:

  • $14 million for a grant opportunity to establish the new Innovative High School Models program, intended to empower local communities and collaborate to boost student readiness and prepare students for a bright future in high-demand jobs in their region.  More information here.
  • $30 million to help 21 school districts create new paths to employment for students through its Innovative High School Models program. More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The statewide tutoring model, TN ALL Corps, will ensure Tennessee students have access to high-dosage, low ratio tutoring over the next three years.

Texas

 

$1,285,886,064

(ESSER I)

 

$5,529,552,209

(ESSER II)

 

$12,418,588,778

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$1,157,297,458 (ESSER I)

 

 

$4,976,596,988 (ESSER II)

 

 

$11,176,729,900 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Texas Education Agency guidance to LEAs

 

Texas ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$128,588,606

(ESSER I)

 

$552,955,221

(ESSER II)

 

$1,241,858,878

(ESSER III)

“The Texas Education Agency (TEA) will reserve the allowable 0.5% for agency administration of the formula grant grants and discretionary projects. TEA plans to budget a majority of the 9.5%

discretionary set-aside to implement a series of interdisciplinary projects to continue distance learning and to upgrade remote learning resources in a variety of school settings. These projects will serve all student groups including disadvantaged populations.

The projects will incorporate various strategies through multi-tiered systems of support and research-based approaches to meeting the needs of different student populations. The planned discretionary projects include the following:

  • Additional Direct LEA COVID-19 Funds
  • Online Summer Bridge to College Access
  • District Remote Learning Diagnostic and Academic Recovery Support
  • Free Remote Education Delivery System
  • Whole School Redesign for Online Learning Support
  • Project Restore
  • Remote Dyslexia Instruction Platform.”

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be used to provide high dosage tutoring, quality instructional materials, job embedded professional learning, extended school day and year, and summer learning programs.

Utah

 

$67,821,787

(ESSER I)

 

$274,071,684

(ESSER II)

 

$615,526,070

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$61,039,608 (ESSER I)

 

 

$246,664,516 (ESSER II)

 

 

$553,973,463 (ESSER III)

The Utah State Board of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Utah ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$6,782,179

(ESSER I)

 

$27,407,168

(ESSER II)

 

$61,552,607

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Utah State Board of Education intends to use its set-aside for the following:

  • Technological capacity and access – including hardware and software, connectivity, and instructional expertise to support remote learning.
    • The state will focus on needs in remote locations of the state that do not currently have access to broadband, cellular, or microwave internet service, such as areas of San Juan School District. These areas are highlighted on our Utah broadband infrastructure map available: https://bit.ly/UETNNetworkMap.
    • The state will focus on the needs in the 65 charter school communities that are not currently participating in the state’s Digital Teaching and Learning program, as they may lack infrastructure and resources for remote learning.
  • Remote learning by developing new and expanded informational and academic resources. In addition, there will be focus on expanding awareness of, and access to, best practices and innovations in remote learning as well as additional support for students, families, and educators.
  • Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) by providing professional learning for teacher leaders, creating open education digital modules, and providing resources for additional mental health services in transition back to school.”

ESSER II: The Utah State Board of Education has established a base allocation for all LEAs using the ESSER II state set aside. More information here.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • USBE will utilize evidence-based practices meeting Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) criteria for evidence-based interventions.
  • The Utah State Board of Education (USBE) is working to align the two funding streams for evidence-based summer learning and evidenced-based afterschool programming into a competitive grant application process.

Vermont

 

$31,148,360

(ESSER I)

 

$126,973,363

(ESSER II)

 

$285,164,138

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$28,033,524 (ESSER I)

 

 

$114,276,027 (ESSER II)

 

 

$256,647,724 (ESSER III)

The Vermont Agency of Education guidance to LEAs

 

 

$3,114,836

(ESSER I)

 

$12,697,336

(ESSER II)

 

$28,516,414

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: “The Vermont Agency of Education intends to use some portion of its SEA reserve to develop strategies to address technology infrastructure and access to support remote learning and expand supports for students, families, and educators. These strategies will include:

  • The implementation of an integrated helpdesk and knowledge center solution to coordinate and expand the SEA’s ability to assist LEAs in implementing remote learning, and better enable the SEA to deliver targeted assistance to those LEAs requiring additional support.
  • The design and implementation of a remote learning communications ecosystem to facilitate the rapid development and sharing of best practices among teachers statewide.
  • The provision of online support resources to address the social and emotional needs to students and their families.”

