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Childhood Obesity 2007

Childhood Obesity | 2007 Update of Legislative Policy Options

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Updated December 2007

Childhood obesity remains a pressing public health concern. Currently, 66 million Americans are overweight or obese. Over the past three decades, obesity rates have nearly tripled for children ages 2 to 5 (from 5 percent to 14 percent), more than tripled for youth ages 12 to 19 (from 5 percent to 17 percent), and more than quadrupled for children ages 6 to 11 (from 4 percent to 19 percent). Currently, 17.1 percent of children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are overweight (9 million children), and almost 30 percent do not exercise three or more days per week.    

Being overweight puts children and teenagers at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes, risk factors for heart disease at an earlier age, and other health conditions including asthma, sleep apnea, and psychosocial effects such as decreased self-esteem. In one large study, 61 percent of overweight 5- to 10-year-olds already had at least one risk factor for heart disease, and 26 percent had two or more risk factors for the disease. There is a 70 percent chance that an overweight adolescent will be overweight or obese as an adult. By adulthood, obesity-associated chronic diseases – heart disease, some cancers, stroke, diabetes – are the first, second, third, and sixth leading U.S. causes of death.

Moreover, obesity is costly.  Annual obesity-attributable U.S. medical expenses were estimated at $75 billion for 2003. Taxpayers fund about half of this through Medicare and Medicaid.  Fortunately, healthy eating and a physically active lifestyle can help children and adults achieve and maintain a healthy weight and reduce obesity-related chronic diseases.

In 2007, legislatures continued to be active in considering policy options to address the obesity epidemic. Aiming to start early to prevent the onset of chronic conditions, legislators considered a variety of policy approaches to facilitate opportunities for a healthier diet and more exercise beginning in childhood.


This chart provides an overview of the more prevalent legislative approaches considered or enacted in 2007.  Information on a variety of other policy approaches considered in 2007 follows below the 50-state chart. 

State Legislation on Childhood Obesity Policy Options 2007 School Nutrition Legislation Additional Childhood Obesity Policy Legislation for 2007 Body Mass Index (BMI) Legislation
Diabetes Screening and Management Insurance Coverage for Obesity Prevention and Treatment Trans Fat in School Foods Nutrition Education
Physical Activity or Physical Education in Schools School Wellness Policies Task Forces, Commissions, or Studies Raising Awareness
Taxes and Tax Credits Other links for NCSL resources on legislative and policy options to address obesity      

 

 

State Legislation on Childhood Obesity Policy Options 2007

State

Nutrition Standards for Schools 

 

Nutrition Education

Body Mass Index (BMI) 

Physical Education, Physical Activity or Recess (as noted)  

Trans Fat in School Foods 

Alabama

 

 

 

 

 

Alaska

 

 

 

 

 

Arizona

 

 

 

Considered

 

Arkansas

Enacted

 

 

Enacted - physical education & physical activity

Resolution adopted -recess

 

California

Enacted

Considered

 

Enacted

Enacted

Colorado

Enacted - breakfast program

 

 

Considered

 

Connecticut

 

 

Considered

Considered

 

Delaware

 

 

 

 

 

Florida

Considered

 

 

Enacted

Considered

Georgia

 

 

 

 

 

Hawaii

 

Considered

 

Considered

 

Idaho

 

 

 

 

 

Illinois

 

Considered

 

Considered

 

Indiana

Considered

 

 

 

Considered

Iowa

Considered

Considered

 

Considered

 

Kansas

 

 

Considered

Considered

 

Kentucky

 

 

 

Considered

 

Louisiana

 

 

 

Considered

 

Maine

Considered

 

Considered

Considered

Considered

Maryland

 

 

 

Considered

 

Massachusetts

Considered

Considered

 

 

Considered

Michigan

 

 

 

Considered

 

Minnesota

 

 

 

Considered

 

Mississippi

Enacted

Enacted

Considered

Enacted

Considered

Missouri

Considered

 

 

Considered

Considered

Montana

Considered

 

 

 

 

Nebraska

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada

 

Resolution adopted

 

Resolution adopted

 

New Hampshire

Considered

 

 

Enacted

 

New Jersey

Enacted

Standards also implemented by Agriculture Department

Considered

Considered

Considered

Enacted

New Mexico

 

Considered

 

Enacted

 

New York

Considered

Considered

Enacted

Considered

Considered

North Carolina

Enacted

 

 

 

Enacted

North Dakota

 

 

 

Enacted

 

Ohio

Considered

Considered

 

Considered

Considered

Oklahoma

 

 

 

Enacted

 

Oregon

Enacted

 

 

Enacted - recess

Enacted

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

Resolution adopted

 

Rhode Island

 

 

 

Enacted

 

South Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

South Dakota

 

 

 

 

 

Tennessee

Considered

 

 

Considered

Considered

Texas

Considered

Standards also implemented by Agriculture Department

Considered

Enacted

 Enacted

 

Utah

 

 

 

 

 

Vermont

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia

Considered

Considered

Considered

Considered

Considered

Washington

 

 

 

Considered

 

West Virginia

Considered

 

 

 

 

Wisconsin

 

 

 

 

 

Wyoming

 

Considered

 

 

 

 Data Source: National Conference of State Legislatures

 

 

School Nutrition Legislation

In 2007, at least 21 states considered some type of school nutrition legislation: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.  Of those states, at least eight enacted new or additional policies designed to help ensure that students have access to healthier food and beverage options at school.  Enacting states were Arkansas, Colorado, California, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon and Rhode Island.  Enacted legislation is summarized below.

Summaries of Enacted 2007 School Nutrition Legislation:

Arkansas
AR HB 2255 (2007, enacted, Act 1590) Provides flexibility for public school districts in national school lunch program student categorical funding.

California
CA SB 80 (2007, enacted, Chapter 174, Statutes of 2007) - Requires schools and school districts, commencing with the 2007–08 fiscal year, for meals and food items sold or served as part of a free or reduced-price meal program, to comply with specified nutrition-related prohibitions and requirements. Prohibits food items containing artificial trans fats and items that have been deep fried, flash fried or par fried. Encourages schools to meet developmentally and programmatically appropriate meal pattern and meal planning requirements developed by the USDA or menu planning options of Shaping Health as Partners in Education developed by the state (SHAPE California network).

