2019 Post-Election Results

11/6/2019

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Election Day 2019 is in the rearview mirror now.

Voters in Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia voted on regularly scheduled legislative elections and statewide offices on Nov. 5, and voters in Louisiana followed suit on Nov. 16.

On the tabs below, you’ll find updated maps on legislative control and state control (which includes both legislative chambers and the governors), and all the details on this year’s statewide ballot measures. Visit the NCSL Blog for additional news on both legislative races and ballot measures.

In brief, a total of 538 of the nation’s 7,383 legislative seats were decided. The big news from this year’s elections is that both chambers in Virginia flipped from Republican control to Democratic control. As expected, in New Jersey, both chambers stayed in Democratic hands, and in  Louisiana and Mississippi, both chambers stayed in Republican hands. Click on the Legislative Control tab below to see what these elections may mean for partisan control of the nation’s legislatures.

Governors in Kentucky, Louisiana and Mississippi also were on the ballot this fall. In Kentucky, the Democrat challenger, Andy Beshear, ousted the Republican incumbent governor, Matt Bevin. In Mississippi, the Republican lt. governor, Tate Reeves, will succeed term-limited Governor Phil Bryant. And on Nov. 16, the Democrat incumbent, John Bel Edwards, retained his seat. The State Control tab will provide information about those races, and what these races mean for overall political control of states.

Voters in seven states weighed in on a total of 20 statewide ballot measures that address taxes, criminal justice and more. Choose the Ballot Measures tab to see the results as they come in.

For more information, contact John Mahoney about legislative and state control and Wendy Underhill about ballot measures.

 

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Post-Election Legislative Control AK WA MT ND NH VT NY MI MN WI OH PA CT NJ RI MA NV OR ID WY SD IA IL IN MO NE HI CO TN AR KS UT CA DE MD WV KY FL SC TX DC AL MS LA OK AZ NC ME VA NM GA PR GU VI AS MP
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

State Map

Click on a state to see the partisan breakdown by chamber.

LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Alabama

SENATE HOUSE
R: 27 R: 77
D: 8 D: 28
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Alaska

SENATE HOUSE
R: 13 R: 23
D: 7 D: 16
I: 0 I: 1
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

American Samoa

SENATE
Nonpartisan: 18
HOUSE
Nonpartisan: 21
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Arizona

SENATE HOUSE
R: 17 R: 31
D: 13 D: 29
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Arkansas

SENATE HOUSE
R: 26 R: 75
D: 9 D: 25
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

California

SENATE HOUSE
R: 11 R: 19
D: 29 D: 61
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Colorado

SENATE HOUSE
R: 16 R: 24
D: 19 D: 41
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Connecticut

SENATE HOUSE
R: 12 R: 59
D: 24 D: 92
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Delaware

SENATE HOUSE
R: 9 R: 15
D: 12 D: 26
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Florida

SENATE HOUSE
R: 23 R: 73
D: 17 D: 47
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Georgia

SENATE HOUSE
R: 35 R: 106
D: 21 D: 74
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Guam

Unicameral
D:  10
R: 5
 
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Hawaii

SENATE HOUSE
R: 1 R: 5
D: 24 D: 46
I: 0 I: 0
V:  0 V:0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Idaho

SENATE HOUSE
R: 28 R: 56
D: 7 D: 14
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Illinois

SENATE HOUSE
R: 19 R: 44
D: 40 D: 74
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Indiana

SENATE HOUSE
R: 40 R: 67
D: 10 D: 33
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Iowa

SENATE HOUSE
R: 32 R: 54
D: 18 D: 46
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Kansas

SENATE HOUSE
R: 31 R: 85
D: 9 D: 40
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Kentucky

SENATE HOUSE
R: 28 R: 61
D: 10 D: 39
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Louisiana

SENATE HOUSE
R: 25 R: 62
D: 14 D: 39
I: 0 I: 3
V: 0 V: 1
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Maine

SENATE HOUSE
R: 14 R: 57
D: 21 D: 89
I: 0 I: 5
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Maryland

SENATE HOUSE
R: 15 R: 43
D: 32 D: 98
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Massachusetts

SENATE HOUSE
R: 6 R: 32
D: 34 D: 127
I: 0 I: 1
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Michigan

SENATE HOUSE
R: 22 R: 58
D: 16 D: 52
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Minnesota

SENATE HOUSE
R: 34 R: 59
D: 33 D: 75
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Mississippi

SENATE HOUSE
R: 36 R: 75
D: 16 D: 46
I: 0 I: 1
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Missouri

SENATE HOUSE
R: 24 R: 116
D: 10 D: 74
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Montana

SENATE HOUSE
R: 31 R: 58
D: 19 D: 42
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Northern Mariana Islands

