The NCSL Blog

Census

05
Census Redistricting Data Arrives A Little Bit Early

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that detailed data from the 2020 decennial census (aka P.L. 94-171 redistricting file, aka “the redistricting data”) will arrive on Aug. 12 at 1 p.m. ET. This comes as surprising news as the U.S. Census Bureau had promised it by Aug. 16.

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27
Lawmakers Weigh In on Census Data

Yesterday's long-awaited news from the U.S. Census Bureau about which states gained and lost congressional seats drew quick responses from state lawmakers.

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Category: Census, COVID-19
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12
SLLC Files SCOTUS Amicus Brief in State Sovereignty Pipeline Case

In a U.S. Supreme Court amicus brief filed in PennEast Pipeline Co. v. New Jersey the State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) argues that the Natural Gas Act doesn’t allow private parties to condemn state land.

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Category: Census
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24
The Census Bureau, Differential Privacy and the Courts

Right now—the second half of March—is when redistricting data should have been arriving in states, with the last delivery to be no later than April 1 as required by federal law. That’s not what’s happening, owing to delays in field operations for the census last year and more.

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Category: Census
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05
How Native American Communities Are Handled for Redistricting

Inquiring minds want to know: how are Native American communities handled for redistricting purposes?

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27
Census Apportionment Delayed Until End of April

Politicos have been waiting, waiting, waiting … to know how many seats each state will have in the U.S. House for the next 10 years. We don’t have the answer for you, but we now know when we will know: by the end of April.

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census, redistricting
Category: Census, COVID-19
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21
SCOTUS Won’t Stop Trump Plan to Exclude Unauthorized Persons From Apportionment

In an unauthored opinion in Trump v. New York, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to decide whether President DonaldTrump could lawfully and constitutionally direct the secretary of commerce to provide information to him about the number of undocumented persons so he could exclude them from the census apportionment base. As a result, Trump’s memorandum to this effect stands.

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19
Supreme Court to Decide if Census Results May Exclude Undocumented Persons

On Nov. 30, one month before the secretary of commerce is supposed to report to the president the results of the census, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument in New York v. Trump. In this case, a three-judge panel ruled that the secretary of commerce may not provide the president with a census count that excludes undocumented persons. The state-by-state population breakdown the secretary of commerce provides to the president is used to apportion seats to the House of Representatives.

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14
Supreme Court Allows Census Count to Stop

The Supreme Court has frozen in place a district court order requiring the Census Bureau to continue counting people through Oct. 31. As a result, the Census Bureau may immediately stop the count. 

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15
The Census is Hot, Hot, Hot!

When I think back to January when the Census Bureau officially kicked off the 2020 census in Alaska, who would have thought the census would continue to be such a hot topic in September? I didn’t.

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Category: Census, COVID-19
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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.