CA SB 490 (2007, enacted, Chapter 648, Statutes of 2007) - Prohibits K-12 schools from making food containing artificial trans fat available to pupils in vending machines or school food service establishments. Prohibits the use of artificial trans fat in the preparation of a food item served to pupils. Excludes food provided as part of a USDA meal program.

Colorado
CO SB 59 (2007, enacted) - Creates the start smart nutrition program and fund to eliminate the reduced price paid by children who are eligible for reduced price breakfasts under the federal "National School Lunch Act".  Appropriates funds for the start smart nutrition program.

Mississippi
MS SB 2369 (2007, enacted) - Enacts the Mississippi Healthy Students Act in support of school wellness policies. Provides that beginning with the 2008-2009 school year, local school wellness plans shall promote increased physical activity, healthy eating habits and abstinence from use of tobacco or illegal drugs.  Among other provisions, directs the state board of education to adopt regulations addressing healthy food and beverage choices, healthy food preparation, marketing of healthy food choices to students and staff; food preparation ingredients and products, availability of food items during lunch and breakfast periods, minimum and maximum time allotments for student and staff lunch and breakfast periods, and methods to increase participation in the child nutrition and school breakfast and lunch programs.  Requires the state superintendent of public instruction to appoint an advisory committee to assist in developing the regulations.  Changes the statutory duties of local school health councils from permissive to mandatory.

New Jersey
NJ SB 1218, AB 883 - identical (2006-2007, enacted, Public Law 2007, Chapter 45) - Establishes certain nutritional restrictions on food and beverages served, sold or given away to pupils in public and certain nonpublic schools. Prohibits serving, selling or giving away as a free promotion anywhere on school property at any time before the end of the school day, or in the reimbursable After School Snack Program: (1) Foods of minimal nutritional value, as defined by the United States Department of Agriculture; (2) All food and beverage items listing sugar, in any form, as the first ingredient; and (3) All forms of candy as defined by the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. Directs schools to reduce the purchase of any products containing trans fats beginning September 1, 2007.

North Carolina
NC HB 1473 (2007, enacted) - This budget bill includes school nutrition standards requiring the State Board of Education, in direct consultation with a cross section of local directors of child nutrition services, to establish statewide nutrition standards for school meals, a la carte foods and beverages, and items served in the After School Snack Program administered by the Department of Public Instruction and child nutrition programs of local school administrative units. The nutrition standards will promote gradual changes to increase fruits and vegetables, increase whole grain products, and decrease foods high in total fat, trans fat, saturated fat, and sugar, effective in 2008-2009 for elementary schools, followed by middle and high school implementation.

Oregon
OR HB 2650 (2007, enacted, Chapter 455) -  Specifies minimum standards for food and beverages sold in public schools, prohibits trans fat in school foods. Allows school district boards to adopt more restrictive standards.

Rhode Island
RI HB 5050 (2007, enacted, Chapter 92), SB 81 (2007, enacted, Chapter 80) - Both bills require all Rhode Island senior high schools that sell or distribute beverages and snacks on their premises, including those sold through vending machines, to offer only healthier beverages and snacks effective January 1, 2008.

 

Other school nutrition policy actions in 2007 included: 

  • School Wellness Policies - Beginning with the 2006-2007 school year, federal law requires all schools participating in federal school meals programs--nearly every school district in the country--to develop a local school wellness policy.  Policies must include nutrition guidelines for all foods available on school campuses during the school day, with the goal of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity. (The federal law is the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004, Public Law 108 - 265.)  See below for a summary of state legislation on school wellness policies.
  • Institute of Medicine report - In 2007, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were directed by Congress to review and make recommendations about nutritional standards for the availability, sale, content and consumption
    of school foods. Their work culminated in the April 2007 report "Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: Leading the Way Toward Healthier Youth." This report recommends federal school meals programs as the main source of school nutrition, with opportunities for competitive, a la carte foods limited, if available, to nutritious fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nonfat or low-fat milk and dairy products in accord with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The expert panel issuing the report concluded that following these recommendations would encourage lifelong healthy eating patterns.
  • Regulatory Action - New Jersey implemented school nutrition standards through its department of agriculture under the governor’s direction in 2005, effective for the 2007-2008 school year.  In January 2007, the legislature codified the nutrition standards into law, effective September 1, 2007.

In Texas, a public school nutrition policy became effective August 1, 2004 under the auspices of the state’s agriculture commissioner, who was authorized by the governor to administer the state’s National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and After School Snack Program. 

 

Additional Childhood Obesity Policy Legislation for 2007

As detailed below, states have considered or enacted additional policy approaches to address childhood obesity such as nutrition education or wellness initiatives in schools, body mass index measurement and reporting the information confidentially to parents, providing opportunities for physical activity during the school day, providing information on the nutrition content of school foods, or taxing snack foods with minimal nutritional value.  

The listing of bills below may not be comprehensive, but provides an overview of other policy approaches considered during the 2007 legislative session.  Bill numbers are included, allowing for retrieval of the full bills for further information.

The proposed legislation has not become law, unless otherwise noted.  This document is not intended as an endorsement or recommendation of any specific legislation.  If you have questions, find errors or omissions; please contact the author as listed below.

