The NCSL Blog

Entries for June 2020

22
Legislators Bear the Torch of Democracy

State legislators fight for issues, represent their communities and commit their time to preserve and strengthen our democracy. That’s hard work. And in these strange and tumultuous times, legislating may feel harder than ever.

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19
House, Senate, White House Consider Police Reform in Wake of Protests

Days of protests across the nation following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody have drawn swift and ongoing responses on the federal level. Police reform legislation has been introduced in the House and Senate in recent weeks, while President Donald Trump signed an executive order on policing on June 16.

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18
Webinar June 24: Using the Federal Child Nutrition Programs to Respond to COVID-19

With the coronavirus pandemic upending many aspects of normal life, leaving parents and caregivers unemployed and schools shuttered, federal child nutrition programs are adapting to meet the needs of America’s families.

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18
Supreme Court Allows DACA to Continue

In a 5-4 decision in DHS v. Regents of the University of California, the Supreme Court held that the decision to wind-down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program violated the Administrative Procedures Act.

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18
Do You Want Your State’s Details on Absentee/Mail Voting?

Have you followed the news about elections lately? If so, probably 1/3 has been about the horseraces, and 2/3 has been about election administration, a complete reversal of the usual status at this point in a general election year.

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17
Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Qualified Immunity and Gun Cases

On Monday the Supreme Court denied nine petitions involving qualified immunity and 10 petitions involving guns. Had the Court accepted any of these petitions the case would have had significant implications for states and local governments.  

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17

The doctrine of qualified immunity protects state and local officials from individual liability unless the official violated a clearly established constitutional right. Some of the police reform bills Congress is considering eliminate qualified immunity for state and local police and correctional officers.

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17
NCSL Launches Tracking Database for Legislative Responses for Policing

Using NCSL’s new Legislative Responses for Policing State Bill Tracking Database you can track bills as they progress through state legislatures across the US and keep track of new proposals.

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17
Supreme Court Finds Ineffective Assistance of Counsel in Capital Case

In Andrus v. Texas, the Supreme Court held 6-3 in an unauthored opinion that defense counsel was unconstitutionally ineffective in representing Terrance Andrus in a capital murder case because counsel failed to present mitigating evidence during the sentencing hearing.

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16
Safeguarding the Susceptible: Protecting Long-Term Care Patients During a Pandemic

Residents and staff in long-term care facilities account for an estimated one-third of COVID-19 related deaths in the U.S., despite only 11 percent of cases occurring in these facilities. In a handful of states this estimate is even higher, with residents accounting for over half the state’s fatalities.

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Category: Health, COVID-19
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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.