The NCSL Blog

23
Voting While Homeless? You Bet

In 2020, the population of people experiencing homelessness in the United States was 580,466, according to the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Generally, about a third of this group is likely to be registered but just 10% actually vote.

Continue >

Category: NCSL, Elections
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
18
NCSL Meeting Tackles Early Education Challenges

The challenges facing the early education workforce and potential policy options to support early learning teachers and programs were the focus of a meeting hosted by NCSL’s Education team in June.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
13
SEED Collaborative Examines Policies for Inclusive Pandemic Recovery

In November 2020, the State Exchange on Employment & Disability (SEED) created the COVID-19 Policy Collaborative for an Inclusive Recovery to address the effects of the pandemic on employment for people with disabilities. This ccollaborative was composed of SEED’s partners, along with other key stakeholders and subject matter experts. 

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
05
Census Redistricting Data Arrives A Little Bit Early

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that detailed data from the 2020 decennial census (aka P.L. 94-171 redistricting file, aka “the redistricting data”) will arrive on Aug. 12 at 1 p.m. ET. This comes as surprising news as the U.S. Census Bureau had promised it by Aug. 16.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
04
Veering to Virtual Care: NCSL’s New Telehealth Toolkit for State Legislators

Whether it was attending Zoom University or living that work-from-home life, COVID-19 led a lot of us to go about our day-to-day lives remotely. This, of course, is also true for many patients who sought out health care—and the providers who delivered those services—during the pandemic.

Continue >

Category: Health, COVID-19
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
04
States Turn to Medicaid to Support Behavioral Health Needs Due to COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic and associated trauma, isolation and economic insecurity exacerbated existing behavioral health problems and created new ones.

Continue >

Category: Health, COVID-19
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
04
Certified Community Behavioral Health Centers: Increase Access, Decreasing Costs

Access to quality behavioral health care has long been a priority for many legislators. Using quality health research and data helps legislators create evidence-informed policies

Continue >

Category: Health
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
04
A Real Racket: Combatting Illegal Gambling Machines

Many state legislatures across the country introduced legislation during their 2021 legislative sessions that would strengthen laws designed to combat illegal gambling machines—machines that are not licensed by gaming authorities, not regulated to ensure consumers get a fair shake, and do not provide any tax revenue to state governments.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
30
Census Bureau Announces Traditional Redistricting Data Not Recommended for Use This Decade

The Census Bureau released a blog yesterday describing what the redistricting data will look like when it is released in three weeks. It will reflect the demographic changes and shifts that normally occur every 10 years, but it will also show the effects of the COVID pandemic and differential privacy.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
28
Policy Options To Improve Access to and Uptake of Vaccines: New Resources

Vaccines are a safe and effective public health tool that are key to keeping communities healthy. Nonetheless, they can also be a challenging policy issue in state legislatures.

Continue >

Category: Health
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
Page 9 of 295First   Previous   4  5  6  7  8  [9]  10  11  12  13  Next   Last   

Subscribe to the NCSL Blog

Click on the RSS feed at left to add the NCSL Blog to your favorite RSS reader. 

About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.