 

Body Mass Index (BMI) Legislation and Student Fitness Screening 

Two states, New York and Texas, added a student body mass index (BMI) screening requirements in 2007.  New York now requires school entry health certificates to include information about the student's body mass index. Texas requires BMI screening as part of a student risk assessment program for Type 2 diabetes in selected regions of the state.  As of December 2007, states that currently have some type of student BMI reporting requirements in effect are Arkansas, California, Delaware (piloting BMI as part of student fitness testing), Florida, Illinois, Iowa (pilot program to track student height and weight), Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina (phasing in student fitness testing), Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia.  Some of these state requirements are aggregate BMI data reporting requirements, rather than requirements for individual BMI reports to parents. The Arkansas, California, Delaware, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia requirements were enacted legislatively. In Pennsylvania and Florida, state health departments require measuring BMI as part of annual student growth screenings. In Arkansas, the first state to enact BMI legislation in Act 1220 of 2003, legislation was introduced in 2005 and 2007 to repeal the state’s BMI reporting requirement and, in 2007, legislation was enacted to change the frequency of BMI screening from annual to every other year and to give parents discretion to submit a written refusal for their child to participate in BMI screening to the child's school. California enacted legislation in 2003 (AB 766, Cal. Ed. Code §49452.6) that requires non-invasive screening of 7th grade (female) and 8th grade (male) students for type 2 diabetes risk including measurement of body mass index as one of four diabetes risk factors and this pilot program has been renewed to 2008.

Existing BMI requirements as of December 2007 - The following states currently have some type of student BMI reporting or fitness screening in effect:

Arkansas 
AR HB 1173 (2007, enacted) - Changes student BMI screenings to every other year, beginning in kindergarten and then in even numbered grades. Permits any parent to refuse to have their child's body mass index percentile for age assessed and reported, by providing a written refusal to the school.  Exempts students in grades 11 and 12 from BMI requirements. (Arkansas Act 1220 of 2003 required annual body mass index (BMI) screenings for all public school students, with the results reported to parents confidentially by letter via U.S. mail, as part of a more comprehensive approach that halted the increase of childhood obesity in the state.)  Assigns all community health nurses under its supervision to work with schools to assure that body mass index for age assessment protocols are followed by school employees or their designees who conduct body mass index for age assessments and other student health screenings.

California- Individual student BMI is reported to parents via confidential letter as part of a non-invasive diabetes screening pilot program for 7th and 8th graders. California Education Code § 49452.6

Delaware 
DE HB 372 (2006, enacted, Volume Chapter 75:409) - The state is piloting a new law that requires physical fitness testing for students and includes measuring BMI as part of the testing in some local school districts.  The law requires the Department of Education to develop a regulation requiring each local school district and charter school to assess the physical fitness of each student at least once at the elementary, middle and high school level and outlining the grades at which the assessment will be given.  The assessment results are to be provided to the parent, guardian or relative caregiver.  The intent is to provide baseline and periodic updates for each student and his or her parent, guardian or relative caregiver sharing in the knowledge of obesity and other chronic illnesses.

Florida - Florida Statute § 381.0056(5) requires school health services programs administered jointly by the Department of Health and the Department of Education to administer growth and development screening for students.  BMI is encouraged as part of these screenings for all students in 1st, 3rd, 6th and, optionally, 9th grades.

Illinois - Illinois Administrative Code, Title 77, Subchapter i, Part 665, §665.710 and §665.720 requires that the results of a diabetes screening, including body mass index as one indicator of whether a child is overweight, be documented on the certificate of child health examination form for the required school health examination.  

Iowa
IA SB 2124 (2006, enacted, Chapter 135, §135.27) - Establishes a nutrition and physical activity community obesity prevention grant program, contingent upon the receipt of public health funding.  Funding has been allocated as of July 2006.  Pilot program activities in six locations selected to receive grants must include measurement, reporting, and tracking of the height and weight of students in elementary schools.

Missouri - The state's legislatively established Model School Wellness Program, funded by Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization federal grant money, created pilot programs in school districts encouraging students to avoid tobacco use, balance their diets, get regular exercise, and become familiar with chronic conditions resulting from being overweight. A required evaluation after the 2005-2006 school year was to include aggregate data on changes in body mass index and measurement of changing behaviors related to nutrition, physical activity and tobacco use.

New York 
NY AB 4308 (2007, enacted, same as SB 2108 C) - Among other provisions in this budget bill, requires school entry health certificates to include the student's body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters or weight in pounds divided by the square of height in inches multiplied by a conversion factor of 703) and weight status category as defined by the commissioner of health.

Pennsylvania - The state's health department requires school nurses to compute body mass index - height-to-weight ratio - for students in grades one through eight during annual growth screenings. BMI measurement will be required for students in all grades the 2007-2008 school year. Parents receive letters about the BMI results that encourage them to share the information with their family physician.

South Carolina
SC HB 3499 (2005, enacted) - South Carolina's legislature passed the Student Health and Fitness Act in the spring of 2005.  Among other provisions related to student health, nutrition, physical education and fitness, the law requires all K-12 schools in the state to participate in the South Carolina Physical Education Assessment and requires that fitness reports be sent home to parents in the 5th and 8th grades and high school.  Body mass index screening is not specifically mentioned in the legislation.

Tennessee - The state requires reporting student BMI to parents as part of a confidential health report card and providing parents with basic information about what BMI means and what they can do with this information. TN HB 445 enacted 2005, now Public Chapter 194.

Texas 
SB 415 (2007, enacted, Chapter 95, HB1363-identical companion bill) - Establishes a student risk assessment program for type 2 diabetes in certain regions of the state that includes screening of body mass index for students identified by a noninvasive screening as at risk for type 2 diabetes.

West Virginia
WV SB 785 (2006, enacted, Chapter 73) - Changes the state's current BMI measurement policy by requiring that only a scientifically valid sample of students be assessed. Student confidentiality is protected and all body mass index data is reported in aggregate to the governor, the State Board of Education, the Healthy Lifestyles Coalition and the Legislative Oversight Commission on Health and Human Resource Accountability. 

Proposed BMI requirements - States that considered, but did not enact, student body mass index reporting requirements in 2007 include Connecticut, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia.  In 2006, at least six additional state legislatures considered, but did not enact, student body mass index reporting requirements: Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma and Virginia. In 2005, 13 state legislatures considered student body mass index legislation, and two of those states (West Virginia and Tennessee) enacted BMI legislation.  The 11 states that considered, but did not enact, BMI legislation in 2005 were: Alaska, Connecticut, Georgia, Iowa, Maine, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, and Texas.


 

Diabetes Screening and Management at School 

As the number of obese and overweight children continues to rise, Type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes) is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents. As a result, states are beginning to grapple with the health implications of diabetes in children.  Some have passed legislation to require risk screening for the disease at school.  Others have created policies to facilitate responding to diabetic students while limiting the liability of caregivers and schools.

