The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

16
Robocall Case Has Important Implications for State, Local Governments

The question the Supreme Court will decide in this case is whether allowing robocalls for government-debt only violates the First Amendment. State and local governments aren’t likely recipients of such calls. 

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14
Supreme Court Accepts ERISA Preemption Case Affecting Majority of States

In Rutledge v. Pharmaceutical Care Management Association, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether states’ attempts to regulate pharmacy benefit managers’ (PBMs) drug-reimbursement rates are preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

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14
U.S. Supreme Court to Try Again to Decide Oklahoma Tribal Issue

The question the U.S. Supreme Court will decide in McGirt v. Oklahoma may sound familiar: “whether the prosecution of an enrolled member of the Creek Tribe for crimes committed within the historical Creek boundaries is subject to exclusive federal jurisdiction.”

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13
SCOTUS to Decide Bankruptcy Case Affecting Local Governments and Two States

The U.S. Supreme Court will decide in City of Chicago, Illinois v. Fulton whether a local government must return a vehicle impounded because of code violations immediately upon a debtor filing for bankruptcy. 

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28
SCOTUS Will Hear Case Regarding Governors’ Authority to Appoint Judges

Delaware’s Constitution requires that three state courts be balanced between the two major political parties. The main question before the U.S. Supreme Court in Carney v. Adams is whether this scheme violates the First Amendment. 

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27
Supreme Court to Decide Excessive Force Case

The U.S. Supreme Court has held that excessive force violates the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against “unreasonable searches and seizures.” The question in Torres v. Madrid is whether police have “seized” someone who they have used force against who has gotten away.   

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19
Significant Homeless Decision Stands at SCOTUS

In Martin v. City of Boise the 9th Circuit held that if a homeless person has no option of sleeping indoors a city cannot cite him or her for violating an ordinance disallowing sleeping outside in a public space. This significant holding is now final.  

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18
SCOTUS Tackles Hot-Button Issues This Term

Blazing-button social issues of abortion, immigration, guns and sexual identity are all on the Supreme Court’s docket this term and, says NCSL’s Supreme Court expert Lisa Soronen, it’s no coincidence they all came up at the same time.

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02
Supreme Court Focuses on Mootness in Gun Case

If you went to the Supreme Court today to check on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s health, you were in luck. She asked the very first question (and many after) in oral argument in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York.

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26
SCOTUS Warns Too Low State Law Campaign Contribution Limits May be Unconstitutional

Following Thompson v. Hebdon, states with low individual-to-candidate or individual-to-group campaign contribution limits may want to review their constitutionality. 

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.