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Technology and Digital Learning

Technology and Digital Learning

learning on tablet

ONLINE LEARNING

LegisBrief logo More students than ever before are taking online courses. Options include supplemental online programs that provide a few courses to students; fully online schools that work with students who are enrolled primarily in the online school; and blended learning, which combines online and in-school learning, where students learn at least in part through online content delivery and in part at school.

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TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM

Students with laptops Today’s students are surrounded by computers in nearly all aspects of their life, except when they are in school. Many states are beginning to explore the role laptops and other mobile computing devices can play both in and out of the classroom.

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ONLINE COURSEWORK AS GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

Girl looking at laptop At least four states now include online learning as a high school graduation requirement, often seen as a first step to ensuring all students are technologically literate. 

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CONNECTED LEARNING ADVISORY BOARD

Students with LaptopsThis group of state legislators and legislative staff is exploring how learning institutions – including schools, libraries, museums, and community centers – are leveraging advancements in social and digital media to engage the 21st century learner, increase access to more learning experiences, and allow students to earn credits for learning that occurs both inside and outside of school.

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OVERVIEW | TECHNOLOGY AND DIGITAL LEARNING

Technology is becoming an invaluable tool in today's classrooms. Yet, there is a lot more to education technology then just ensuring every student has access to a computer. Teachers need to be adequately trained in incorporating technology into the daily curriculum and instruction. Students will be better served if they are using technology as an on-going part of the learning process, rather than a separate activity. And while states are improving the infrastructure for education technology, some communities are still lacking the necessary capacity. Rural schools have a greater challenge getting and maintaining high-speed connections for efficient Internet use. Schools serving low-income families, in urban and rural communities, often have fewer resources, which can mean outdated computers and lack of technical support.

Advancements in technology and productivity over the last decade demand new ways of integrating current and future technological innovations into public education. Policymakers are working to provide all students with high quality learning options, regardless of where they live or what school they attend. The expansion of digital and online learning can begin to alleviate inequalities that currently exist between students who have access to high quality teachers and a diverse array of courses and those who lack such access because their schools struggle to attract talent or lack the resources to provide a variety of options.

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