In 2007, legislation to require non-invasive screening, risk analysis or testing of school children for diabetes was enacted in Texas and proposed in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.  Existing law requires non-invasive student diabetes risk screening as a pilot program in California and statewide in Illinois.  Legislation providing for student diabetes care or self-care at school or permitting medication administration by, and/or liability protections for, school personnel responding to diabetic students was enacted in 2007 in Indiana and Virginia and considered in 2007 in Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Tennessee. Laws enacted in 2005 and 2006 in Nebraska, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia also facilitate at-school care for children with type 2 diabetes.  A California lawsuit settlement from August 2007 interprets federal laws that guarantee equal educational opportunities for children with disabilities to require schools to have personnel trained and available to assist diabetic students. State legislation for student diabetes care enacted in 2006 and 2007 is summarized below.

Indiana 
IN HB 1116, (2007, enacted, P.L. 166-2007, Indiana Code 20-34-5 et. seq.) - Requires that a diabetes management and treatment plan be prepared and implemented for a student with diabetes for use during school hours or at a school related activity. The plan must be developed by: (1) the licensed health care practitioner responsible for the student's diabetes treatment; and (2) the student's parent or legal guardian. It must (1) identify the health care services or procedures the student should receive at school; (2) evaluate the student's ability to manage and level of understanding of the student's diabetes; and (3) be signed by the student's parent or legal guardian and the licensed health care practitioner responsible for the student's diabetes treatment.  Establishes a training program for school nurses and for school employees who volunteer to assist students with diabetes in managing and treating the diabetes.

Nebraska
NE LB 1107, (2006, enacted, Section 79-225) - Relates to schools; provides for student self-management of diabetes at school and school-related activities; requires a written request from a parent or guardian; limits school liability.

Tennessee
TN SB 2658, HB 3870 (2006 enacted, Public Act, Chapter 542) - Allows for students with diabetes to perform blood glucose checks, administer insulin, treat hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and otherwise attend to the care and management of the student's diabetes in any area of the school or school grounds and at any school- related activity. Clarifies that students are permitted to possess on the student's person at all times all necessary diabetes monitoring and treatment supplies.

Texas 
SB 415 (2007, enacted, Chapter 95, HB1363-identical companion bill) - Establishes a student risk assessment program for type 2 diabetes in certain regions of the state that includes screening of body mass index for students identified by a noninvasive screening as at risk for type 2 diabetes.

Utah
UT SB 8 (2006 enacted, Session Law Chapter 215) - For the care of students with diabetes in school, directs public schools to train school personnel who volunteer to be trained in the administration of glucagon in an emergency and permits a student to possess or possess and self-administer diabetes medication, when requested by parents.

West Virginia
WV HB 2548 (2006 enacted, Chapter 66) - Relates to the establishment of individual diabetes care plans for students with diabetes by county boards of education; requires the State Board of Education to adopt guidelines for the development and implementation of such plans; requires each county board of education to adopt such a plan meeting those guidelines; requires the state board to report to the Legislature regarding the adoption of the guidelines and the establishment of such plans by county boards.

 

 Insurance Coverage for Obesity Prevention and Treatment

Maryland requires insurers to cover morbid obesity treatment including surgery, while Georgia, Indiana and Virginia require private insurers to offer general coverage for morbid obesity as an option.  No additional laws requiring insurance coverage for obesity prevention or treatment were enacted in 2007, although legislation regarding obesity and insurance coverage was considered in 2007 in at least seven states including Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Utah. Most of this legislation would have provided or strengthened private insurance coverage for obesity prevention or treatment, especially for the morbidly obese (those with a body mass index of 40 or higher), without specific reference to childhood obesity treatment. However, the proposed Illinois legislation would have established a weight loss and management pilot program in partnership with a private entity specializing in weight loss and weight control for individuals enrolled in the state's Covering ALL KIDS health insurance program or the Medicaid program.  Tennessee's proposed law would have required insurers to provide non-obese premium discounts to insureds. Information summaries for those two unique bills are reported below. As of July 2004, Medicare began to recognize obesity as a medical condition, opening the door to greater coverage for obesity treatments demonstrated as scientifically effective.

Illinois
IL SB 468 (2007, proposed) - Would have amended the Covering ALL KIDS Health Insurance Act and the Illinois Public Aid Code to require the Department of Healthcare and Family Services to establish a weight loss and management pilot program in partnership with a private entity that specializes in weight loss and weight control for morbidly individuals enrolled in the Covering ALL KIDS health insurance program or the Medicaid program who demonstrated a commitment to weight loss.

Tennessee
TN HB 2220, SB 2315 (2007, proposed, bills identical, HB 2220 carried over to 2008) - Would have required insurers to provide non-smoking and non-obese premium discounts to insureds and mandated such discounts for state employees.

 

Nutrition Education 

Many states have school health education requirements, but in recent years legislators have considered or enacted bills specifically requiring nutrition education aimed at preventing childhood obesity as a component of school health curriculum.  California, Colorado, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont and West Virginia currently have laws requiring some form of nutrition education in schools. States that enacted nutrition education legislation or resolutions in 2007 include Mississippi and Nevada as summarized below. Other states that considered nutrition education legislation in 2007 include California, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Massachuestts, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Texas, Virginia and Wyoming.

Mississippi
MS SB 2369 (2007, enacted) - Enacts the Mississippi Healthy Students Act in support of school wellness policies. Provides that beginning with the 2008-2009 school year, local school wellness plans shall also promote increased physical activity, healthy eating habits and abstinence from the use of tobacco and illegal drugs through programs that incorporate healthy lifestyle choices into core subject areas. 
 
Nevada
NV SCR 27 (2007, resolution adopted) - Resolves that state agencies, school districts and organizations that provide nutrition education, especially to new and expectant parents and early childhood caregivers, be encouraged to develop a coordinated collaboration to provide appropriate nutrition education to Nevadans to reduce obesity and encourage other healthy lifestyle choices. 

