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New Mexico State Profile and Policy Report

New Mexico State Profile and Policy Report

Heart Disease and Stroke Burden

Table of Contents

New Mexico - State Deaths for Heart Disease and Stroke

  • Nearly 1 out of 4 deaths in New Mexico are due to heart disease.

  • 3,411 New Mexicans died from heart disease in 2006 (22.3 percent of total deaths in New Mexico).

  • 739 New Mexicans died from stroke in 2006 (4.8 percent of total deaths in New Mexico).
    Source: National Vital Statistics Report, 2009.

New Mexico - 2007 State Risk Factors for Heart Disease and Stroke

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

New Mexico - 2003 State Costs for Cardiovascular Disease

In October 2007, the Milken Institute, an independent research group, released a study, An Unhealthy America: The Economic Impact of Chronic Disease. The study details the economic effects of treatment costs resulting from chronic disease in the United States. Below is a breakdown of New Mexico’s estimated medical costs to treat heart disease, hypertension and stroke based on 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data.   

New Mexico Annual Cost of Hypertension, Heart Disease and Stroke 

Treatment Expenditures (Direct Costs) - Total annual medical cost.      

Hypertension 

$.12 billion

Heart Disease          

$.26 billion

Stroke                     

$.05 billion

 

 
Source: Milken Institute, An Unhealthy America: The Economic Impact of Chronic Disease, October 2007. 

 

New Mexico - Estimated 2007 Medicaid Treatment Costs for Cardiovascular Diseases
 

Based on New Mexico's Medicaid population, economic estimates for 2007 were projected using Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data.  Medicaid spending has grown rapidly in recent years, placing a significant burden on state budgets.  To help states estimate the financial impact of cardiovascular diseases among their Medicaid beneficiaries, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and RTI International developed the Chronic Disease Cost Calculator, which was used to estimate the Medicaid costs below. 

 Heart Disease

 $28.6 million

 Hypertension

 $84.4 million

 Stroke

 $56.3 million

 Congestive Heart Failure

 $11.9 million

 

New Mexico Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Initiatives

New Mexico State Highlights

  • Heart disease and stroke are priority health issues in New Mexico. In June 2009, the New Mexico Department of Health and the Chronic Disease and Prevention Bureau published a comprehensive report in on the burden of heart disease and stroke in New Mexico. Also published in December 2008, was an At-A-Glance Facts and Figures report on cardiovascular disease burden in New Mexico.   

  • The New Mexico Healthier Weight Council is implementing "The New Mexico Plan to Promote Healthier Weight"  to improve nutrition, increase physical activity, and address health disparities and other contributing factors among New Mexicans. 

State Laws and Policies

Public Awareness of Heart Disease and Stroke

NM HM 13/NM SM 29 (2010, adopted) – Recognizes February 4, 2010 as “Wear Red Day” in New Mexico and urges all citizens to wear red to show support for women and the fight against heart disease.

NM HM 14 (2009, adopted) - Proclaims February 6, 2009 as "Wear Red Day" at the House of Representatives.

HM7/SM20 (2008) - Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of New Mexico that, in recognition of the importance of the ongoing fight against heart disease and stroke, Friday, February 1, 2008, be proclaimed "Wear Red Day" at the House of Representatives/Senate. Be it further resolved that all New Mexicans be encouraged to show their support for women and the fight against heart disease by commemorating this day by wearing the color red.

Prevention of Risk Factors (Nutrition, Physical Activity, Tobacco)

Tobacco Control

New Mexico's state employee tobacco cessation program meets all three of the CDC guidelines that include:

1) Coverage for at least four counseling sessions of at least 30 minutes; YES
2) Access to smoking cessation agents, including prescriptions and nicotine replacement; YES
3) Counseling and medication coverage for at least two quit attempts annually; YES 

  • New Mexico also has a cigarette excise tax and quit line.  The cigarette excise tax in New Mexico is $.91.

  • New Mexico's state Medicaid tobacco cessation program covers over-the-counter and prescription products, therapy, counseling and social support.

  • New Mexico state law requires that all health insurance plans offering maternity benefits in the state cover smoking cessation treatment.  Regulation specifies coverage for diagnostic services, two 90 day cources of prescription medications per year and individual or group counseling.  These benefits can be subject to normal deductibles and coinsurance.  Coverage is not required for over-the-counter medications.

Increase Early Detection and Treatment of Heart Disease and Stroke

SB165 (2008) - The following amounts are appropriated from the general fund to the Department of Health for expenditure in fiscal year 2009 for the purposes specified and, unless otherwise indicated, any unexpended or unencumbered balance of the appropriations remaining at the end of fiscal year 2009 shall revert to the general fund [including] ten thousand dollars ($10,000) to establish a cardiovascular disease prevention program. The following amounts are appropriated from the general fund to the Local Government Division of the Department of Finance and Administration for expenditure in fiscal year 2009 for the purposes specified and, unless otherwise indicated, any unexpended or unencumbered balance of the appropriations remaining at the end of fiscal year 2009 shall revert to the general fund:[including] fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) for a preventive health pilot program in rural areas of northwestern New Mexico that works to identify and improve the health of persons suffering from diabetes, heart disease, obesity or other preventable health conditions.

