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Financial Disclosure

Financial Disclosure

INCOME DISCLOSURE

cashAll but three states require legislators to disclose information about their outside income. Actual amounts need not be reported, but many states have a monetary threshold or list amount categories. This 50 state chart lists disclosure requirements for legislators' income, occupations, business relationships, and property.

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GIFTS AND HONORARIA

gift boxesMany states require that legislators disclose the receipt of gifts and honoraria. This reporting requirement can extend to certain members of an official's family, but not always. One state may ban honoraria, while another requires only that its receipt is reported. This 50-state chart provides detail on these disclosures.

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CLIENT IDENTIFICATION

meetingOver half the states do not require legislators to disclose information about clients and those that do often have caveats accompanying the provision. Discover which states mandate the disclosure of these relationships by viewing our compilation of statutes.

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LEGISLATOR RELATIONSHIPS

citizens Other disclosures required of legislators concern the relationships they have with others. Click below to view 50 state data on state connections, lobbyist connections and creditor/debtor requirements.

 

HOUSEHOLD MEMBER INFORMATION

familyNearly all states require that legislators disclose some income-related information about certain family and household members. Often this means information about one's spouse, but it can also mean dependent children, persons living with the legislator, or "anyone receiving income for the benefit of the legislator."

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E-DISCLOSURE AND ONLINE ACCESS

iphone ipadAll states that require financial disclosure make some information available online. Nearly half the states allow for e-filing and others provide the public with online access to completed forms. Read this September 2013 LegisBrief to get caught up on the issue.

 

OVERVIEW | FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

Personal financial disclosure laws require public servants to reveal information about their finances, relationships, professions and income. Many elected and appointed office-holders at the local, state and federal level must abide by versions of these provisions, which are different from campaign finance disclosures. All but three states - Idaho, Michigan and Vermont - require state legislators to file personal financial disclosures, also called statements of economic interest. Most states require lawmakers to state their occupation, the sources of their income, the names of corporations in which they hold a position such as director or officer, the addresses of their property, the names of creditors and debtors and names of businesses in which they hold a financial interest. On this page find 50 state information on the following topics: client identification requirements; creditor and debtor requirements; criminal penalties for public corruption or violation of ethics laws; gift and honorarium requirements and restrictions; household member requirements; income requirements; lobbyist connections;  and state connections.

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