The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

14
SCOTUS Redlights Vaccine-or-Test Rule, Greenlights Vaccine in Medicare/Medicaid Facilities Rule

In National Federation of Independent Businesses v. Department of Labor the U.S. Supreme Court temporarily disallowed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) emergency rule, which requires those who work for employers with more than 100 employees to be vaccinated.

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15
SCOTUS Allows New York State’s Vaccine Mandate Without a Religious Exemption to Stay in Effect

New York requires all health care workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19 and includes no religious exemption.

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13

Texas’s S.B. 8 prohibits abortion after approximately six weeks in contradiction with Roe v. Wade (1973). The question in Whole Woman’s Health v. Jackson was whether abortion providers can sue any state government officials in federal court before the law went into effect.

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10
SCOTUS To Decide State Legislature Lawsuit Intervention Case

In Berger v. North Carolina State Conference of the NAACP the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the North Carolina legislature has a right to intervene in a lawsuit to defend North Carolina’s voter ID law when the North Carolina attorney general is already defending the law.

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30
SLLC Files Supreme Court Brief in Medicaid Cost-Recovery Case

In Gallardo v. Marstiller the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the federal Medicaid Act allows a state Medicaid program to recover reimbursement for Medicaid’s payment of a beneficiary’s past medical expenses by taking funds from the beneficiary’s tort recovery that compensate for future medical expenses.

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16
Supreme Court To Decide Medicare Dialysis Case

As is often true in cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, the legal issues in Marietta Memorial Hospital Employee Health Benefit Plan v. DaVita are numerous and complicated. But the bottom line is relatively simple. In this case the Court will decide whether private health insurance plans may treat dialysis coverage less favorably than other plan benefits.

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09
Supreme Court to Decide if States May Defend Federal Rules the United States Won’t Defend

In Arizona v. San Francisco City and County of California the Supreme Court will decide whether states with interests should be permitted to intervene to defend a rule when the United States ceases to defend the rule.

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08
SCOTUS to Hear Major Climate Change Case

In West Virginia v. EPA, the U.S. Supreme Court will examine the scope of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to regulate the emission of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) from power plants.

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26
Supreme Court To Decide Whether and How Texas and State Officials May Be Sued Over Abortion Law

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument on Nov. 1 in two cases challenging Texas’s abortion law. S.B. 8, enacted earlier this year, prohibits abortions in Texas after approximately six weeks. It allows private citizens to sue a person who provides an abortion in violation of S.B. 8 or “aids or abets” an abortion.

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21
Justice Breyer Allows Maine Vaccine Requirement to Stand

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer rejected a challenge to Maine’s requirement that all healthcare workers be vaccinated against COVID-19.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.