 


Physical Activity or Physical Education in Schools and Recess Legislation

Forty-nine states require physical education in schools, but the scope of the requirement varies greatly.  At least 34 states considered or enacted physical education or physical activity legislation or resolutions in 2007. Enacting states included Arkansas, California, Florida, Mississippi, Nevada (resolution adopted), New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania (resolution adopted), Rhode Island and Texas.  States that considered, but did not enact, new or additional legislation regarding physical education or physical activity in 2007 included Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and Washington.

States also have considered legislation to preserve time for physical activity during the school day through recess.  Both the cost of physical education programs and an emphasis on academics have sometimes been considered barriers to increasing physical education in schools but recognition is growing that physical activity during the school day can increase student achievement.  Physical education and physical activity legislation that was enacted in 2007 is summarized below. Recess legislation is reported separately below.

Arkansas
AR HB 1039 (2007, Act 317) - Sets physical education and physical activity requirements for students. Requires 60 minutes per calendar week of physical education instruction for grades kindergarten through grade 6, and 90 minutes per week of physical activity, which may include physical education, daily recess or intramural sports; requires 60 minutes per week of physical education instruction for students in schools organized to teach any combination of grades 5 through 8 with no additional requirement for physical activity; requires one and one-half units of physical education instruction for graduation for students in grades 9 through 12 with no additional requirement for physical activity.  Elective participation in physical education is not affected by these requirements. School districts may impose additional requirements.

California
CA SB 601 (2007, enacted, Chapter 720, Statutes of 2007) - Existing law requires public schools to provide instruction in physical education for a total period of time of not less than 200 minutes each 10 schooldays to pupils in grades 1 to 6, and for a total period of time of not less than 400 minutes each 10 schooldays to pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive. This bill requires data collection indicating the extent to which each school within the jurisdiction of a school district or county office of education performs its duties regarding physical education instruction, including providing the required minimum minutes of instruction and conducting physical fitness testing.

Florida
FL HB 967 (2007, enacted, Chapter 2007-28) - Requires 150 minutes of physical education each week for students in kindergarten through grade 5. Also requires review and revision of the Sunshine State Standards for physical education to emphasize the role of physical education in promoting the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that prepare students to make healthy lifelong nutrition and physical fitness choices. Further requires the commissioner of education to make prominently available on the department's website links to an internet based clearinghouse for professional development regarding physical education.

Mississippi
MS SB 2369 (2007, enacted) - Enacts the Mississippi Healthy Students Act in support of school wellness policies. Among other provisions, requires the appropriation of sufficient state-source funds for the state department of education to employ a physical activity coordinator to assist school districts in the implementation of physical education programs. Changes the statutory duties of local school health councils from permissive to mandatory. Adopts guidelines for school districts requiring students in kindergarten through Grade 8 to participate in One hundred fifty (150) minutes per week of physical activity-based instruction and 45 minutes per week of health education. Also requires 1/2 Carnegie unit requirement in physical education or physical activity in Grades 9 through 12 for graduation.

Nevada
NV SCR 9 (2007, resolution adopted) - Urges the public schools and school districts in the state to preserve and strive to expand the amount of time allocated for physical education.

New Hampshire
NH HB 927 (2007, enacted, Chapter 270) - Includes physical education as an element of an adequate education.

New Mexico
NM HB 208 (2007, enacted) - Creates a phased-in elementary school physical education program, subject to funding, without time requirements for physical education.

North Dakota
ND SB 2354 (2007, enacted) - Requires availability of high school physical education.

Oklahoma
OK HB 1601 (2007, enacted, OS 70-11-103.9) - Creates the "Fit Kids Physical Education Task Force" regarding school physical education. Requires a report to parents summarizing how physical activity is incorporated into the school day and the benefits of physical education and physical activity. Prohibits recess to count towards physical education requirements.

Oregon
OR HB 3141 (2007, enacted) - Requires school districts, within the next decade, to provide a minimum of 150 minutes per week of physical education in elementary schools and 210 minutes per week in middle schools. Also provides $860,000 for grants to help districts train p.e. teachers and $140,000 for the state Department of Education to gather information from districts about current physical education programs

Pennsylvania
PA HR 244 (2007, resolution adopted) - Observes May 1-7, 2007, as National Physical Education and Sports Week and the month of May 2007 as National Physical Fitness and Sports Month in Pennsylvania.

Rhode Island
RI HB 5900, (2007, enacted, Chapter 224) - Establishes a pilot program to encourage physical exercise and promote healthy weight levels in children; takes effect upon passage. Pilot programs are to incorporate, but not be limited to, a combination of exercise and nutrition plans that may include physical exercise, including walking and jogging, as well as information on healthy food choices.

Texas
TX SB 530, HB 1257-identical (2007, enacted, Public Acts 2007, Chapter ) -  Requires 30 minutes daily of moderate to vigorous physical activity for grades kindergarten through 6, at least four semesters of 30 minutes daily of moderate to vigorous physical activity for grades 6 through 8 for public school students. Also requires each district to assess the physical fitness of students in grades 3 through 12 each year using an instrument adopted by the commissioner of education to assess physical fitness, and to compile the assessment's results and provide a summary, aggregated by grade level and any other category identified by commissioner rule, to the Texas Education Agency.  The summary may not contain the names of individual students or teachers.  Requires the agency to analyze the results and identify, for each district, any correlation between the results and academic achievement, school attendance, student obesity, disciplinary problems, and school meal programs.


Recess Legislation Enacted in 2005-2007 

In 2007, state legislation regarding recess was enacted in Oklahoma, a recess resolution was adopted in Arkansas, and recess legislation or resolutions were considered in Connecticut, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.  All recess legislation enacted from 2005 through 2007 is summarized below. 

Arkansas
AR HR 1023 (2007, resolution adopted) - Urges school districts to provide a mid-morning and mid-afternoon recess of at least ten minutes to all students in kindergarten through grade six.  Recognizes that recess creates a supportive environment for children and allows them to incorporate regular physical activity into their daily lives; recess provides children with discretionary time and opportunities to engage in physical activities that lead to healthy bodies and enjoyment of movement; recess results in enhanced cognitive abilities and facilitates improved attention in the classroom; recess is an essential component in the development of interpersonal communication skills, as it provides an unstructured environment in which children can interact with one another; and recess is an avenue for creativity which in turn leads to the ability to think "outside the box" and develop stronger thinking skills.

