The NCSL Blog

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NCSL Participates in the Safety and Justice Challenge’s Moving Forward Together Virtual Network Meeting

Participants in the Safety and Justice Challenge’s Moving Forward Together virtual network meeting June 30 discussed how recent state legislative actions and trends demonstrates legislative interest and momentum in the direction of local justice and jail reform.

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30
State Banking Authority Wins in Repeal of “True Lender” Rule

States will keep regulatory control over certain loans after the U.S. House of Representatives followed the Senate last week in repealing a regulatory rule that would have allowed financial technology lenders to partner with banks and ultimately avoid state banking laws.

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NCSL Co-Hosts Child Care Stabilization Grants Federal Briefing with the Administration

Top officials from the Administration of Children and Families virtually briefed an audience of governors, state legislators, legislative staff and county officials about ACF’s recently released Child Care Stabilization Grants guidance.

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30
Supreme Court Rules Against States’ Rights in Pipeline Case

In PennEast Pipeline v. New Jersey the U.S. Supreme Court held 5-4 that the federal government may constitutionally grant pipeline companies the authority to condemn necessary rights-of-way in which a state has an interest. Pipeline companies likewise may sue states to obtain the rights-of-way.

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28
Supreme Court to Decide First Amendment Billboard Case

The city of Austin, Texas, allows on-premises billboards to be digitized but not off-premises billboards. In City of Austin, Texas v. Reagan National Advertising of Texas Inc. two outdoor advertising companies claim that this distinction is “content-based” under the First Amendment.

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In a per curiam (unauthored) opinion in Lombardo v. City of St. Louis, Missouri the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the Eighth Circuit to decide again whether police officers used excessive force when restraining Nicholas Gilbert on his stomach for 15-minutes and/or should receive qualified immunity.

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28
Redistricting Is Way Behind Last Decade

After last year’s floods, fires, and of course, a pandemic, the U.S. Census Bureau redistricting data is scheduled to be almost five months late.

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24
SCOTUS Adopts Case-by-Case Approach to Warrantless Pursuit of Fleeing Misdemeanants Into Home

In Lange v. California, the U.S. Supreme Court held that pursuit of a fleeing misdemeanor suspect does not always justify entry into a home without a warrant.

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23
Cheerleader Wins SCOTUS Off-Campus Free Speech Case

In Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L., the U.S. Supreme Court held 8-1 that a public school could not discipline a student who transmitted to her Snapchat friends, outside of school hours and away from the school’s campus, vulgar language and gestures criticizing the school and the school’s cheerleading team. 

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23
Results of Supreme Court Takings Case Mixed for States and Local Governments

In Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid, the Supreme Court held 6-3 that a California regulation allowing union organizers access to agriculture employers’ property to solicit support for unionization up to three hours a day, 120 days a year is a per se physical taking under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. 

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.