The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

14

In New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether New York City’s ban on transporting a handgun to a home or shooting range outside city limits violates the Second Amendment, the Commerce Clause or the constitutional right to travel.

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08
A Term of Change on the Supreme Court

And if you think the last Supreme Court term was big (census, partisan gerrymandering), well, buckle up. 

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02
Registration Open for Supreme Court Webinars

The State and Local Legal Center has organized two webinars to review and dissect the most important U.S. Supreme Court cases for states and local governments. Because of the plethora of cases affecting states and local government two webinars are necessary.  

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02
Supreme Court to Tackle 'Bridgegate' Case

The basic question the U.S. Supreme Court will decide is whether the masterminds of “Bridgegate” committed fraud in violation of federal law. The more technical question is whether a public official “defrauds” the government of its property by advancing a “public policy reason” for an official decision that is not the subjective “real reason” for the decision.

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01
Supreme Court Takes Case Involving State Aid to Religious Schools

If a state-aid program violates a state constitutional prohibition against mixing church and state because religious institutions may participate, does discontinuing that program violate the federal constitution’s free exercise or equal protection clauses?

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01
Supreme Court to Review DACA

In Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California the Supreme Court will decide whether the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is judicially reviewable and lawful. Three lower courts have concluded ending the policy is both reviewable and likely unlawful.  

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28
SCOTUS Backs States, OKs Warrantless Blood Draws From Unconscious Drivers

In Mitchell v. Wisconsin the Supreme Court held that generally when police officers have probable cause to believe an unconscious person has committed a drunk driving offense, warrantless blood draws are permissible. The State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) filed an amicus brief arguing for this result.

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27
Supreme Court Holds Partisan Gerrymandering Claims May Not be Litigated

In Rucho v. Common Cause the Supreme Court held 5-4 that partisan gerrymandering claims are non-justiciable—meaning that a federal court cannot decide them.

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27
SCOTUS Rules in Census Case—Ball Now in Secretary Ross’ Court

Chief Justice John Roberts joined his more liberal colleagues (Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Steven Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elise Kagan) in at least stalling the issue of whether the U.S. Census Bureau may include a question about citizenship on the 2020 census, concluding the reasons Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross gave for adding the citizenship question to the 2020 census were pretextual in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act (APA).

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26
SCOTUS Strikes Down Durational-Residency Requirement for Alcohol Sellers

In Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association v. Thomas the Supreme Court held 7-2 that Tennessee’s law requiring alcohol retailers to live in the state for two years to receive a license is unconstitutional.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.