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Termination of Child Support Age of Majority

Termination of Support- Age of Majority

Last Updated: March 2015

five kids sitting togetherThe "age of majority" is the legal age established under state law at which an individual is no longer a minor and, as a young adult, has the right and responsibility to make certain legal choices that adults make. Thus, when people use the term age of majority, they are generally referring to when a young person reaches the age where one is considered to be an adult.  In some states, child support stops when a child is 18 or graduates from high school, in others, it stops at 21. The majority of states use 18 as the age of majority (in cases where the youth is still in high school the age of majority may extend beyond 18). States may order support while a child is in college (For more information, visit Termination of Support- College Support Beyond the Age of Majority), or if the child is disabled (For more information, visit Termination of Support- Exception for Adult Children with Disabilities).

State Age of Majority in State Statutory Citation for the Age of Majority

Alabama

19 years of age; child support ceases at the age of majority.

Ala. Code § 26-1-1

Alaska

18 years of age; child support ceases at age of majority unless the child is enrolled in high school and living in the home of a parent, guardian, or designee of the parent or guardian.

Alaska Stat. §25.20.010, §25.24.140(a)(3), §25.24.170(a)

Arizona

18 years of age; if a child reaches the age of majority whil the child is attending high school or a certified high school equivalency program, support shall continue to be provided during the period in which the child is actually attending high school or the equivalency program but only until the child reaches age 19.

Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 25-320(F), § 25-501(A)

Arkansas

18 years of age; child support ceases at age of majority unless the child is still attending high school. If the child is still attending high school, upon the child's high school graduation or the end of the school year after the child reaches 19 years of age, whichever is earlier.

Ark. Code Ann. §9-14-237

California

18 years of age except an unmarried child who has attained the age of 18 years, is a full-time high school student, and who is not self-supporting, is considered a minor until the time the child completes the 12th grade or attains the age of 19 years, whichever occurs first.

Family Code §3901

Colorado

19 years of age unless otherwise emancipated. Emancipation occurs and child support terminates without either party filing a motion when the last or only child turns 19 unless, the child is still in high school or an equivalent program, support continues until the end of the month following graduation. A child who ceases to attend high school prior to graduation and later reenrolls is entitled to support upon reenrollment and until the end of the month following graduation, but not beyond age 21.

Colo. Rev. Stat. §14-10-115 (13) for orders entered after July 1, 1997

Colo. Rev. Stat. §14-10-115 (15) for orders entered prior to July 1, 1997

Connecticut

18 years of age; child support ceases upon the age of majority unless the child who has attained the age of 18 and is a full-time high school student, then the parents shall maintain the child according to their respective abilities if the child is in need of maintenance until such child completes 12th grad or attains the age of 19, whichever occurs first.

Conn. Gen. Stat. §1-1d; Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b-84

Delaware

18 years of age, extends past majority if child is in high school and is likely to graduate or reaches of age of 19, whichever occurs first.

Del. Code Ann. tit. 13, §501(a)(b)(c)(d)

District of Columbia

21 years of age, or at the point the minor is self supporting through marriage, employment or military service.

D.C. Code Ann. §46-101; Nelson v Nelson, 548 A.2d 109, 111 (D.C. 1988)

Florida

18 years of age, or beyond if the person is dependent in fact, is between the ages of 18 and 19, and is still in high school, performing in good faith with a reasonable expectation of graduation before the age of 19.

Fla. Stat. §61.14(9); §743.07

Georgia

Age 18: Support order entered after 7/1/92 may provide for the extension of child support to age 20, if the child is still in high school.

Ga. Code §39-1-1; §19-6-15(e)

Guam

18 years of age

19 Guam Code Ann. §5102(c)

Hawaii

18 years of age; child support ceases upon age 19 unless proof is shown that child is presently enrolled as a full-time student in school or has been accepted into and plans to attend as a full-time student for the next semester a post-high school university, college or vocational school.

Hawaii Rev. Stat. §577-1; Hawaii Rev. Stat. § 576E-14; Hawaii Rev. Stat. § 584-18

Idaho

18 years of age; May continue until child completes high school or reaches age 19, whichever occurs first.

Idaho Code §32-706

Illinois

18 years of age, or 19 if the child is still attending high school.

Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 755, §5/11-1 Ill Rev. Stat. ch. 750 §5/505

Indiana

19 years of age; child support ceases when the child turns 21.

Ind. Code §31-16-6-6

Iowa

18 years of age. May extend to 19 if child is pursuing completion of high school or the equivalent.

Iowa Code §599.1; Iowa Code §252A.3(2)

Kansas

18 years of age; child support ceases at age 18 unless the child reaches 18 before completing the child's high school education, but no later than age 19.

Kan. Stat. Ann. §38-101; Kan. Stat. Ann. §23-3001

Kentucky

18 years of age, 19 if attending high school

Ky. Rev. Stat. §403.213(3)

Louisiana

18 years of age; may continue if the child is a full-time student in secondary school or its equivalent, has not reached age 19, and is dependent upon either parent.

La. Civil Code Ann. art. 29; La. Children's Code Ann. art. 1301.3

Maine

18 years of age, unless the child is in secondary school, then 19 years of age or until graduation, whichever occurs first.

Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 19-A, §1653(12)

Maryland

Age 18 or up to 19 as long as child enrolled in secondary school.

Md. Ann. Code art. 1, § 24

Massachusetts

18 years of age. May extend to 21 if child is living with the parent and is enrolled in an educational program.

Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 4, §7(48); Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 209, §37

Michigan

18, but may order until 19 1/2 for completion of high school, or beyond 19 1/2 by agreement of the parties.

Mich. Comp. Laws  §722.52; §552.605b

Minnesota

18 years of age, or until age 20 if the child is still attending secondary school, whichever occurs later, or an individual who is incapable of self-support by reason of disability.

Minn. Stat. §518A.26, subd.5

Mississippi

21 years of age; child support ceases upon the age of majority.

Miss. Code Ann. §93-11-65(8)(a)

Missouri

18 years of age, or until graduation from secondary school or age 21, whichever occurs first.

Mo. Rev. Stat. §452.340

Montana

18 or upon graduation from high school, whichever is later, but no later than 19.

Mont. Code Ann. §40-4-208(5); §40-5-201(2)

Nebraska

19 years of age

Neb. Rev. Stat. §43-2101; §42-371.01

Nevada

Age of majority is 18; or up to a maximum age of 19, if a student is enrolled in, but has not yet completed high school.

Nev. Rev. Stat. §129.010 Nev. Rev. Stat. §125.510(9), Nev. Rev. Stat. §425.300

New Hampshire

Until age 18 or completes high school, whichever is later; or if the child becomes married or a member of the armed services.

N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §461-A:14(IV)

New Jersey

The age of majority is 18 years old, unless the child is still attending high school or other secondary school.

N.J. Rev. Stat. §2A:4-30.65; N.J. Rev. Stat. Ann. §9:17B-3; N.J. Rev. Stat. Ann. §2A:34-23; See NJ Child Support Guidlines link Appendix IX-A, 24 & 25.

New Mexico

18 years of age, unless still in high school, then up to 19 years of age.

N.M. Stat. Ann. §40-4-7(B)(3)(b)

New York

18 years of age; child support may continue until the child reaches 21 years of age

Family Court §413(1)a

North Carolina

18 years, unless attending secondary school full time or up to age 20 whichever comes first.

N.C. Gen. Stat. §50-13.4

North Dakota

18 years of age. May extend past 18 if still in high school. Support ends when the child graduates from high school or reaches 19 years of age.

N.D. Cent. Code §14-09-08.2

Ohio

18 years of age, or as long as the child attends high school on a full time basis or a court order requires the duty of support to continue. Unless specified in the court order.

Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §3109.01; Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §3119.88; Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §3119.86

Oklahoma

18 years of age, or if the child is regularly attending high school, other means of high school education, or an alternative high school education program as a full-time student, the child shall be entitled to support by the parents until the child graduates or turns 20.

Okla. Stat. tit. 43, §112(E)

Oregon

18 years old and may continue to age 21 years old if attending an educational facility such as a high school, community college, four-year college or university.

Or. Rev. Stat. §109.510; Or. Rev. Stat. §107.108

Pennsylvania

18 years of age or graduation from high school, whichever occurs later.

Pa. Cons. Stat. tit. 23, §4321(2); Pa. Cons. Stat. tit. 23, §4327;

Puerto Rico

21 years of age. A minor may be emancipated prior to reaching the age of majority by virtue of marriage, judicial decree (based on orphan or self-support status), or parental consent, if child is beyond 18 years old.

31 L.P.R.A. §971; 31 L.P.R.A. § 911; 31 L.P.R.A. §931; 31 L.P.R.A. §912 & §951.

Rhode Island

18 years of age, unless the child is still in high school, then for 90 days following graduation but in no case past the child's 19th birthday.

R.I. Gen. Laws §15-5-16.2(b)

South Carolina

18 years of age or until otherwise emancipated. Possibly past the 18 if the child is enrolled and still attending high school, not to exceed high school graduation or the end of the school year after the child reaches 19, whichever is later.

S.C. Code Ann. §63-3-530(17)

South Dakota

18 or until 19 years of age, if full-time student in a secondary school.

S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §25-5-18.1

Tennessee

18 years of age, unless child is still in high school; then in such cases emancipation occurs when child graduates from high school or when class child is in when he/she reaches 18 graduates.

Tenn. Code Ann. §34-1-102

Texas

18 years of age. May continue past 18 if in high school.

Tex. Family Code Ann. §101.003; Tex. Family Code Ann. §154.001

Utah

18 years of age or has graduated from high school during the child's normal and expected year of graduation, which ever occurs later.

Utah Code Ann. §78B-12-219

Vermont

18 years of age; court may order support to be continued until the child attains the age of majority or terminates secondary education, whichever is later.

Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 1, §173; Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 15, §201

Virgin Islands

18. Support may be continued up to age 22, if the child is enrolled and attending an accredited college or university on a full time basis, pursuing a high school diploma or enrolled in a vocational program.

16 V.I.C. Sec 341(g)

Virginia

18 years of age. May continue until the child turns 19 or graduations from high school, whichever occurs first.

Va. Code §16.1-228; Va. Code § 20-60.3

Washington

18 years of age; may extend child support if a child is still in high school under certain circumstances.

Wash. Rev. Code §26.28.010

West Virginia

18 years of age. May continue past 18 if the child is a full time student in a secondary education or vocational program.

W. Va. Code §48-11-103

Wisconsin

18 years of age or up to 19 if the child is pursuing an accredited course of instruction leading to the acquisition of a high school diploma or its equivalent.

Wis. Stat. §54.01(20)

Wyoming

18 years of age.

Wyo. Stat. §14-1-101; §14-2-204

 

*PLEASE NOTE: The National Conference of State Legislatures is an organization serving state legislators and their staff. We cannot offer legal advice or assistance with individual cases, but we do try to answer questions on general topics.

About This NCSL Project

NCSL staff in D.C. and Denver can provide comprehensive, thorough, and timely information on critical child support policy issues. We provide services to legislators and staff working to improve state policies affecting children and their families. NCSL's online clearinghouse for state legislators includes resources on child support policy, financing, laws, research and promising practices. Technical assistance visits to states are available to any state legislature that would like training or assistance related to this topic.  

The Denver-based child support project staff focuses on state policy, tracking legislation and providing research and policy analysis, consultation, and technical assistance specifically geared to the legislative audience. Denver staff can be reached at (303) 364-7700 or cyf-info@ncsl.org.

NCSL staff in Washington, D.C. track and analyze federal legislation and policy and represent state legislatures on child support issues before Congress and the Administration. In D.C., Joy Johnson Wilson at 202-624-8689 or by e-mail at joy.wilson@ncsl.org and Rachel Morgan at (202) 624-3569 or by e-mail at rachel.morgan@ncsl.org.

The child support project and D.C. human services staff receive guidance and support from NCSL's Standing Committee on Health & Human Services.

For more information regarding NCSL's child support work, please visit our Child Support Homepage.

 

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