Early Care and Education E-Update, Winter 2012-2013

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IN THIS ISSUE

Resources of Interest

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EARLY LEARNING FELLOWS UPDATE

NCSL Early Learning Fellows logoWithin the next few months, NCSL will announce another round of Early Learning Fellows applications. Legislative leaders will have an opportunity to nominate legislators who would like to become more engaged over the coming year on birth-to-eight policies. The fellows’ work in 2013 will include two in-person meetings and two webinars on emergent and innovative early childhood issues. The kick-off meeting will be in May in Denver and a final meeting in Washington, D.C. December 2013. Each meeting will be held as a preconference or postconference to the NCSL Spring and Fall Forums, respectively. We will also conduct two webinars in July and September 2013 covering topics that are of interest to the Fellows. Learn more about the 2011 inagural Early Learning Fellows program HERE. Please contact Julie.Poppe@ncsl.org for more information.

HOME VISITING UPDATE

In July 2012, the Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy (a nonprofit organization that conducts research of the effectiveness of social programs) released a report on their randomized controlled study and evaluation of the Child FIRST home visitation program. The study was part of a systematic review of social interventions in the areas of early childhood development, K-12 education, crime prevention, health care and homelessness among others. More information on all research initiatives are available HERE.

Child FIRST, based in Bridgeport, Conn., serves low-income families with young children at high-risk of emotional, behavioral, or developmental problems, or child maltreatment through home visits by trained clinicians. Results of the three-year evaluation study found that families and children participating in Child FIRST were less likely to be involved in child protective services agencies, experience fewer behavioral and language development problems, and undergo less maternal stress. The program did not achieve a ‘top tier’ ranking due to its limited research sample and could benefit from additional site implementation and research studies to further validate initial results. In all, the cost to administer Child FIRST is approximately $6,800 per family (in 2012 dollars).

More detailed information about the Child FIRST research study, its benefits and costs are available HERE. Information about the program is available at Child FIRST.

For more information about state and federal home visiting initiatives, including a comprehensive list of legislation in 50 states and the territories, state policy overview, and other home visiting resources, visit the NCSL Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting webpage. To receive periodic information and stay on top of state developments and federal updates, sign up for the home visiting listserv today by contacting Phuonglan.Nguyen@ncsl.org.

WRAP UP FROM NCSL 2012 FALL FORUM

Logo for Fall Forum 2012


This year’s NCSL Fall Forum was held Dec. 5-7 in Washington, D.C. The annual event was a wonderful success with attendance reaching close to 650, an increase from 2011 Fall Forum in Tampa, Florida. On the first day of the Forum, hundreds of state legisators gathered on Capitol Hill to lobby for the Marketplace Fairness Act. The Human Services and Welfare Committee had a full agenda including sessions on teen pregnancy, child welfare and child support. Learn more about  NCSL Forums HERE. Be sure to mark your calendar and make plans to come to NCSL’s Spring Forum in Denver on May 2-4, 2013.




 

CHILD CARE AND EARLY EDUCATION 2012 LEGISLATIVE ACTION

During the 2012 legislative session, state lawmakers introduced more than 800 bills in 46 states to address issues relating to young children. In all, lawmakers enacted 92 bills on child care quality, licensing and costs; school readiness and kindergarten assessments, and early literacy development.

Seventeen states enacted 29 bills to expand licensing exemptions, modified existing laws to allow state agencies more flexibility in the administration, oversight and funding of child care. Twenty-one bills were enacted in 16 states to address governance, align state services and programs, and increase collaboration across different state agencies and departments that manage early education and child care programs. School readiness, kindergarten access, assessments and age requirements, and funding allocation for state programs were addressed through 21 enacted bills in 16 states. In addition, states focused on developing strategies to build children’s literacy skills in the early grades (prekindergarten and younger) and ensure reading proficiency and overall academic success. Other topics of enacted bills in 2012 include evidence-based early childhood prevention strategies such as home visiting and issues relating professional development, standards and credentialing of the early childhood workforce.  

This report provides an overview and analysis of these enacted state legislative actions.

Details on all 2012 early education and care enacted legislation are included in the NCSL Report, "Child Care and Early Education 2012 Legislative Action." Previous years’ legislative action reports on early education and  care are available HERE.

STATE BUDGET ACTIONS IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION

State legislators continue to look closely at state investments in child care, pre-kindergarten, home visiting and other early childhood programs. Based on NCSL’s Fall 2012 State Budget Update report and survey of states’ fiscal offices, state budgets and revenues continue to slowly recover as legislatures convene for the 2013 session. Additionally, federal budget actions and pressures will continue to pose challenges to state legislatures to look closer at early care and education policy and funding.  

In December 2012, NCSL surveyed state fiscal offices to capture and track states’ appropriations and budgets for FY 2012-13 in early care and education programs. Preliminary findings from the survey will be available in spring 2013. Previous years’ survey results of 50-state investments in child care, pre-kindergarten, home visiting and other early childhood program are available HERE. For more information about states’ budgets and appropriations in early education, please contact Julie.Poppe@ncsl.org or Phuonglan.Nguyen@ncsl.org.

ACRONYMS - WHAT DO ALL THOSE LETTERS MEAN?