SENATE
D: 0 R: 9
Other: 0
HOUSE
D: 0 R: 15
Other: 5
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Nebraska

Unicameral
49
 
 
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Nevada

SENATE HOUSE
R: 8 R: 13
D: 13 D: 29
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

New Hampshire

SENATE HOUSE
R: 10 R: 167
D: 14 D: 233
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

New York

SENATE HOUSE
R: 23 R: 43
D: 40 D: 106
I: 0 I: 1
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

New Jersey

SENATE HOUSE
R: 15 R 30
D: 25 D: 50
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

New Mexico

SENATE HOUSE
R: 16 R: 24
D: 26 D: 46
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

North Carolina

SENATE HOUSE
R: 29 R: 65
D: 21 D: 55
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

North Dakota

SENATE HOUSE
R: 37 R: 79
D: 10 D: 15
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Ohio

SENATE HOUSE
R: 25 R: 62
D: 8 D: 37
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Oklahoma

SENATE HOUSE
R: 39 R: 76
D: 9 D: 25
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Oregon

SENATE HOUSE
R: 12 R: 22
D: 18 D: 38
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Puerto Rico

SENATE HOUSE
NPP: 21 NPP: 34
PDP: 7 PDP: 16
Other: 2 Other: 1
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Rhode Island

SENATE HOUSE
R: 5 R: 9
D: 33 D: 66
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

South Carolina

SENATE HOUSE
R: 27 R: 80
D: 19 D: 44
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Pennsylvania

SENATE HOUSE
R: 29 R: 110
D: 21 D: 93
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

South Dakota

SENATE HOUSE
R: 30 R: 59
D: 5 D: 11
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Tennessee

SENATE HOUSE
R: 28 R: 73
D: 5 D: 26
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Texas

SENATE HOUSE
R: 19 R: 83
D: 12 D: 67
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Utah

SENATE HOUSE
R: 23 R: 58
D: 6 D: 17
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Vermont

SENATE HOUSE
R: 6 R: 42
D: 24 D: 95
I: 0 I: 13
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Virginia

SENATE HOUSE
R: 19 R: 45
D: 21 D: 55
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Virgin Island

Unicameral
R: 0
D: 11
Other: 4
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

District of Columbia

Unicameral
D: 12
R: 0
Other: 1
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Washington

SENATE HOUSE
R: 21 R: 42
D: 28 D: 56
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

West Virgina

SENATE HOUSE
R: 20 R: 59
D: 14 D: 41
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Wisconsin

SENATE HOUSE
R: 19 R: 64
D: 14 D: 35
I: 0 I: 0
V: 0 V: 0
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Wyoming

SENATE HOUSE
R: 27 R: 50
D: 3 D: 9
I: 0 I: 1
V: 0 V: 0
 

 

2019 State Legislative Races

The headline from the 2019 legislative elections around the nation is that Democrats were able to overcome narrow deficits in Virginia to regain control of the Legislature for the first time in over twenty years. Elsewhere, the status quo remains in place in legislatures in Louisiana, Mississippi and New Jersey legislatures, with the majority party in each state holding onto their commanding leads.

Going into Election Day, Nov. 5, Virginia Republicans held a 21-19 seat advantage in the State Senate and a 51-49 lead in the House of Delegates – with their control of the House resting on a single seat decided by random drawing in 2017. As of Nov. 6, Democrats reversed both advantages and now hold a 21-19 seat advantage in the State Senate and a 55-45 lead in the House. 2020 will mark the first legislative session since 2011 that Democrats have control of Virginia’s Senate and the first session since 1999 that they have had control of the House of Delegates.

Elections also took place this November for all 80 seats in the New Jersey General Assembly, all 174 seats in the Mississippi House and Senate and all 144 seats in Louisiana's legislature. Results have partisan makeup of all three of these states relatively unchanged, but not without a few surprises.

  • Going into the election Democrats held a commanding 54-26 seat advantage in the New Jersey General Assembly; however, a strong showing from Republicans in Districts 1 and 2 has resulted in all four seats from those districts flipping in Republicans’ favor (New Jersey General Assembly districts are two-member districts) putting partisan control at 50 Democrats to 30 Republicans.
  • In Mississippi, Republicans consolidated their lead in the State Senate by picking up two seats, putting their total up to 36 seats to Democrats’ 16. In the Mississippi House, a handful of races are yet to be called as of Nov. 6, however it appears that Republicans’ 75-45 advantage (with two independents) will remain.
  • On Saturday, Nov. 16, voters in Louisiana voted for stability, maintaining and in fact expanding strong Republican majorities in both chambers. In the Senate, the GOP picked up two seats, for a 27-12 advantage, and in the House unofficial results show that Republicans made gains, standing now at 68 Republicans, 35 Democrats, one Independent and one with no party affiliations. 

