The NCSL Blog

State-Federal Relations

03
Opinion: Notion of 'Unnecessary' Aid to State and Local Governments a 'Myth'

The argument that states and local governments don't  need the $350 billion aid proposed in the $1.9 stimulus bill soon to get a vote in the Senate is misguided, according to an opinion piece in Governing magazine.

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01
FEMA Declares Emergency for all of Texas in Severe Winter Storm

President Joe Biden approved an emergency declaration last week for the entire state of Texas following widespread power outages and cascading system failures from a severe winter storm that continues to overwhelm the area in record low temperatures.

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01

Alejandro Mayorkas, the new Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the creation of eight grant programs totaling $1.87 billion. Their purpose? To “assist our state and local partners in building and sustain capabilities to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism and other disasters.”

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10
House Proposes $350 Billion CRF Replenishment; Permits Revenue Replacement

Nine months after the last significant tranche of coronavirus relief aid was provided to states in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), the House proposed a new $350 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Tuesday night that would permit state revenue replacement in addition to other COVID-related expenses.

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02
Biden Announces Retroactive Waiver of State Cost Share for COVID-19 FEMA Assistance

After nearly a year since President Donald Trump declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, President Joe Biden signed a presidential memorandum that directs the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide emergency COVID-19 assistance under the declaration at 100% federal cost share.

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18
Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Significant Land Use Case

The Supreme Court has required governments to pay “just compensation” to property owners where the government “requires an owner to suffer a permanent physical invasion of her property—however minor.” 

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14
Child Care Bills Pass the House With Bipartisan Support

In a rare showing of bipartisanship, the House passed two bills on July 29—the Child Care Is Essential Act (HR 7027) and the Child Care for Economic Recovery Act (HR 7327).

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14
Congress Takes Another Look at the Rights of College Athletes

In September 2019, California passed legislation allowing college athletes to receive compensation for the use of their names images and likenesses beginning in 2023, launching a debate about what rights student-athletes have and the rules the National Collegiate Athletic Association has had in place for decades.

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05
NCSL’s ‘Relief and Revenue’ Series Highlights Need for Flexible Relief Funding

Congress allocated $150 billion to states, territories, local governments and tribes with the passage of the CARES Act but restrictions on the money has hamstrung some state efforts. Negotiations on the next round of stimulus are underway in Washington and both direct aid to states and greater flexibility in how states can spend the aid are key and contentious issues.

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11

Amplifying NCSL’s already vociferous efforts to secure additional direct and flexible funding for states, NCSL hosted its first virtual briefing for Senate congressional staff as senators consider the next phase of federal response.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.