ESSER IIThe state will use $3.5 million from the ESSER II federal funds to provide a Burlington High School facility renovation grant. More information here.

 

ESSER III: The Legislature appropriated $3.5 million of the ESSER III fund on literacy initiatives, $3.4 million on a grant program for schools with wrap-around support services. More information here.

Virginia 

 

$238,599,192

(ESSER I)

 

$939,280,578

(ESSER II)

 

$2,109,490,751

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$214,739,273 (ESSER I)

 

 

$845,352,520 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,898,541,676 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Virginia Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Virginia ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$23,859,919

(ESSER I)

 

$93,928,058

(ESSER II)

 

$210,949,075

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Virginia Department of Education will use a portion of its SEA reserve to support remote learning through increased technological access and development of resources to support students, families, and educators. Planned initiatives, informed by Continuity for Learning Task Force and the Return to Schooling Recovery Task Force include:

  • Expansion of the Virtual Virginia outreach program PK-12.
  • Expansion of instructional content and lessons offered via WHRO/PBS television.
  • Expansion GoOpenVA openly-licenses education resources to support online instruction.
  • Regional and LEA grants to support teacher training and professional development.
  • Targeted, needs-based LEA grants to increase intent access, provide funding for technology equipment, and other resources.
  • Development or purchase of a statewide learning management system that can be accessed remotely by all Virginia educators.

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set aside amount for the following:

  • $8.8 million to develop a through year student growth assessment in grades three through eight, pursuant to the passage of House Bill 2027 and Senate Bill 1357.
  • $30 million for a grant-based program to address learning loss and other student support needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • $55 million for the Virginia LEARNS Education Recovery grants to help school districts expand and implement targeted initiatives to address learning loss. More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • $105 million to address unfinished learning.
  • $21 million for afterschool programs and $21 million for summer learning.
  • During the August 2021 Special Session, the Virginia General Assembly appropriated $11.5 million in ARP ESSER funding to support recruitment efforts for LEAs to fill instructional positions between August 15, 2021, and November 15, 2021. Priority for distribution will be to school divisions experiencing the most acute difficulties in recruiting qualified teachers.

Washington

 

$216,892,447

(ESSER I)

 

$824,852,290

(ESSER II)

 

$1,852,501,071

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$195,203,202 (ESSER I)

 

 

$742,367,061 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,667,250,964 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction guidance to LEAs

 

Washington ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$21,689,245

(ESSER I)

 

$82,485,229

(ESSER II)

 

$185,250,107

(ESSER III)

Of the 10% of the total ESSER funds is allocated to the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 9.8% will be in reserve status, the remaining 0.2% will be reserved to help non-Title I districts prepare for school opening.

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • $4.94 million to accelerate learning through implementing through Alternative Learning Experiences(ALE).
  • $3.1 million to improve science and mathmatics instruction.
  • $3.1 million to improve pathways for Native American Educators.
  • $1.88 million to implement Comprehensive K-12 School Counselor Programs.

West Virginia

 

$86,640,471

(ESSER I)

 

$339,032,096

(ESSER II)

 

$761,417,928

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$77,976,424 (ESSER I)

 

 

$305,128,886 (ESSER II)

 

 

$685,276,135 (ESSER III)

The West Virginia Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

West Virginina ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$8,664,047

(ESSER I)

 

$33,903,210

(ESSER II)

 

$76,141,793

(ESSER III)

 

ESSER I:The West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE will utilize the remaining $8,664,047 (10%) to coordinate with the Governor and other state agencies to improve internet access for underserved geographical areas of the state as lack of internet access. The program is called Kids Connect initiative which will provide internet access for students across the state. Kids Connect is a joint effort between the Governor’s Office of Technology, the WVDE, and the Higher Education Policy Commission to establish over 1,000 free wireless internet access points at Pre-K-12 schools, libraries, higher education facilities, National Guard armories, and State Parks in all 55 counties statewide to ensure that every West Virginia student who needs internet access to complete remote work is able to do so.

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set aside allocation for a Student Opportunity Learning and Engagement (SOLE) grant for districts to leverage summer programs. More information here.