21 special elections also took place Nov. 5 across 12 states resulting in three seats changing party hands: New Jersey Senate District 1 flipped from Democrats to Republicans, Missouri House District 99 flipped from Republicans to Democrats and Texas House District 28 also flipped to Democrats.

A complete overview of partisan control of the legislatures is available in this table.

For questions about legislative control and state control, contact John Mahoney or Wendy Underhill.

Post-Election State Control AK WA MT ND NH VT NY MI MN WI OH PA CT NJ RI MA NV OR ID WY SD IA IL IN MO NE HI CO TN AR KS UT CA DE MD WV KY FL SC TX DC AL MS LA OK AZ NC ME VA NM GA PR GU VI AS MP
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

State Map

Click on a state to see chamber and gubernatorial control.
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Alabama

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor: 
Kay Ivey (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Alaska

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Mike Dunleavy (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

American Samoa

UNICAMERAL  
Nonpartisan  
Governor: 
Lolo Moliga (I)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Arizona

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Doug Ducey (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Arkansas

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Asa Hutchinson (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

California

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Gavin Newsom (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Colorado

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Jared Polis (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Connecticut

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Ned Lamont (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

District of Columbia

Unicameral
D
 
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Delaware

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
John Carney (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Florida

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Ron DeSantis (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Georgia

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor: Brian Kemp (R)
 
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Guam

UNICAMERAL  
D  
Governor:
Leon Guerrero-Tenorio (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Hawaii

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
David Ige (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Idaho

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Brad Little (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Illinois

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
J.B. Pritzker (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Indiana

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Eric Holcomb (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Iowa

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Kim Reynolds (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Kansas

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Laura Kelly (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Kentucky

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Andy Beshear (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Louisiana

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
John Bel Edwards (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Maine

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Janet Mills (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Maryland

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Larry Hogan (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Massachusetts

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Charlie Baker (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Michigan

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Gretchen Whitmer (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Minnesota

SENATE HOUSE
R D
Governor:
Tim Walz (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Mississippi

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Phil Bryant (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Missouri

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Eric Greitens (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Montana

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Steve Bullock (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Nebraska

Unicameral
Non Partisan
Governor:
Pete Ricketts (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Nevada

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Steve Sisolak (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

New Hampshire

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
| Chris Sununu (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

New York

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Andrew Cuomo (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

New Jersey

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Phill Murphy (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

New Mexico

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Michelle Lujan Grisham (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

North Carolina

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Roy Cooper (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

North Dakota

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Doug Burgum (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Ohio

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Mike DeWine (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Oklahoma

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Kevin Stitt (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Oregon

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Kate Brown (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Pennsylvania

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Tom Wolf (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Puerto Rico

SENATE HOUSE
NPP NPP
Governor:
Richard Rossello (NPP)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Rhode Island

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Gina Raimondo (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

South Carolina

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Henry McMaster (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

South Dakota

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Kristi Noem (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Tennessee

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Bill Lee (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Texas

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Greg Abbott (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Utah

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Gary Herbert (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Vermont

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Phil Scott (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Virginia

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Ralph Northam (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Washington

SENATE HOUSE
D D
Governor:
Jay Inslee (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Virgin Islands

UNICAMERAL
D
Governor:
Kenneth Mapp (I)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Northern Marianas

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Ralph Torres (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

West Virgina

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Jim Justice (R)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan

Wisconsin

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Tony Evers (D)
LEGEND:
  Republican
  Democrat
  Split
  Nonpartisan
  Not decided

Wyoming

SENATE HOUSE
R R
Governor:
Mark Gordon (R)

State control refers to the states where all three political power bases—both chambers of the legislature and the governorship—are held by the same party. This is sometimes called a trifecta.

State Control

Democrats’ strong performance in Virginia’s legislative elections on Nov. 5 has resulted in the Old Dominion becoming the 15th state under total Democratic control. Governor Ralph Northam beat out Republican Ed Gillespie in 2017 to divide state control for the first time since 2013 when a tied state senate resulted in divided government. Now, with both the governorship and the legislature blue, Democrats are enjoying an advantage they have not had in Virginia since 1994.

The other big news from election night comes from Kentucky where Democrat Andy Beshear’s upset over incumbent Republican Governor Matt Bevin means Kentucky has returned to divided state government.  

Finally, Mississippi’s Governor’s race between Lieutenant Governor Tate Reeves and popular Democrat Attorney General Jim Hood was firmly won by the Reeves. Although some had tapped this to be a competitive race for the Democrats, Reeves was able to win out on Election Day to keep control of Mississippi’s state government solidly red.

