The NCSL Blog

17
Supreme Court to Hear Challenge to NCAA Pay-to-Play Prohibition

In NCAA. v. Alston and AAC v. Alston the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) eligibility rules which prohibit pay-to-play violate antitrust law. The Ninth Circuit ruled against the NCAA.

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11
SCOTUS Rules States May Regulate Pharmacy Benefit Managers’ Prescription Drug Reimbursement Rates

By Lisa Soronen

In a unanimous decision the U.S. Supreme Court held in Rutledge v. Pharmaceutical Care Management Association that states may regulate the price at which pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) reimburse pharmacies for the cost of prescription drugs without violating the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

 

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Category: Health
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11
Supreme Court Decides Bipartisan Judicial Appointments Case on Standing

In Carney v. Adams the Supreme Court held unanimously that James Adams lacked standing to challenge a Delaware constitutional provision that requires that appointments to Delaware’s major courts reflect a partisan balance.

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10
New Afterschool Report Shows Both Demand and Barriers to Access Have Grown

What are parents’ opinions of afterschool programs? Afterschool Alliance recently released its 2020 America After 3PM report answering this important question.

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09
States' Control Over Graduate Student Unions

Hawaiian state legislators have introduced legislation to allow graduate students to unionize at the University of Hawaii (UH) several times since 2012, but every attempt has failed—most recently in 2019. Why? 

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08
Childhood Vaccination Rates Remain Low Amid Pandemic

Vaccination rates for Medicaid beneficiaries under age 2 were nearly 22% lower between March and May than the same period last year, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Michigan, for example, reported an over 20% decrease in the rate of non-flu routine vaccines administered to children 18 years and younger since the state’s stay-at-home order was implemented on March 23.

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Category: Health, COVID-19
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08
Supreme Court to Decide Legality of Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirements

In Azar v. Gresham and Arkansas v. Gresham the Supreme Court will decide whether it was lawful for the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services to allow Arkansas to require certain Medicaid recipients to work or look for work.

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30
State and Local Legal Center Argues 'Nominal Damages Only' Lawsuit is Moot

Two Georgia Gwinnett College students sued the college over its Freedom of Expression policy, which only allowed students to engage in expressive activities in two designated areas after getting a permit. They sought an injunction preventing the college from enforcing its policy and nominal damages of $1. The college then changed the policy. 

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30
Supreme Court Prevents New York from Imposing Certain Limits on Attending Religious Services

 In a 5-4 decision in Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, New York v. Cuomo, the Supreme Court has prevented New York Governor Mario Cuomo from enforcing certain restrictions on attendance at religious services due to COVID-19.

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23
Alaskans Approve Sweeping Election Changes

Election results might be old news in most states, but in Alaska, it’s still breaking news.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.