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Dropout Prevention and Recovery

Dropout Prevention and Recovery

COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

College students Research shows that successful high schools provide rigorous academic coursework, relevant learning opportunities, and meaningful relationships with instructors who are qualified to help students achieve high standards.

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ACCELERATED LEARNING OPTIONS

Teacher and student Offering high-quality, college-level learning experiences in high school can increase the academic quality and rigor of high school classes, lower the need for postsecondary remediation, reduce the high school dropout rate, reduce student costs of attending postsecondary institutions, and prepare young people to succeed in college.

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EARLY LITERACY

Students learningProficiency in reading by the end of third grade is a critical milestone that enables students to shift from learning to read to reading to learn. Students who do not meet this milestone often falter in the later grades and drop out before earning a high school diploma.

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DROPOUT PREVENTION AND RECOVERY

Graduation caps being thrown in the airThe costs of dropping out are high—to the student, the states and the nation. Dropouts earn less, have fewer job opportunities, and are far more likely to spend their lives periodically unemployed, on government assistance, or cycling in and out of prison. State legislatures play critical roles in holding schools and districts accountable, setting expectations and raising public awareness of the problem.

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OVERVIEW | DROPOUT PREVENTION AND RECOVERY

The costs of dropping out are high—to the student, to the community and to the nation. Between 1973 and 2008, the share of jobs in the U.S. economy that required postsecondary education increased from 28 percent to 59 percent. During the next decade, that number will increase to 63 percent.

The future is grim for students who do not earn a high school diploma. In the current economic climate, students without diplomas are unemployed at three times the rate of students with college degrees.

Allowing students to drop out of school is a drain on state economies. A state is less attractive to new business investments when its workforce is poorly educated. State budgets are challenged by increased public health costs, higher crime rates, and increased welfare costs for each high school dropout. Most significantly, states face lost tax revenues because dropouts earn significantly less than high school graduates.

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NCSL Summit 2014

FEATURED

  • Dropout Prevention and Recovery

    Includes research and legislative policy recommendations related to dropout prevention and recovery to ensure that all children have a path to high school graduation and are prepared for success in college, work and life.

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