The NCSL Blog

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Capitol Forum Session Focuses on Federal and State Disaster Costs

Sharing the cost of disasters between federal and state agencies—and some steps to reduce those costs—were examined during a session on “Sharing the Cost of Disasters: State and Federal Spending” at the NCSL annual Capitol Forum.

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19
Federal Health Agencies Explore Myriad Issues

Over the past few months HHS, CMS, the FDA and the CDC have been working on a number of policies through proposed and draft rules, published final rules and guidance sent to the states.

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19
Significant Homeless Decision Stands at SCOTUS

In Martin v. City of Boise the 9th Circuit held that if a homeless person has no option of sleeping indoors a city cannot cite him or her for violating an ordinance disallowing sleeping outside in a public space. This significant holding is now final.  

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19
The Future of the Electoral College

A panel during last week's NCSL Capitol Forum discussed the merits of keeping the Electoral College versus replacing it with a national popular vote.

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19
Examining the Issues Behind College Student Athlete Compensation

California’s passage of  Fair Pay to Play legislation in September has launched the issue of allowing student athletes to receive compensation for their name, image and likeness to the forefront of consideration for the upcoming 2020 session.

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18
SCOTUS Tackles Hot-Button Issues This Term

Blazing-button social issues of abortion, immigration, guns and sexual identity are all on the Supreme Court’s docket this term and, says NCSL’s Supreme Court expert Lisa Soronen, it’s no coincidence they all came up at the same time.

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18
The Future of Campaign Ads—and Regulation—Is Digital

Twitter has banned political ads. Some say Facebook, Google and others should do the same. But according to Colin Delany, an online communications consultant, “even if Facebook got rid of digital advertising, there would still be digital ads.”

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18

America’s rural hospitals are ailing; undernourished and underpaid, squeezed by a population that is older, poorer, less insured and sicker than the nation at large. And closing at a rate that alarms health officials, who are witnessing the emptying of the health infrastructure for a wide swath of rural America.

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17
Increasing Collaboration Between Police and Mental Health Professionals

Law enforcement agencies and state lawmakers have been working to improve law enforcement responses and develop alternatives. Recent legislation has required or funded CIT training, authorized and funded crisis triage centers, and otherwise supported law enforcement efforts to deflect individuals with mental health needs away from criminal justice system involvement.

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16
Pros and Cons of Allowing Guns in Schools

Should guns be carried in schools? And if so, by whom? Teachers? Police officers? School resource officers? Should they be trained as police or school employees? Should urban/suburban schools be treated the same as far-flung rural districts? How do you deal with cultural and racial sensitivities? Should school districts have their own police departments?

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.