The NCSL Blog

Entries for November 2020

23
Alaskans Approve Sweeping Election Changes

Election results might be old news in most states, but in Alaska, it’s still breaking news.

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19
COVID-19 Appears to Exacerbate Risky Driving Behaviors

A couple of months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit the U.S., traffic safety experts expressed concern over what they were seeing on the country’s streets and highways. While many Americans were homebound by stay-at-home orders, road fatalities were not decreasing at the expected rate.

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19
States Leading the Way on Immigrant Integration

NCSL’s Task Force on Immigration and the States has been examining immigration challenges and proposing common sense reforms since it was formed in 2006. This week, task force cochairs Nevada State Senator Mo Denis and Nebraska State Senator John McCollister highlighted success stories in their states for the National Immigration Forum’s Leading the Way conference.

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Category: Immigration
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19
Celebrating State Innovations on National Rural Health Day 2020

Rural residents across the U.S. may be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 due to the aging population, higher rates of underlying chronic disease, and higher likelihood of having a disability.

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18
Ballot Measures Change Legislative Operations

In addition to establishing or continuing COVID-19 protocols, a handful of states sought voter approval on alterations to legislative operations. These may not be the flashiest of ballot measures—they don’t get the same attention as marijuana or election measures, for example—but they directly affect NCSL’s members and how they members can do their jobs.

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18
Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Significant Land Use Case

The Supreme Court has required governments to pay “just compensation” to property owners where the government “requires an owner to suffer a permanent physical invasion of her property—however minor.” 

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18
States Ramp Up Road User Charging Pilots and Studies

Statehouses have been at the forefront of considering road user charges (RUC) since Oregon enacted the first bill to study RUC as a potential replacement for the gas tax in 2001. This is perhaps fitting given Oregon created the nation’s first gas tax over a century ago in 1919.

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Category: Transportation
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17
Privacy Concerns Translate to Ballot Measures in 2020

Statewide ballot measures cover a broad range of topics, but privacy measures are not often among them, despite Americans’ growing concerns about the issue and an increasing number of consumer privacy bills introduced in state legislatures recently, many similar to and motivated by the California Consumer Privacy Act. This year, however, two significant privacy-protecting measures were on the ballot and approved by voters in California and Michigan.

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17
Remote Learning Creates Tradeoffs for Education Policymakers

As governors and public health officials imposed stay-at-home orders last spring, educators, students and families rapidly adjusted to digital learning and other emergency measures. Over the summer and fall, questions about whether and how schools would open safely have been top of mind for policymakers and millions of Americans.

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17
NCSL Kicks Off Project to Expand Understanding of Road User Charging

Since the early 2000s, states have been at the forefront of discussions to explore possible replacements for the motor fuel tax.

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Category: Transportation
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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.