The NCSL Blog

19
U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021 Introduced in the House and Senate

The bill features an eight-year path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. as of Jan. 1. It would apply to an estimated 11 million people, allowing them to live and work in the U.S. for five years following background checks and tax payments.

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Category: Immigration
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18
Advisory Group Tackles Health Disparities and Health Equity

As the coronavirus continues to shine a light on longstanding health disparities, NCSL convened a new bipartisan advisory group to provide guidance on how NCSL can best support legislators and legislative staff as they address health disparities and health equity issues in their states.

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Category: Health, COVID-19
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17
Breaking Down Barriers | Maryland Speaker Adrienne A. Jones

Maryland Speaker Adrienne A. Jones (D) welcomed us into her living room for an NCSL Living Room Town Hall virtual interview on the significance of being the first Black and first female speaker in “the Free State.”

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Category: Legislators, NCSL
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15
New Podcast: State Innovations to Manage High Cost of Gene Therapies

Some gene therapies “are approaching several million dollars and those costs are felt across the health care system, particularly for Medicaid and state employee plans,” said Colleen Becker, a sernior policy specialist in NCSL's Health Program, during a recent installment of NCSL’s “Our American States” podcast.

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10
House Proposes $350 Billion CRF Replenishment; Permits Revenue Replacement

Nine months after the last significant tranche of coronavirus relief aid was provided to states in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), the House proposed a new $350 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Tuesday night that would permit state revenue replacement in addition to other COVID-related expenses.

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09
How Elections Have Changed Since 2000—Read More in the February Canvass

“The biggest change since 2000 is that voting has gotten more convenient for, and fairer to, voters thanks to reforms to every part of the process,” says Doug Chapin, director of election research at Fors Marsh Group.

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Category: Elections
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09
How Lawmakers Are Confronting COVID-19 College Challenges

After a 2020 session disrupted by COVID-19, lawmakers across the country return to statehouses to continue responding to the pandemic. One issue legislators will address will be the myriad challenges facing colleges and students pursuing a postsecondary degree or credential.  

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08
Supreme Court Strikes Down California’s Ban on Indoor Religious Services

A divided U.S. Supreme Court struck down California’s “Tier 1” total ban on indoor religious services, while allowing a 25% capacity limitation. Most of the state is currently under Tier 1 COVID-19 restrictions. It also allowed California to continue banning singing and chanting during indoor services.

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05
How Native American Communities Are Handled for Redistricting

Inquiring minds want to know: how are Native American communities handled for redistricting purposes?

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03
SCOTUS to Decide Whether Private Party May Exercise Eminent Domain Over State Land

In PennEast Pipeline Co. v. New Jersey the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether a private natural gas company may use the federal government’s eminent-domain power to condemn state land.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.