State Employee Health and Wellness

New Mexico: ACLU sues over New Mexico domestic partner retiree health insurance.2/5/07.

DOMESTIC PARTNER BENEFITS AND TREATMENT 
New Mexico has "a law, policy, court decision or union contract that provide state employees with domestic partner benefits."  Normally health care is covered by the term "benefits." (Human Rights Campaign, 05/06). 

Improve Quality of Care and Access to Care

HJM15 (2007) - Native Americans in New Mexico and across the nation experience the highest rates of cancer, obesity, diabetes and heart disease, yet are adversely affected by limited access to health care due to chronic underfunding of the Indian Health Service. Be it resolved by the Legislature of the State of Mexico that it urge Congress and the president of the United States to prioritize the reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act early in the first session of the one hundred tenth Congress. Be it further resolved that it support the addition of the city of Albuquerque to the list of demonstration projects in order to support vital health care services serving urban Native Americans. Be it further resolved that it support language in a reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act to encourage state-Indian health service partnerships to provide eligibility to workers in rural areas. Be it further resolved that it support providing access to residential treatment centers for Native American youth and adolescents close to their homes on reservations in light of the alarming rates of substance abuse and suicide within this population in New Mexico.

Address and Eliminate Disparities

No policy listed at this time

 

Emergency Medical System (EMS) and Automated External Defibrillators (AED)

SB471 (2008) - Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1 of this act, upon certification by the Property Control Division of the General Services Department that the need exists for the issuance of the bonds, the following amounts are appropriated to the capital program fund for the following purposes [including] forty thousand dollars ($40,000) to purchase, install and replace automatic defibrillation units for Chaves County; and seventeen thousand dollars ($17,000) to purchase defibrillators and an ambulance cot for the police department and rescue unit in Bosque Farms in Valencia County.

NMSA 24-10C/HB639 (2007) - A person who acquires an automated external defibrillator shall ensure that: A. a physician medical director oversees all aspects of the automated external defibrillator program, including training, emergency medical services coordination, protocol approval and automated external defibrillator deployment strategies; B. the trained targeted responder receives appropriate training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and in the use of an automated external defibrillator by a nationally recognized course in cardiopulmonary response and automated external defibrillator use; C. the defibrillator is maintained and tested according to the manufacturer's guidelines; D. any person who renders emergency care or treatment on a person in cardiac arrest by using an automated external defibrillator activates the emergency medical system as soon as possible and reports any clinical use of the automated external defibrillator to the physician medical director; E. the automated external defibrillator program is registered with the department; and F. the local emergency medical services and local 911 agencies have been notified of the automated external defibrillator program. The following persons who render emergency care or treatment by the use of an automated external defibrillator pursuant to the provisions of the Cardiac Arrest Response Act shall not be subject to civil liability, provided that they have acted with reasonable care and in compliance with the requirements of that act: A. a physician who provides supervisory services pursuant to the Cardiac Arrest Response Act; B. a person who provides training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillation; C. a person who acquires an automated external defibrillator pursuant to the Cardiac Arrest Response Act; D. the owner of the property or facility where the automated external defibrillator is located; E. the trained targeted responder; and F. a good Samaritan.

NMSA 61-14D-10-13/HB309 (2005) - The board shall issue a license to practice as an athletic trainer to any person who files a completed application, accompanied by the required fees and documentation and who submits satisfactory evidence that the applicant: A. has completed a baccalaureate degree; B. is currently competent in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and in the use of automated electrical defibrillator units; and C. demonstrates professional competence by passing the national certification examination recognized by the board and an examination on New Mexico laws and regulations pertaining to athletic trainers prescribed by the board. A. Each licensee shall renew his license annually by submitting a renewal application on a form provided by the board. B. The board may require proof of continuing education, current cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification and certification in the use of automated electrical defibrillator units as a requirement for renewal.

NMSA 24-10B-4 (2003) - The bureau is designated as the lead agency for the emergency medical services system, including injury prevention, and shall establish and maintain a program for regional planning and development, improvement, expansion and direction of emergency medical services throughout the state, including: adoption of rules to establish a cardiac arrest targeted response program pursuant to the Cardiac Arrest Response Act [24-10C-1 NMSA 1978], including registration of automated external defibrillator programs, maintenance of equipment, data collection, approval of automated external defibrillator training programs and a schedule of automated external defibrillator program registration fees.

SB1 (2002) - This bill is making general appropriations and authorizing expenditures by state agencies required by law. It appropriates $100,000 to the Department of Health for automatic external defibrillators in state buildings. The appropriation is from the tobacco settlement program fund.

Stroke Systems of Care

SB415 (2006) - The following amounts are appropriated from the general fund to the Department of Health for expenditure in fiscal year 2007 for the purposes specified, and any unexpended or unencumbered balance of the appropriations remaining at the end of fiscal year 2007 shall revert to the general fund [including] one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) to develop and maintain stroke centers in hospitals statewide, promote stroke prevention and treatment protocols, develop a stroke registry and develop a public education campaign.

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