The NCSL Blog

06
Presidential Primaries and More in the December Canvass

With less than two months between now and the Iowa caucuses, politics dominates nearly every conversation about presidential primaries. But the process for choosing presidential candidates matters, too, which is why this month’s Canvass—the NCSL election administration newsletter—provides an extensive report on how state political parties are handling their states’ 2020 presidential primaries.

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Category: Elections
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05
Congress Looking to States for Best Procedural Practices

What can Congress learn from the states? Quite a bit actually. In fact, The Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress was established to learn how to make Congress work better for the American people.

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05
Tools for Engaging Your Community: PSAs for Census 2020

An accurate census count will determine billions of dollars of federal funding and the number of congressional seats for each state—but how can legislators ensure that community members are aware of and participate in the 2020 Census?

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Category: Census
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04
Extra, Extra! Read All About It: 'Red Book' Is Out!

Do you know what “one person, one vote” is? What about “legislative privilege”? If you are a legislator or legislative staff member, the answers to these questions are essential because the once-in-a-decade process of redistricting is not far away—and your state is in the midst of preparations now.

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03
Maryland’s 911 System Goes Modern

The U.S. 911 system receives over 240 million calls each year according to the National Emergency Number Association, at least 80% from wireless devices. The 911 system celebrated its 50th anniversary last year, but the technology used in most states is outdated and inefficient.

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Category: Transportation
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02
Supreme Court Focuses on Mootness in Gun Case

If you went to the Supreme Court today to check on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s health, you were in luck. She asked the very first question (and many after) in oral argument in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York.

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26
SCOTUS Warns Too Low State Law Campaign Contribution Limits May be Unconstitutional

Following Thompson v. Hebdon, states with low individual-to-candidate or individual-to-group campaign contribution limits may want to review their constitutionality. 

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22
Report: Census Data Key to $1.5 Trillion in Federal Spending

The report examines the magnitude the federal government relies on census data to direct the distribution of federal funding to the states. The federal funds are determined with formulas based on census counts and census data.

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Category: Census
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22
What's New From Children and Families | November 2019

In 2018, more than 286,000 U.S. families received voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for a grand total of 3.2 million home visits. Learn more about home visiting at the National Home Visiting Resource Center and their just released Home Visiting Yearbook.

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Category: Human services
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22

Our goal is to provide you the tools you need to stay informed and do your jobs better. If you’re interested in additional training, connect with one of our professional staff associations to learn more about opportunities to learn with your peers.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.