Boy with lettered blocksDo you ever feel as if you're swimming in acronym stew? Unsure if you really know what all those letters standing side by side mean? We know how easy it is to get bogged down, overwhelmed and frustrated by all the acronyms being used in everyday speech.  

Last quarter 20 common Early Care and Education acronyms were highlighted, and below are 20 additional popular Early Care and Education acronyms. Click HERE for the complete list. If you have other acronym suggestions to highlight in future Early Care and Education E-updates please contact Alison.May@ncsl.org.   


 

ACF Administration for Children and Families
CCDF Child Care and Development Fund
CCR & R Child Care Resource and Referral
CDS Child Development Services
DCTC Dependent Care Tax Credit
EITC Earned Income Tax Credit
EPS Essential Programs and Services
ESY Extended School Year
FSSA Family and Social Services Administration
FAPE Free Appropriate Public Education
GPRA Government Performance and Results Act
IFSP Individualized Family Service Plan
IEU Intermediate Educational Unit
LEA/SEA Local Education Agency/State Education Agency
NECTAC National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center
OSEP Office of Special Education Programs
PET Pupil Evaluation Team
SAU School Administrative Unit
SSBG Social Services Block Grant
TANF

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

 

WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST STAFF MEMBER

Robyn Lipkowitz is a program director for the Children & Families Program at the National Conference of State Legislatures in Denver, CO. She coordinates NCLS’s work on issues related to child care and early education for young children. Ms. Lipkowitz recently joined NCSL from Utah where she managed the Utah Department of Health’s Office of Home Visiting and administered the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting grant program. Prior to her work at Office of Home Visiting, Ms. Lipkowitz worked as a policy analyst for Voices for Utah Children with a focus on early care and education policy. She holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Texas. You may contact Robyn at Robyn.Lipkowitz@ncsl.org or (303) 856-1420.

THE SCIENCE OF NEGLECT:  THE PERSISTENT ABSENCE OF RESPONSIVE CARE DISRUPTS THE DEVELOPING BRAIN:  WORKING PAPER 12

Source:  Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University - December 2012

This is the 12th working paper in a series by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. This paper explains why significant deprivation is so harmful in the earliest years of life and why effective interventions are likely to pay significant dividends in better long-term outcomes in learning, health, and parenting of the next generation. Read the full working paper.

EARLY CHILDHOOD RISK AND REACH IN LOUISIANA

Source: LSU/Tulane Early Childhood Policy and Data Center - Fall 2012

This report is unique nationally in presenting these data in map format to visually compare and contrast the risks and reach locally as well as statewide. The information, complemented by the separate Early Childhood System Integration Budget, is designed as a tool to be used by all early childhood stakeholders, governmental and nongovernmental, in order to better inform policy and funding decisions and the distribution of critical resources. Read the full report.  

DOWNWARD SLIDE:  STATE CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE POLICIES 2012

Source:  National Women's Law Center -October 2012


The National Women's Law Center's ninth annual review of key child care subsidy policies in all 50 states and the District of Columbia reveals that families were worse off in 27 states than they were in 2011 under one or more child care assistance policies. Families are not only worse off in 2012 than they were in 2011, but are also worse off than a decade ago. Download the full report.

YOUNG CHILDREN AT RISK:  NATIONAL AND STATE PREVALENCE OF RISK FACTORS

Source:  National Center for Children in Poverty – October 2012

The national and state prevalence data presented here, along with additional results available from NCCP’s Young Child Risk Calculator, highlight groups of vulnerable children and families whose needs can be addressed through a wide range of family support, health, and education policies. Information about the size and characteristics of a state’s population of young, at-risk children can inform policy decisions about investments in new or expanded supports that help mitigate risks and improve life outcomes for these children. Download the fact sheet.

PRACTICES FOR PROMOTING YOUNG CHILDREN'S LEARNING IN QRIS

Source:  National Center for Children in Poverty – September 2012

This brief provides an examination of the strength of supports for children’s early learning in Quality Rating Improvement System standards based on an analysis of QRIS standards in 23 states. Download the full brief.

SAVINGS NOW, SAVINGS LATER

Source:  ReadyNation – September 2012

This brief from ReadyNation outlines how early childhood programs such as home visiting and quality prekindergarten don’t just pay dividends 10 or 20 years down the road, but create real savings in a year or less. Read the full brief.

PREK-3RD RESOURCES

Source:  Foundation for Child Development – March 2011

Updated key resources and materials for policymakers, educators, researchers and others about PreK-3rd issues compiled by FCD. Key resources are broken down by the following categories: The Case for PreK-3rd, Financing PreK-3rd, Implementing PreK-3rd, Teacher Preparation/Professional Development, Leadership by Educators, Federal Policy, State Policy, School District Policy, Research Basis for PreK-3rd. Download the resources.


Outside links are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute an endorsement by NCSL.

This e-update is made possible by the generous support of the Birth to Five Policy Alliance. This e-update is an informational service for state legislators and legislative staff who are part of NCSL's Child Care and Early Education Legislative Network. Contact Alison May for more information, (303) 856-1473 or to offer information from your state. You may also request to subscribe, if you are a legislator or legislative staff or unsubscribe by emailing Alison.May@ncsl.org.

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