The NCSL Blog

16

By Lucia Bragg

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) released it’s 2018-2022 Strategic Plan on Thursday.

  Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Brock Long. Cliff Owen/AP The plan aims to coordinate with intergovernmental stakeholders to unify and professionalize emergency management across the country, and to ensure that response and recovery is “federally coordinated, state managed, and locally executed.” The plan lists the following three goals over the next five years:

  • Build a culture of preparedness: Every segment of our society, from individual to government, industry to philanthropy, must be encouraged and empowered with the information it needs to prepare for the inevitable impacts of future disasters.
  • Ready the nation for catastrophic disasters: FEMA will work with its partners across all levels of government to strengthen partnerships and access new sources of scalable capabilities to quickly meet the needs of overwhelming incidents.
  • Reduce the complexity of FEMA: FEMA must continue to be responsible stewards of the resources we are entrusted to administer. We must also do everything that we can to leverage data to drive decision-making, and reduce the administrative and bureaucratic burdens that impede affected people and communities from quickly receiving the assistance they need.

In addition to the 2018-2022 Strategic Plan, FEMA recently issued a request for comment on its National Mitigation Investment Strategy (NMIS) draft.

The NMIS coordinates investments in mitigation activities and risk management among federal departments and agencies; state, territorial, tribal, and local governments; and private and nonprofit sector entities. NCSL filed comments with FEMA last week echoing FEMA’s goal of broad collaboration but cautioning against cost shifts from federal to state governments. The final NMIS is scheduled to be published in November following comment review over the summer.

Lucia Bragg is a policy associate with NCSL's State-Federal Relations Division.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.