Connecticut
CT Senate Substitute Bill 204, (2006, enacted, Public Act 06-44) - Requires the Connecticut department of education to develop guidelines for addressing the physical health needs of students that include, among other things, plans for engaging students in daily physical exercise during regular school hours.  (Note - the bill doesn't use the word "recess" or specify a certain number of minutes.)

 

Indiana
IN SB 111 (2006, enacted, Public Law 54) - Beginning with the 2006-2007 school year, requires the governing body of each school corporation to provide daily physical activity for students in elementary school. The physical activity must be consistent with the curriculum and programs developed under IC 20-19-3-6 and may include the use of recess. On a day when there is inclement weather or unplanned circumstances have shortened the school day, the school corporation may provide physical activity alternatives or elect not to provide physical activity.

Oklahoma
OK HB 1601 (2007, enacted - OS 70-11-103.9) - Creates the "Fit Kids Physical Education Task Force" regarding school physical education. Also strongly encourages school districts to incorporate physical activity into the school day by providing to students in full-day kindergarten and grades one through five at least a twenty-minute daily recess, which shall be in addition to the 60 minutes of required physical education, and by allowing all students brief physical activity breaks throughout the day, physical activity clubs, and special events.Texas
SB 42 (2005, enacted) - Encourages school districts to promote physical activity for children through classroom curricula for health and physical education.  Allows the state board of education, by rule, to require students in kindergarten to grade nine to participate in up to 30 minutes of daily physical activity as part of a school district's physical education curriculum, through structured activity or during a school's daily recess. Provides for consultation with educators, parents, and medical professionals to develop physical activity requirements.

South Carolina
HB 3499 (2005, enacted, Act 102) - As part of bill phasing in physical education standards statewide, provides that each elementary school shall designate a physical education teacher to serve as its physical education activity director. The physical education activity director shall plan and coordinate opportunities for additional physical activity for students that exceed the designated weekly student physical education instruction times that may include, but not be limited to, before, during, and after school dance instruction, fitness trail programs, intramural programs, bicycling programs, walking programs, recess, and activities designed to promote physical activity opportunities in the classroom. 


School Wellness Policies

 

 

The federal Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 (Public Law 108 - 265) required each local school district participating in the National School Lunch and/or Breakfast Program to establish a local wellness policy by the beginning of the 2006-2007 school year. School districts were required to involve a broad group of stakeholders in developing wellness policies and set goals for nutrition education, physical activity, campus food provision, and other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness. Plans for measuring policy implementation were required to be included. In 2007, statewide legislation in support of wellness policies was enacted in Mississippi and considered in at least five other states including Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Ohio and Washington as summarized below. Previously, during 2006, at least eight states, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Tennessee have enacted state-level legislation related to wellness policies. Legislators also have acted on individual policies that are part of school wellness goals, such as improving the nutritional quality of school foods, providing greater opportunities for physical activity, and ensuring that adequate nutrition education is part of the school curriculum, as reported separately on this web page. Additional information about federal wellness policy requirements can be found on the U.S. Department of Agriculture web site at:

Florida
FL SB 2370 (2007, proposed) -  Would have revised the requirement for each school district's review of its wellness policy and physical education policy; would have provided specific guidelines for district wellness and physical education policies regarding nutrition education, physical activity, and nutritional guidelines for foods sold and served on campus; would have required superintendents to report to the department of education on school district compliance.

Massachusetts
MA HB 403 (2007, proposed) - Would have directed school committees to establish local school health education advisory councils to ensure that local community values are reflected in health education instruction and wellness programs.

MA HB 483 (2007, proposed) - Would have directed the Board of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Public Health to require school districts to convene a School Wellness Advisory Committee to develop and recommend a policy addressing school nutrition, nutrition education and physical activity, to be reviewed every three years.- Requires an annual report on each school's compliance with the state's minimum physical education time and fitness testing requirements. Clarifies exemptions for grades 10-12 when students pass fitness test but requires elective physical education in high school.

Minnesota
MN HF 420, HF1006 & SF382 (all similar, 2007, proposed) - Would have provided for statewide health and physical education requirements; required schools and school districts to annually transmit locally approved school wellness policies to the department of education and department web site posting of policies; would have established a grant program to assist local schools and school districts to implement wellness policies in conformance with federal law; and would have made an appropriation.

Mississippi
MS SB 2369 (2007, enacted) - Enacts the Mississippi Healthy Students Act in support of school wellness policies. Provides that beginning with the 2008-2009 school year, local school wellness plans shall promote increased physical activity, healthy eating habits and abstinence from use of tobacco or illegal drugs.  Directs the state board of education to adopt regulations addressing healthy food and beverage choices, healthy food preparation, marketing of healthy food choices to students and staff; food preparation ingredients and products, availability of food items during lunch and breakfast periods, minimum and maximum time allotments for student and staff lunch and breakfast periods, and methods to increase participation in the child nutrition and school breakfast and lunch programs.  Requires the appropriation of sufficient state-source funds for the state department of education to employ a physical activity coordinator to assist school districts in the implementation of physical education programs. Changes the statutory duties of local school health councils from permissive to mandatory.

Ohio
OH HB 254 (2007, proposed) - Would have created the Ohio Child Wellness Advisory Council, established nutritional standards for certain foods and beverages sold in public and chartered nonpublic schools, required public and chartered nonpublic schools to implement local wellness policies, and made other changes.

Washington
WA HB 1991 (2007, proposed) - Would have required the state department of health to draft a strategic plan by 2010 to decrease obesity rates in children and adults by ten percent, in consultation with physicians, health professionals, school educators, worksite wellness and employee benefits counselors, athletic trainers in schools, and professional athletes and trainers. 
 

