The NCSL Blog

03
NCSL Launches Emergency Medical Services Legislative Database

In recent years, EMS has played an increasingly important role in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and preventing drug overdoses. States have taken several legislative actions to ensure that residents have access to life-saving EMS.

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Category: Health
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03
May States Prosecute Non-Indians Who Commit Crimes Against Indians in Indian Country?

In Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether a state has authority to prosecute non-Indians who commit crimes against Indians in Indian country.

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31
Word of the Year is 'Flexibility' for Legislative Sessions

Sesame Street used to do a segment called “The Word of the Day” where Elmo, along with a celebrity, taught kids a new word and what it means. Well, since the beginning of the pandemic, the word of everyday for state legislatures has been “flexibility.”

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28
Back to Business: Legislative Sessions Update

By the start of February, 38 states, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the District of Columbia Council will have convened their 2022 regular sessions. Minnesota will be the last legislature to convene this month, on Monday.

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Category: Legislators
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28
Legislative Librarians Make it Onto the Shelves

Alex Burnett and Jessica Lundgren, senior librarians with the Maine Law and Legislative Reference Library, noticed a glaring omission when reviewing a proposed table of contents for an upcoming book on law librarianship.

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26
What Will Justice Breyer’s Retirement Mean for States and Local Governments

Aside from his delicious pot roast recipe and not retiring immediately after President Biden’s election despite unrelenting pressure, Justice Stephen Breyer will be remembered as a reliable liberal in the court’s big, controversial cases, for his pragmatic worldview, and for his inquisitive, tireless, and at times dramatic persona at oral argument.

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26

In Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard and Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether to overturn Grutter v. Bollinger, in which the Supreme Court held that institutions of higher education may rely on a narrowly tailored use of race in admissions decisions to further the compelling interest of achieving a diverse student body without violating the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause or Title VI (which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin in programs receiving federal financial assistance).

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25

In Sackett v. EPA the U.S. Supreme Court will decide the proper test for determining when “wetlands” are “waters of the United States.” This test has long remained unclear because Justice Scalia and Justice Kennedy offered competing definitions in Rapanos v. United States (2006).

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24
Detailing Significant Trends in Law Enforcement Legislation

The murder of George Floyd in May 2020 and the nationwide focus on law enforcement policy that followed kicked off an unprecedented state legislative response. Over the next year, more than 3,000 bills were considered across all 50 states and Washington, D.C., with most states enacting significant legislation.

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19
Supreme Court To Decide Whether Failure to Mirandize Means Money Damages

The question in Vega v. Tekoh is whether a police officer can be sued for money damages for failing to provide a Miranda warning.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.