The NCSL Blog

Entries for January 2018

31
SCOTUS Gives Officers Immunity in House Party Arrests

In District of Columbia v. Wesby, the majority of the Supreme Court ruled D.C. police officers had probable cause to arrest individuals for holding a “raucous, late-night party in a house they did not have permission to enter.” 

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
31
Can You Sue for Retaliatory Arrest if Probable Cause Existed?

If probable cause exists to arrest someone, should that arrestee be barred from bringing a First Amendment retaliatory lawsuit?

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
31
Staff Spotlight: Eric Glover Moved from Courtroom to Library

Eric Glover joined the Idaho Legislative Research Library in summer 2016 as Legislative Librarian. His duties include oversight of the library, providing research and reference services, cataloging, collection maintenance, and indexing. 

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
31
Look What's In the New State Legislatures Magazine

Is it getting warm in here? Supporting nearly 9,000 U.S. companies and employing more than 250,000 Americans, the solar energy industry is getting tough for lawmakers to ignore. “The policies we create in the legislature send the signals to the industry on whether to invest in our state or not,” Nevada Assemblyman Chris Brooks says.

Continue >

Category: Magazine
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
30
Supreme Court to Decide Tribal Fishing Rights Case

In the mid-1800s, Indian tribes in the Pacific Northwest entered into treaties guaranteeing them a right to off-reservation fishing. In Washington v. United States the Supreme Court will decide whether the “fishing clause” guarantees “that the number of fish would always be sufficient to provide a ‘moderate living’ to the tribes.”

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
26
Human Trafficking: See Something, Say Something

The covert nature of trafficking crimes means the public is often unaware that they can occur close to home, at their neighborhood store, and that businesses in their neighborhood may benefit from, or be used as conduits for, sex and labor trafficking. But there are plenty of  examples that showcase the power of public awareness is battling human trafficking.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
25
Jan. 29 Webinar: 2017 Election Administration Legislation Review

Now that 2017 is done and dusted, it’s time to take a comprehensive look back at last year’s election administration legislation.

Continue >

Category: Elections
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
25
Staff Spotlight: Theresa Holst, Manager of Visitor Services, Colorado Legislative Council

Theresa began her career in state government working as a staffer in the Colorado House of Representatives in 2005.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
25
Court-Drawn Texas Redistricting Plan Goes to the Supreme Court (Again)

What if a district court adopts a redistricting plan and the state legislature later codifies that plan? May the same district court later rule the redistricting plan is unlawful and/or unconstitutional? That is what the Supreme Court will decide in Abbott v. Perez.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
24
SCOTUS Extensively Cites SLLC Amicus Brief in Statute of Limitations Case

Artis is a simple case. But it took the U.S. Supreme Court almost 40 pages and more emotion than one might expect to complete its opinion.

Continue >

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |
Page 1 of 4First   Previous   [1]  2  3  4  Next   Last   

Subscribe to the NCSL Blog

Click on the RSS feed at left to add the NCSL Blog to your favorite RSS reader. 

About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.