The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

09
 Court Upholds Net Neutrality But Says States Can Write Their Own Rules

The D.C. Circuit upheld most of the Federal Communications Commission’s 2018 order retreating from net neutrality. But the court struck down the portion of the order disallowing states and local governments from adopting measures preempting the order.

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08
Might SCOTUS Split on Sexual Orientation and Transgender Employment Discrimination Cases?

When the lines are long and the protesters loud, predicting the path the Supreme Court might take is a perilous practice. Especially if the justice who voted most in the majority last term—Justice Brett Kavanaugh—is nearly silent.

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08
SCOTUS Hears First Transgender Civil Rights Case

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a case that could potentially determine the employment rights of transgender individuals. The case, R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), is the first transgender civil rights case to be heard by the court.

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07
Supreme Court to Decide Louisiana Abortion Case

The issue the Supreme Court will decide in June Medical Services LLC v. Gee is whether Louisiana’s law requiring physicians performing abortions to have admitting privileges at a local hospital conflicts with Supreme Court precedent.

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14

In New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether New York City’s ban on transporting a handgun to a home or shooting range outside city limits violates the Second Amendment, the Commerce Clause or the constitutional right to travel.

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08
A Term of Change on the Supreme Court

And if you think the last Supreme Court term was big (census, partisan gerrymandering), well, buckle up. 

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02
Registration Open for Supreme Court Webinars

The State and Local Legal Center has organized two webinars to review and dissect the most important U.S. Supreme Court cases for states and local governments. Because of the plethora of cases affecting states and local government two webinars are necessary.  

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02
Supreme Court to Tackle 'Bridgegate' Case

The basic question the U.S. Supreme Court will decide is whether the masterminds of “Bridgegate” committed fraud in violation of federal law. The more technical question is whether a public official “defrauds” the government of its property by advancing a “public policy reason” for an official decision that is not the subjective “real reason” for the decision.

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01
Supreme Court Takes Case Involving State Aid to Religious Schools

If a state-aid program violates a state constitutional prohibition against mixing church and state because religious institutions may participate, does discontinuing that program violate the federal constitution’s free exercise or equal protection clauses?

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01
Supreme Court to Review DACA

In Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California the Supreme Court will decide whether the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is judicially reviewable and lawful. Three lower courts have concluded ending the policy is both reviewable and likely unlawful.  

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.