The NCSL Blog

U.S. Supreme Court

04
SCOTUS to Decide if Puerto Rico Residents are Eligible for SSI

In United States v. Vaello-Madero the Supreme Court will decide whether Congress violated the constitution by failing to extend Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to Puerto Rico

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25
Supreme Court to Hear Immigrant Public Charge Case

In Department of Homeland Security v. New York the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the Trump administration’s “public charge” definition violates the Immigration and Nationality Act or is arbitrary and capricious under the Administrative Procedures Act.

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08
Supreme Court Strikes Down California’s Ban on Indoor Religious Services

A divided U.S. Supreme Court struck down California’s “Tier 1” total ban on indoor religious services, while allowing a 25% capacity limitation. Most of the state is currently under Tier 1 COVID-19 restrictions. It also allowed California to continue banning singing and chanting during indoor services.

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03
SCOTUS to Decide Whether Private Party May Exercise Eminent Domain Over State Land

In PennEast Pipeline Co. v. New Jersey the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether a private natural gas company may use the federal government’s eminent-domain power to condemn state land.

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12
Supreme Court to Decide Case Challenging Nonprofit Donor Disclosure State Law

In Americans for Prosperity v. Becerra and Thomas More Law Center v. Becerra the petitioners claim that a California law requiring them to submit to the California attorney general their IRS Form 990 Schedule B, which lists their largest donors, violates the First Amendment.

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04
NCSL Joins SLLC's Supreme Court Amicus Brief Defending State Court Jurisdiction

The issue in B.P. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore is whether a federal appellate court may review all the grounds a defendant alleges supporting hearing its case in federal court even though only one of the grounds is specifically listed in federal statute as a basis for federal appellate court review.

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21
SCOTUS Won’t Stop Trump Plan to Exclude Unauthorized Persons From Apportionment

In an unauthored opinion in Trump v. New York, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to decide whether President DonaldTrump could lawfully and constitutionally direct the secretary of commerce to provide information to him about the number of undocumented persons so he could exclude them from the census apportionment base. As a result, Trump’s memorandum to this effect stands.

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17
SCOTUS: Lower Courts Must Reconsider Limits on Religious Service Attendance in Colorado, New Jersey

The U.S. Supreme Court sent two cases involving limits on religious service attendance back to lower courts to reconsider in light of Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, New York v. Cuomo.

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17
Supreme Court to Hear Challenge to NCAA Pay-to-Play Prohibition

In NCAA. v. Alston and AAC v. Alston the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) eligibility rules which prohibit pay-to-play violate antitrust law. The Ninth Circuit ruled against the NCAA.

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11
Supreme Court Decides Bipartisan Judicial Appointments Case on Standing

In Carney v. Adams the Supreme Court held unanimously that James Adams lacked standing to challenge a Delaware constitutional provision that requires that appointments to Delaware’s major courts reflect a partisan balance.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.