The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

17
SCOTUS: Lower Courts Must Reconsider Limits on Religious Service Attendance in Colorado, New Jersey

The U.S. Supreme Court sent two cases involving limits on religious service attendance back to lower courts to reconsider in light of Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, New York v. Cuomo.

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17
Supreme Court to Hear Challenge to NCAA Pay-to-Play Prohibition

In NCAA. v. Alston and AAC v. Alston the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) eligibility rules which prohibit pay-to-play violate antitrust law. The Ninth Circuit ruled against the NCAA.

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11
Supreme Court Decides Bipartisan Judicial Appointments Case on Standing

In Carney v. Adams the Supreme Court held unanimously that James Adams lacked standing to challenge a Delaware constitutional provision that requires that appointments to Delaware’s major courts reflect a partisan balance.

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08
Supreme Court to Decide Legality of Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirements

In Azar v. Gresham and Arkansas v. Gresham the Supreme Court will decide whether it was lawful for the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services to allow Arkansas to require certain Medicaid recipients to work or look for work.

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30
State and Local Legal Center Argues 'Nominal Damages Only' Lawsuit is Moot

Two Georgia Gwinnett College students sued the college over its Freedom of Expression policy, which only allowed students to engage in expressive activities in two designated areas after getting a permit. They sought an injunction preventing the college from enforcing its policy and nominal damages of $1. The college then changed the policy. 

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30
Supreme Court Prevents New York from Imposing Certain Limits on Attending Religious Services

 In a 5-4 decision in Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, New York v. Cuomo, the Supreme Court has prevented New York Governor Mario Cuomo from enforcing certain restrictions on attendance at religious services due to COVID-19.

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18
Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Significant Land Use Case

The Supreme Court has required governments to pay “just compensation” to property owners where the government “requires an owner to suffer a permanent physical invasion of her property—however minor.” 

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11
Justices Signal the Entire ACA Is Unlikely to Be Overturned

The Supreme Court heard oral argument Tuesday in California v. Texas, a case where it is possible the Supreme Court could rule that a portion of the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional and strike down the entire law if it rules the individual mandate cannot be severed from the rest of the ACA.

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05
Supreme Court Denies Prison Officers Qualified Immunity

In a very brief, unauthored opinion the U.S. Supreme Court denied qualified immunity in Taylor v. Riojas to a number of correctional officers who confined Trent Taylor to a “pair of shockingly unsanitary cells” for six days. The court didn’t hear oral argument in this case, and Justice Amy Coney Barrett didn’t participate in it. 

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29
Supreme Court Clears Way for North Carolina Ballots Received After Election to Be Counted

The Supreme Court left in place a nine-day extension to count absentee ballots in North Carolina. If North Carolina absentee ballots are postmarked on or before election day they may be counted if received up to nine days after the election.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.