On Nov. 16, Louisiana's governorship was retained by incumbent John Bel Edwards. Because the legislature is solidly Republican -- in fact gained Republican seats this election -- Louisiana's state control remains divided. 

Nationwide, 21 states are under full Republican control (both chambers and the governorship), 15 are under full Democratic control, and 13 have divided control. 

For questions about state control, contact John Mahoney or Wendy Underhill.

StateVote Ballot Measures

 

For full details on the current crop of 2019 measures and for years previous, please keep checking back to our Statewide Ballot Measure Database.

Ballot Measure Database

Twenty ballot measures were voted on across seven states on Nov. 5. Earlier this year, Louisianans voted on four measures at their statewide primary on Oct. 12, and citizens in the U.S. Virgin Islands voted on one measure during a special election held March 30, bringing the total number of measures in 2019 to 25. This tally is similar to the numbers seen in recent off-year elections. In 2017, there were 27 measures; in 2015, there were 28; in 2013, there were 26.

Only three of this year’s measures were citizen’s initiatives (sponsored by groups who have gathered enough signatures to qualify the measure to be put on the ballot). Two of these initiatives came out of Washington, and the third was the Virgin Islands measure.

Nineteen of the 25 ballot measures were constitutional amendments, with only five making statutory changes. Twenty-two of these measures were legislative referendums, meaning they originated as bills that passed the legislature and then required the voters’ ratification before they could become a law.

The ballot measure topics were similar to those in recent years, including taxes, criminal justice and redistricting.

Taxes: Colorado had two measures related to taxes. Voters rejected Proposition CC, a measure to provide additional funding to transportation and education projects. Currently, the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) law in Colorado prohibits the state from keeping any surplus revenue, and the failed measure would have allowed the state to keep and spend all the revenue it annually collects and use any surplus for transportation and education projects.

The second Colorado measure, Proposition DD, asked voters to allow wagering on sports events, a topic that has been of interest across the states since a U.S. Supreme Court decision lifted the federal prohibition on sports gambling in May 2018, allowing states to collect taxes on those earnings. Coloradans voted to pass this measure, which will collect a 10% tax on earnings from sports betting, and this revenue is earmarked for funding water projects in the state. 

One of Washington’s two citizen’s initiatives, Initiative 976, concerned the tax fees for car-tabs—the registration stickers put on vehicles' license plates to show the month and year when the registration will expire. Voters in the Evergreen State chose to pass this initiative, fixing annual fees to $30 for motor vehicles under 10,000 pounds and removing local government’s authority to approve certain taxes and charges on vehicles. Seattle and King County, however, have already announced plans to contest the new law's constitutionality.

Louisiana, Maine, New Jersey, and Texas had tax issues on the ballot, as well. Voters in Louisiana authorized education funding, and those in Maine approved a bond issue to improve transportation infrastructure. In New Jersey, voters passed a property tax deduction for veterans who reside in continuing care communities. Texans supported a flood infrastructure fund, increased the maximum bond amount for cancer prevention and research, dedicated taxes on sporting goods to protect natural areas, prohibited state income tax and more.

Criminal Justice: Pennsylvania voters approved Marsy’s Law, a crime victims’ bill of rights, but votes will not be certified until the state courts determine if the proposed law is constitutional. Marsy’s Law has been on the ballot in many states in previous years (seven states voted on it in 2018), yet it has, according to NCSL’s Anne Teigen, “received criticism, opposition and resistance in many states.” In 2017, the Montana Supreme Court ruled their Marsy’s Law amendment unconstitutional, and in June of 2019, the Kentucky Supreme Court came to the same conclusion about their version of Marsy’s Law. 

Redistricting: Two measures were about redistricting. In Kansas, voters approved a legislatively referred measure to end the state’s process for removing nonresident military personnel and nonresident students from census data used for redistricting and joining the vast majority of the states. In the U.S. Virgin Islands, a reapportionment measure failed due to insufficient voter turnout.

Disaster Preparation: Two measures concerned catastrophes and disasters. Texans approved a temporary property tax exemption for disaster areas, and Washington voters okayed a measure to ensure government continuity during a catastrophic incident.

Other Highlights: Texas had the most ballot measures of any state with 10, and voters rejected just one: A measure that asked voters to allow a person to hold more than one municipal judicial office at a time. Texans also approved a measure that would allow a county law enforcement’s dog to be transferred to its handler at the time of the dog’s retirement—approximately 94% of voters said “yes.

In Washington, voters had a chance to overturn a previous ban on affirmative action policies. It was a tight race, but the citizen's initiative failed, and Washington's affirmative action ban will stand. 

You can view all of the ballot measures from the 50 states and Washington, D.C., at the NCSL Ballot Measure Database.

Here are all of the ballot measures with links to their official sources: