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States Address the Costs of Diabetes A 50 State Budget Survey for Fiscal Year 2013

States Address the Costs of Diabetes | State Budget Survey Results

1/15/2014

A 50-State Budget Survey for Fiscal Year 2013

New report, released in January 2014

Released to the public March 2014

State governments spend millions of dollars each year to educate about, treat and prevent all forms of diabetes (e.g., type 1, type 2, gestational and pre-diabetes) and its complications. Many of these activities are paid for through state budget appropriations. Documenting the financial impact of the diabetes epidemic, the "Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S." estimates that in 2012 national spending on direct medical costs for diagnosed diabetes totaled $176 billion. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) completed a similar analysis in 2007, determining that direct medical costs were $116 billion. The new number represents a $60 billion increase in annual spending to treat diabetes in just five years.

Medical records photoGenerally, state budget trends for fiscal year (FY) 2013 reflected slow and steady revenue growth, but states remained cautious. As of April 2013, the National Conference of State Legislatures’ "State Budget Update" reported 37 states and the District of Columbia expected revenues to meet earlier estimates, eight states indicated revenues could exceed estimates and four reported revenues as unlikely to meet forecasts. Within this broad context, for FY 2013, some states increased general fund spending on diabetes, aided in part by higher revenues from taxes, fees and other typical state sources.

To assess how states are responding to the diabetes epidemic, NCSL conducted a 50-state analysis of appropriations for FY 2013. The analysis included a review of state budgets and related state budget documents that explicitly identified appropriations for diabetes programs. In addition, the methodology used included discussions with state fiscal offices, legislative services and state departments of health. This survey follows 50-state analyses of FY 2011 and FY 2012 state budgets dedicated to spending and appropriations on diabetes activities, published by the NCSL Health Program.

Click here for full document.  Total: 8 pages, PDF format.

 

Additional Resources

Previous NCSL Diabetes Budget Reports

NCSL Diabetes Web Portal, 2014

NCSL Contact

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FY 2013 Budget Survey Supplement:  The New CDC Funding Formula

In July 2013, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the details of the new federal funding process that includes funding for diabetes.  The material below is transcribed directly from the CDC website, updated July 19, 2013.  Note the "enhanced component," which offers between $1 million and $1.7 million to 32 designated individual states.

 "CDC Programs Work Together to Improve Health for All Americans

Four CDC programs work together through this program to support chronic disease prevention programs nationwide. Those programs are: diabetesheart disease and stroke prevention;nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; and school health. These chronic diseases often happen at the same time and are the result of risk factors that are related. The strategies to prevent these health conditions are often similar and by combining approaches, public health programs can work together to be more impactful and efficient. This combined effort builds upon lessons learned in controlling diabetes, heart disease, and obesity, and promoting school health.

States focus work in four areas:

  1. Epidemiology, surveillance, and evaluation to inform, prioritize, and monitor diseases and risk factors and the delivery of interventions.
  2. Environmental strategies that reinforce healthful behaviors and expand access to healthy choices.
  3. Health systems interventions to improve the delivery and use of clinical and other preventive services.
  4. Clinical and community linkages to better support chronic disease self-management.

The funding award has three short-term goals:

  1. Improve environments in worksites, schools, early childhood education services, state and local government agencies, and community settings to promote healthy behaviors. Also, to expand access to healthy choices for people of all ages related to diabetes, cardiovascular health, physical activity, healthy foods and beverages, obesity, and breastfeeding.
  2. Improve the delivery and use of quality clinical and other health services aimed at preventing and managing high blood pressure and diabetes.
  3. Increase links between community and clinical organizations to support prevention, self-management and control of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity.

The program funds two components with project periods of up to 5 years. All states and the District of Columbia are funded for a non-competitive, basic component. In addition to basic funding, 32 states are funded for a competitive, enhanced component.

State Basic Component Enhanced Component *
Alabama $ 596,217 $ 0
Alaska $ 503,091 $ 0
Arizona $ 624,405 $ 1,291,468
Arkansas $ 601,480 $ 1,108,016
California $ 744,997 $ 1,704,640
Colorado $ 522,169 $ 1,218,691
Connecticut $ 515,514 $ 1,033,174
Delaware $ 503,930 $ 0
District of Columbia $ 598,939 $ 0
Florida $ 582,208 $ 1,582,160
Georgia $ 635,818 $ 0
Hawaii $ 505,956 $ 0
Idaho $ 506,867 $ 1,000,000
Illinois $ 555,757 $ 0
Indiana $ 528,234 $ 1,269,943
Iowa $ 513,268 $ 1,022,784
Kansas $ 512,434 $ 1,065,400
Kentucky $ 604,155 $ 1,097,748
Louisiana $ 615,132 $ 0
Maine $ 505,754 $ 1,047,646
Maryland $ 525,251 $ 1,205,370
Massachusetts $ 528,540 $ 1,197,310
Michigan $ 542,789 $ 1,420,615
Minnesota $ 523,157 $ 1,205,370
Mississippi $ 618,805 $ 1,119,272
Missouri $ 526,042 $ 1,248,419
Montana $ 504,325 $ 1,076,223
Nebraska $ 507,983 $ 1,026,266
Nevada $ 511,799 $ 0
New Hampshire $ 505,711 $ 0
New Jersey $ 538,218 $ 1,348,827
New Mexico $ 609,375 $ 0
New York $ 584,334 $ 1,603,540
North Carolina $ 625,549 $ 1,442,139
North Dakota $ 502,963 $ 0
Ohio $ 550,019 $ 0
Oklahoma $ 516,427 $ 0
Oregon $ 516,775 $ 1,032,696
Pennsylvania $ 555,209 $ 1,560,779
Rhode Island $ 504,555 $ 1,047,646
South Carolina $ 603,983 $ 1,243,450
South Dakota $ 503,570 $ 0
Tennessee $ 610,952 $ 1,243,268
Texas $ 700,496 $ 0
Utah $ 512,204 $ 1,033,174
Vermont $ 502,714 $ 0
Virginia $ 535,079 $ 1,377,566
Washington $ 529,590 $ 1,399,090
West Virginia $ 592,255 $ 0
Wisconsin $ 524,746 $ 1,226,894
Wyoming $ 502,460 $ 0

* Anticipated award amounts.

 

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