The NCSL Blog

14
Revisiting Kentucky’s Juvenile Justice Reforms

New data shows a big impact on Kentucky’s juvenile justice system arising from the state’s passage of comprehensive juvenile justice reform legislation in 2014.

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14
Supreme Court Allows Census Count to Stop

The Supreme Court has frozen in place a district court order requiring the Census Bureau to continue counting people through Oct. 31. As a result, the Census Bureau may immediately stop the count. 

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13
Justice Breyer Allows Ranked-Choice Voting to Proceed in Maine

In the Supreme Court’s first non-COVID-19 related emergency case regarding a state election requirement relevant to the 2020 presidential election, Justice Stephen Breyer refused to overturn a state court decision which allows Maine to use ranked-choice voting. 

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13
States Work to Reduce the Number of People With Mental Illness Who Become Justice-Involved

Individuals with mental illness are often arrested for behavior associated with their disability, including administrative offenses and non-violent “qualify of life” offenses. For those in the midst of a mental health crisis, the criminal justice system and jail are all too often the first or only available response—but not necessarily the best.

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12
Bootcamp Addresses Family First, Other Child Welfare Topics

More than 40 state legislators and legislative staff took part in NCSL’s Family First Boot Camp in August.

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12
By the Numbers: Election and Redistricting Ballot Measure Trends

This summer, I often heard that both the number of elections and redistricting ballot measures were higher this year compared to years past, and I wondered if the two increased together or if 2020 was unique. With my background in computer science and data analysis, I decided to put this to the test.

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12
State Elections 2020: Health Ballot Measures

Contemplating which state and national officials to elect during a pandemic, voters in at least nine states face another choice—the opportunity to weigh in on their state’s health policy.

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09
What Might a Justice Barrett Mean for States and Local Governments?

The confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett begin on Monday. She undoubtably will be asked about her views on the Affordable Care Act, guns, and abortion. Like her predecessors, she will try to say as little as possible about her views on hot button issues. But what about her thoughts on less controversial topics the Supreme Court decides on a more regular basis, upon which states and local governments may have more agreement like land use, qualified immunity, and free speech?

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09
Experts Prepare for Healthy Election Day—Read More in the October Canvass

During this pandemic, we hear a lot of talk about healthy people, healthy practices, even healthy democracy. So what about healthy elections?

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Category: Elections
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08
U.S. Supreme Court Overturns Judge-Made Change to South Carolina Absentee Voting Requirement

In Andino v. Middleton the Supreme Court has continued its trend of striking down judge-made changes to state election laws in response to COVID-19.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.