The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

28
SCOTUS Rules State Legislatures Can’t Copyright Statutory Annotations

In Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org the Supreme Court held 5-4 that non-binding, explanatory legal materials created by state legislatures cannot be copyrighted.

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27
SCOTUS: Gun Case Is Moot

In a two-page per curiam (unauthored) opinion in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. City of New York, the Supreme Court held that a challenge to New York City’s rule disallowing residents to transport firearms to a second home or shooting range outside of the city is moot.

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27
SCOTUS Takes Middle of the Road Position in Groundwater Clean Water Act Case

In County of Maui, Hawaii v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund the Supreme Court held 6-3 that when there is a “functional equivalent of a direct discharge” from a point source to navigable waters an appropriate permit is required under the Clean Water Act. 

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23
SCOTUS and COVID-19

The U.S> Supreme Court is known for its ceaselessness. Government shutdowns, snowstorms, anthrax and vacancies haven’t slowed down the high court. But it has not been spared by this global pandemic.

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22
SCOTUS:  State Jury Verdicts for Serious Crimes Must Be Unanimous

In a fractured 6-3 opinion in Ramos v. Louisiana the Supreme Court held that for convictions of serious crimes state court jury verdicts must be unanimous.

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21
SCOTUS Rules Against Bringing State Law Claims in Superfund Case

In a 7-2 decision in Atlantic Richfield v. Christian the Supreme Court held that landowners located on a Superfund site who wanted additional remedies beyond the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plan to clean up the site could not sue in state court,

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07
State Wins SCOTUS Revoked License Search Case

In an 8-1 opinion the Supreme Court held that a police officer may initiate a traffic stop after learning the registered owner of the vehicle has a revoked license unless the officer has information negating the inference the owner of the vehicle is the driver. 

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23
States Win SCOTUS Pirate/Sovereign Immunity Copyright Case

In Allen v. Cooper the Supreme Court held unanimously that a state cannot be sued for copyright infringement. In short, the court found that Congress lacked the authority to strip states of their sovereign immunity in the Copyright Remedy Clarification Act of 1990.

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23
SCOTUS: Race Must Be 'But For' Cause in Employment Discrimination Suits

In Comcast v. National Association of African-American Owned Media the Supreme Court held unanimously that a plaintiff who sues under 42 U.S.C. §1981 must plead and prove that race was the but-for cause of his or her injury.

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12
SCOTUS Rules State Identity Theft Statutes Not Preempted in False Social Security Number Prosecutions

In a 5-4 decision in Kansas v. Garcia the Supreme Court held that the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) does not preempt state statutes that provide a basis for identity theft prosecutions when someone uses another person’s Social Security number on their state and federal tax-withholding forms.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.