The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

13
Supreme Court to Decide if Government Policy Changes May Moot a Lawsuit

The question the Supreme Court will decided in Uzuegbunam v. Preczewski is whether the government changing a policy after a lawsuit has been filed renders the case moot if the plaintiff has only asked for nominal damages. 

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
09
 SCOTUS Holds a Sitting President May Be Issued a State Criminal Subpoena

President Donald Trump's tax returns are unlikely to be available to the public soon as a result of two Supreme Court cases.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
09
Supreme Court OKs ACA’s Expanded Contraceptive Mandate Exemptions

In a 7-2 decision in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania the U.S. Supreme Court held that religious employers and employers with moral objections may be exempted from the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) contraceptive mandate.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
08
What Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue Means for States

In a high profile 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last week that the state of Montana cannot exclude religious schools from receiving tax credit-funded scholarships under its school choice program. What do legislators need to know, and what does this decision mean for states?

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
07
Kavanaugh Allows Illinois Governor’s Stay-at-Home Order With Religious Exemption to Stand

Without explanation, without referring the matter to the entire Supreme Court, and without calling for a response, Justice Brett Kavanaugh denied a request for an emergency injunction to strike down Illinois Governor Pritzker’s executive order limiting gatherings to 50 people while exempting religious gathering. 

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
07
SCOTUS Rules States May Sanction Faithless Electors

In Chiafalo v. Washington, the Supreme Court upheld Washington state’s law fining “faithless” electors that do not vote for the candidate that won the state’s popular vote.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
06

Parties can ask the Supreme Court on an emergency basis to reverse a lower court’s preliminary ruling. When the court “stays” or “refuses to stay” a lower court order it isn’t ruling on the merits of the case.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
06
 Four Supreme Court Justices Question First Amendment Precedent Problematic for States and Local Governments

In Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants the Supreme Court held 6-3 that the Telephone Consumer Protection Act’s (TCPA) debt-collection exception was content-based, failed strict scrutiny, and therefore violated the First Amendment.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
01
SCOTUS Rules U.S. Constitution Overrides State Constitution in Religious School Aid Case

In Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, the Supreme Court held 5-4 that the U.S. Constitution’s Free Exercise Clause allows families to receive tax-credit funded scholarships to attend religious schools regardless of the Montana Constitution’s no-aid to sectarian schools provision.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
30
SCOTUS Strikes Down Louisiana Abortion Law

In a 5-4 decision in June Medical Services v. Russo the Supreme Court struck down Louisiana’s admitting privileges law. Five justices agreed that Louisiana’s law created an unconstitutional “substantial obstacle” to women obtaining abortions.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
Page 1 of 34First   Previous   [1]  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next   Last   

Subscribe to the NCSL Blog

Click on the RSS feed at left to add the NCSL Blog to your favorite RSS reader. 

About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.