Transportation Energy for the Future: A Guide for Policymakers

12/31/2015

trafficOil provides the nation with 95 percent of the energy used in the transportation sector. The remaining 5 percent is provided mainly by biofuels. Natural gas and a very small but growing amount of electricity also power a portion of the nation’s vehicles.

Light trucks and passenger vehicles consume about 67 percent of the transportation energy, while heavy-duty trucks use about 16 percent. A growing population and the need to move more goods are expected to increase transportation energy demand by 17 percent by 2035, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The rate of growth is expected to be just half that of the previous 25 years, due in part to increasing efficiency.

Although energy demand for light-duty cars and trucks is forecast to grow just 10 percent, energy demand for heavy-duty vehicles, such as freight trucks and buses, is expected to jump by nearly 50 percent. These forecasts are based on current policy, which requires cars to average 37.5 miles per gallon and light trucks to average 28.8 miles per gallon by 2016.

Table of Contents
  • List of Figures
  • Acknowledgments
  • NCSL Task Force on Energy Supply
  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction and Overview
  • Petroleum
  • Biofuels
  • Natural Gas
  • Diesel Technology
  • Electric Vehicles
  • Transportation Fuels: Policy Options.
    • Petroleum
    • Biofuels.
    • Natural Gas
    • Diesel Technology
    • Electric Vehicles