Raising Awareness

Many states, in 2007, sought to raise public awareness of childhood obesity, related health conditions such as diabetes, and efforts to respond to the problem with wellness, nutrition, and physical activity initiatives.  Enacted bills and resolutions from California, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin are listed below.  This list may not be completely comprehensive.

California
CA SCR 18 (2007, resolution adopted, Resolution Chapter 25) - Proclaims the month of May 2007, as California Fitness Month, and encourages all Californians to enrich their lives through proper diet and exercise.

CA SCR 28 (2007, resolution adopted, Resolution Chapter 37) - Recognizes the importance of quality youth sports experiences, as well as the important role that local park and recreation agencies play in providing safe and enjoyable youth sports, and their role in addressing the state's childhood obesity epidemic and related health
conditions and associated costs.

Louisiana
LA HB 883 (2007, enacted, Act 418) - Provides for the powers, duties, and functions of the Louisiana Diabetes Initiatives Council including raising awareness of the prevalence of diabetes; promoting that nutrition, body weight, and lifestyle risk factors are strongly linked to the development of diabetes and can complicate its management; stressing the importance of testing, screening, and measuring treatment goals; educating individuals about the signs and symptoms of diabetes; identifying cardiovascular disease risk factors for people with diabetes; and advocating the benefits of moderate weight loss.

New Mexico
NM HM 21, NM SM 78 (2007, identical resolutions adopted by house and senate) - Expresses support for continued funding of the Indian health services special diabetes program for Native Americans and urges Congress and the president to fund the program beyond 2008 to support the purposes and practices of culturally appropriate diabetes prevention and treatment within the Native American communities in New Mexico.

Oklahoma
OK HCR 1022 (2007, resolution adopted) - Designates March 26, 2007, as Diabetes Awareness Day in the State of Oklahoma. Affirms that the State of Oklahoma is committed to becoming the nation’s model to conduct cutting-edge research related to diabetes and its complications, in promoting education in matters related to diabetes and its prevention, and to providing optimal treatment for individuals with diabetes.

Pennsylvania 
PA HR 386 (2007, resolution adopted) - Encourages individuals to seek early screening and early treatment of diabetic conditions and health care providers to improve care to better control diabetes. Commends the Governor for his diabetes initiatives.

Tennessee 
TN HJR 258 (2007, resolution adopted) - Expresses concern for identification and treatment of diabetes.

Texas 
SR 820 (2007, resolution adopted) - Commends the members of the Texas Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation for their dedication to fund research and support policies to find a cure for juvenile diabetes. 

Virginia 
VA HJ 726ER (2007, resolution adopted by house and senate) - Designates the third week, in September in 2007 and in each succeeding year, as Healthy Virginians/Healthy Students Week in Virginia.

Washington
WA SR 8615 (2007, enacted, Chapter 239) - Recognizes Diabetes Day at the capitol and encourages individuals to seek early screening and early treatment, and health care providers to improve care, for the control of diabetes and the treatment of major complications, to reduce the rate of diabetes and its complications among high-risk populations.   Encourages adoption of generally recognized clinical practice guidelines such as the American Diabetes Association goals, recommendations, and standards that identify the reduction of body mass index, cardiovascular risk issues, and glycemic control as key factors to managing diabetes.

Wisconsin 
WI AJR 75, SJR 65 (2007, resolution adopted by house and senate) - Formally recognizes November as Diabetes Awareness Month in Wisconsin and recognizes the work and success of the Wisconsin Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (WDPCP) in educating citizens and health providers about diabetes and the latest diagnosis, treatment, and control guidelines, while urging continued funding for the program.

 

Task Forces, Commissions, Studies, Grants and Other Special Programs

Legislation or resolutions to create obesity-related task forces, commissions, studies, strategic plans or other special programs were introduced in at least 11 states in 2007. Enacted legislation or resolutions for 2007 are reported below, including actions by legislatures in Alabama, Georgia, North Dakota, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin.

Alabama
AL HJR 306 (2007, resolution adopted) - Establishes a legislative task force on morbid obesity to study the feasibility of implementing a pilot program to increase the funding formula of the State Employees' Health Insurance Plan and the Public Education Employees' Health Insurance Plan for bariatric surgery in the morbidly obese as a treatment option in an effort to reduce the financial and clinical burden of morbid obesity upon the citizens of Alabama and study the long-term cost of coverage for morbid obesity versus the cost of bariatric surgery.

Georgia
GA SR 517 (2007, resolution adopted) - Creates a Senate Study Committee on Childhood Obesity and Diabetes in Georgia, composed of five members of the Senate, appointed by the President of the Senate.

 

North Dakota
HCR 3046 (2007, resolution adopted) - Directs the Legislative Council to study ways in which various public and private entities can cooperate with families to promote healthy lifestyles for children and create awareness about the interplay of healthy lifestyle choices and educational success. Recognizes that choices that a child makes regarding diet, exercise, and substance use impact the child's overall well-being and success in an educational environment; and that smart choices help to alleviate a variety of conditions, including obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, osteoporosis, and cancer; and parents, teachers, health care professionals, and representatives of public and private entities can provide useful information and guidance to children as they learn to evaluate their many choices.

Texas
TX SB 556 (2007, enacted, Chapter 114) - Creates an interagency obesity council composed of the commissioner of agriculture, commissioner of state health
services, and commissioner of education, or a staff member designated by each of those commissioners, to meet at least once a year to: discuss the status of each agency’s programs that promote better health and nutrition and prevent obesity among children and adults; consider the feasibility of tax incentives for employers who promote activities designed to reduce obesity in the workforce; and, every other year, submit a report to the governor, the lieutenant governor, and the speaker of the house of representatives on the activities of the council during the preceding two calendar years and recommending program improvements, goals or legislation.

Virginia 
VA HJ 637 (2007, resolution adopted) -Establishes a joint subcommittee to study childhood obesity in Virginia's public schools. The joint subcommittee shall ascertain methods of combating childhood obesity in Virginia public schools and examine the relationship between the health and physical education curriculum; public health policies; social, economic, and cultural influences; and media messages; and the incidence of overweight and obese students in the public schools.