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • Funds will be allocated to using a formula based on adjusted enrollment counts. This was done to ensure that the greatest percentage of funding is focused on direct services to students. The SEA will support LEA efforts through professional development and technical assistance. The SEA utilizes Technical Assistance Centers (TAC) to increase agency capacity to provide technical assistance in implementation of evidence-based interventions. 
  • Afterschool and Summer Learning funds will be allocated to using a formula based on adjusted enrollment counts. This was done to ensure that the greatest percentage of funding is focused on direct services to students.
  • Reserve funds will be allocated to LEAs using a formula based on adjusted enrollment counts. This was done to ensure that the greatest percentage of funding is focused on direct services to students.

Wisconsin

 

$174,777,774

(ESSER I)

 

$686,056,238

(ESSER II)

 

$1,540,784,854

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

 

$157,299,997 (ESSER I)

 

 

$617,450,614 (ESSER II)

 

 

$1,386,706,369 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction guidance to LEAs

 

 

$17,477,777

(ESSER I)

 

$68,605,624

(ESSER II)

 

$154,078,485

(ESSER III)

ESSER I: The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (WDPI) will collaborate with three strategic state partners to support online, blended, and remote instructional delivery systems. Examples of existing partnerships the department could build upon include:

The Wisconsin Digital Learning Collaborative (WDLC). This is a partnership between WDPI, the Wisconsin Virtual School out of Cooperative Education, Service Agency (CESA) 9, and the eSchools Network, and is Wisconsin’s state-designated web academy. The WDLC partners currently support over 300 schools with online and blended courses. They are well-positioned to increase both leadership capacity for planning around online instruction, and access to online and blended learning courses for students in grades 6-12.

  • The CESA Instructional Technology Network. The Network will help implement local training and leadership planning assistance. The Institute for Personalized Learning (IPL). A division of CESA 1, the Institute assists districts in creating and delivering learner-centered, instructional design principles, and technology-rich learning experiences. The Institute has a wealth of resources to assist schools in creating blended and digitally rich learning experiences.”

ESSER II: The state will use the ESSER II set aside fund for the following:

  • $2.4 million to establish a grant amount of $100,000 for 33 school districts. Funds will be used to ensure every LEA receives a minimum of $100,000 ESSER II allocation.
  • $65 million to any LEA that does not reach a $395 per pupil allocation with either the $100,000 minimum allocation or the Title I formula will be eligible for additional funds. The amount of funding for each of these LEAs will be determined on the total number of in-person instructional hours provided during the entirety of the 2020-21 school year. As a result, instructional designs and closures at any time during the school year may impact the calculation. Department of Public Instruction (DPI) will need to collect information on hours of instruction from eligible LEAs at the conclusion of the school year. The DPI will be unable to calculate amounts for eligible LEAs until the data collection is complete, which may take until the fall.

More information here.

Wyoming

 

$32,562,651

(ESSER I)

 

$135,230,900

(ESSER II)

 

$303,709,391

(ESSER III)

 

 

 

 

$29,306,386 (ESSER I)

 

 

$121,707,810 (ESSER II)

 

 

$273,338,452 (ESSER III)

 

 

The Wyoming Department of Education guidance to LEAs

 

Wyoming ARPA ESSER III Plan

 

 

$3,256,265

(ESSER I)

 

$13,523,090

(ESSER II)

 

$30,370,939

(ESSER III)

"The Wyoming Department of Education will use its set-aside for remote learning by developing new informational and academic resources and expanding awareness of, and access to, best practices and innovations in remote learning for students, families, and educators. The WDE will also explore other potential uses such as PPE and other health products, developing new and enhanced health and safety protocols, credit recovery and remediation, early literacy and math intervention, improving SEL infrastructure, and expansion of LMS capacity."

 

ESSER III: Some highlights include:

  • The full 5% reserve required to address the impact of lost instructional time will be awarded through the implementation of a competitive grant opportunity titled “Addressing Gaps and Accelerated Learning.” The WDE has not chosen specific evidence-based interventions, allowing for LEAs to select appropriate evidence-based interventions tailored to students’ needs.
  • LEAs and community-based organizations in strategic partnerships will be able to apply for competitive grant opportunities to implement or expand evidence-based, afterschool or summer learning programs.