The NCSL Blog

23
ADA at Issue in Supreme Court Ruling on Curbside Voting in Alabama

The U.S. Supreme Court has frozen a district court order that lifted Alabama’s ban on curbside voting. As a result, Alabama must halt curbside voting.

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21
Elections 2020: Former Legislators Running for Congress

Since 2005, about half of U.S. representatives and senators have had state legislative experience, ranging between 48% and 51%. Currently, 49% of our federal lawmakers are former state legislators: 24 Republican and 22 Democratic U.S. senators, and 91 Republican and 105 Democratic U.S. representatives, along with one independent and one New Progressive Party member.

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20
What If an Absentee Voter Dies Before Election Day?

What happens when an eligible voter casts an absentee ballot and then passes away before Election Day? This question comes up more and more, as absentee/mail voting, and even early in-person voting, gain in popularity. 

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20
U.S. Supreme Court Allows Pennsylvania to Count Ballots Received After Election

In a 4-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision that requires ballots received up to three days after the election to be counted to stand. Ballots clearly postmarked after 8 p.m. on election night will not be counted if they arrive later than 5 p.m. on Nov. 6.

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19
Here and There: Elections Turnout Around the Globe

We met up with The Carter Center’s Avery Davis-Roberts again, this time to discuss voter turnout. In 2016, the U.S. voting-age participation was 55.7%. That’s a high turnout rate for the U.S., but it’s low compared to our peers in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Belgium, Sweden and Denmark all saw turnout rates of over 80% in their most recent elections.

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19
Supreme Court to Decide if Census Results May Exclude Undocumented Persons

On Nov. 30, one month before the secretary of commerce is supposed to report to the president the results of the census, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument in New York v. Trump. In this case, a three-judge panel ruled that the secretary of commerce may not provide the president with a census count that excludes undocumented persons. The state-by-state population breakdown the secretary of commerce provides to the president is used to apportion seats to the House of Representatives.

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15
10 Things to Know About the 2020 Elections

This year’s election season is about a whole lot more than who will live in the White House on Jan. 20. From NCSL’s perspective, it’s all about, who will be running the states.

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15
State Elections 2020: Marijuana Ballot Measures 

Proposals to allow for medical or adult use of cannabis continue to grow across the country, with eight measures appearing on ballots in five states.

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14
Revisiting Kentucky’s Juvenile Justice Reforms

New data shows a big impact on Kentucky’s juvenile justice system arising from the state’s passage of comprehensive juvenile justice reform legislation in 2014.

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14
Supreme Court Allows Census Count to Stop

The Supreme Court has frozen in place a district court order requiring the Census Bureau to continue counting people through Oct. 31. As a result, the Census Bureau may immediately stop the count. 

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.