Wisconsin 
WI SR 3 (2007, resolution adopted) - Encourages public and private employers to establish and promote healthful lifestyle programs and encourages economic incentives to stimulate the widespread adoption of such programs.

 

Taxes and Tax Credits

States continue to consider a variety of fiscal options to encourage healthy lifestyles.  In 2007 considered tax credits for fitness or wellness choices as well as taxing foods and beverages with minimal nutritional value and, in a few states, directing the revenues to fund obesity or health-related services or programs.  A number of proposed healthy lifestyles fiscal bills for 2007 are reported below to give an overview of state efforts, but none were enacted. This listing may not be comprehensive.

Illinois
IL HB 3584 (2007, proposed) -  Would have created an individual income tax credit for individual taxpayers who, during the taxable year, paid costs for an eligible child to enroll in a qualified physical-fitness program.

Maryland
MD HB 39 (2007, proposed) - Would have provided that a specified exemption under the sales and use tax for specified sales of food would not apply to specified snack food; repealing an exemption under the sales and use tax for specified snack food sold through vending machines.

New York
NY SB 2595 (2007, proposed) - Would have provided a tax credit to businesses for qualified expenses relating to occupational wellness of up to two hundred dollars per employee, not to exceed ten thousand dollars per employer. 

Pennsylvania
PA SB 1041 (2007, proposed) - Among other provisions would have have excluded soft drinks and foods sold at snack bars for human consumption from the state's sales tax exemption for food.

Wisconsin
WI AB 235 (2007, proposed) - Would have created an income and franchise tax credit for workplace wellness programs, equal to 30 percent of the amount that an employer paid in the taxable year to provide a workplace wellness program.  Defined a workplace wellness program as a health or fitness program, as defined by administrative rule by the Department of Commerce, that is provided with health risk assessments.


Trans Fat in School Foods 

 

A number of states have recently considered or enacted legislation to restrict or prohibit school foods that contain trans fat or to otherwise specify the nutritional composition of school foods.  In 2007, at least four states, California, New Jersey, North Carolina and Oregon, enacted bills to limit or ban the use of trans fat in school foods. At least ten additional states considered, but did not enact, legislation in 2007 regarding trans fat in school foods including Florida, Indiana (would have removed healthy foods exemption for foods sold after school or at fundraisers), Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Tennessee and Virginia. Legislation enacted in 2006 or 2007 regarding trans fat in school foods is summarized below. This listing does not include legislation to require nutrition labeling or menu information for food and drink items in all chain restaurants or retail food establishments or to restrict or ban trans fat in restaurant foods, which can be found on NCSL's trans fat and menu labeling legislation web page.                           

 

California
CA SB 80 (2007, enacted, Chapter 174) - Requires schools and school districts, commencing with the 2007–08 fiscal year, for meals and food items sold or served as part of a free or reduced-price meal program, to comply with specified nutrition-related prohibitions and requirements. Prohibits food items containing artificial trans fats and items that have been deep fried, flash fried or par fried. Encourages schools to meet developmentally and programmatically appropriate meal pattern and meal planning requirements developed by the USDA or menu planning options of Shaping Health as Partners in Education developed by the state (SHAPE California network).

 

CA SB 132 (2007, enacted, Chapter 730) - As a condition of receipt of funds pursuant to Section 49430.5, commencing with the 2007-08 fiscal year, for meals and food items sold as part of the free and reduced-price meal programs, a school or school district shall not sell or serve a food item artificial trans fats or items that have been deep fried, flash fried or par fried. Prohibited oils and fats include, but are not limited to, palm, coconut, palm kernel, lard, typically solid at room temperature and are known to negatively impact cardiovascular health. Oils permitted by this provision include, but are not limited to, canola, safflower, sunflower, corn, olive, soybean, peanut, or a blend of these oils, typically liquid at room temperature and are known for their positive cardiovascular benefit.

CA SB 490 (2007, enacted, Chapter 648) - Prohibits K-12 schools from making food containing artificial trans fat available to pupils in vending machines or school food service establishments. Prohibits the use of artificial trans fat in the preparation of a food item served to pupils. Excludes food provided as part of a USDA meal program.

Indiana
IN SB 111 (2006, enacted, Public Law 54) - Requires at least 50 percent of food items sold in schools to qualify as "better food choices" and, among other definitions, specifies that better food choices are those in which (A) Not more than 30 percent of their total calories are from fat. (B) Not more than 10 percent of their total calories are from saturated and trans fat. (C) Not more than 35 percent of their weight is from sugars that do not occur naturally in fruits, vegetables, or dairy products.

New Jersey
NJ SB 1218,  AB 883 - identical (2006-2007, enacted, Public Law 2007, Chapter 45) - Establishes certain nutritional restrictions on foods and beverages served, sold or given away to pupils in public and certain nonpublic schools. Requires that based on manufacturers' nutritional data or nutrient facts labels, school foods contain no more than eight grams of total fat per serving, with the exception of nuts and seeds, and no more than two grams of saturated fat per serving.  Among its provisions, the new law states: "Schools shall reduce the purchase of any products containing trans fats beginning September 1, 2007."

North Carolina
NC HB 1473 (2007, enacted) - A child nutrition program standards provision in this appropriations bill requires the state board of education, in consultation with a cross section of local directors of child nutrition services, to establish statewide nutrition standards for school meals, a la carte foods and beverages, and items served in the after school snack program administered by the Department of Public Instruction and child nutrition programs of local school administrative units. The nutrition standards are to promote gradual changes to increase fruits and vegetables, increase whole grain products, and decrease foods high in total fat, trans fat, saturated fat, and sugar. Standards are to be implemented initially in elementary schools, with all elementary schools required to achieve a basic level by the end of the 2008-2009 school year, followed by middle schools and then high schools.

Oregon
OR HB 2650 (2007, enacted, Chapter 455) - Among other provisions specifying school food standards, prohibits the sale of snack items at school that contain more than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving.

Other links for NCSL resources on legislative and policy options to address obesity are:

Nutrition, Physical Activity & Obesity Page
http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/wellnesspolicy.html

Please contact Amy Winterfeld, NCSL, Health Program, to report any comments or corrections to this document.

 

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