The NCSL Blog

Federalism

31
Time Passages: Could Clock-Switching Be on the Way Out?

Our national, twice yearly ritual of changing clocks occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday, as the official national time shifts from daylight saving time (DST) back to standard time, except for those places that stay on standard time year-round, namely Arizona (except for the Navajo Nation), Hawaii,  American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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14

In New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether New York City’s ban on transporting a handgun to a home or shooting range outside city limits violates the Second Amendment, the Commerce Clause or the constitutional right to travel.

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01
School Bus Safety On and Off the Bus

The federal role in improving school bus safety was the focus of a hearing last week by the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit.

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04
Highlights From the 'Unified Agenda' Regulatory Actions

The White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs has released the Spring 2019 Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions. Commonly known as the “Unified Agenda,” the report is a semiannual update on the administration’s past, present and anticipated regulatory actions across the federal government.

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13
A Battle or a Handshake Ahead for Health Policy?

With the 116th Congress back in full swing and the chambers divided between a Democratic majority in the House and a Republican majority in the Senate, what are the expectations for health policy?

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Category: Federalism, Health
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11
National Emergency Declaration, Explained

The federal government faces another possible shutdown on Friday at midnight, if an agreement over funding for a border wall isn’t found. It’s also possible President Donald Trump may, by executive order, declare a national emergency to build the wall.  We decided to take a closer look at that process.

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06
NCSL Resources on Issues of State Concern Raised During the State of the Union

President Donald Trump touched on a number of issues of significant interest to states during Tuesday's State of the Union address. Here are NCSL resources related to those issues. 

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18
State and Local Legal Center Files Amicus Brief in Agency Authority Case

In an amicus brief in PDR Network, LLC v. Carlton & Harris Chiropractic Inc. the State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) argues that federal courts should be able to refuse to apply federal agency orders which they deem inapplicable even if the orders are covered by the Hobbs Act.

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07
Part One: A Year in Review—2018 Federal Environmental Regulatory Actions

Since taking office, President Donald Trump has been adamant about regulatory reform, and 2018 has been no exception, with the administration hard at work with numerous deregulatory and regulatory actions. Here is the first of our two-part summary of a few of the major actions—both headline and page 3— that have the potential to significantly impact state laws and policies.

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09
2018 FAA Reauthorization Act and Disaster Recovery Reform Act Become Law

The new law includes what’s considered the most comprehensive disaster recovery reform package since Hurricane Katrina.

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About the NCSL Blog

This blog offers updates on the National Conference of State Legislatures' research and training, the latest on federalism and the state legislative institution, and posts about state legislators and legislative staff. The blog is edited by NCSL staff and written primarily by NCSL's experts on public policy and the state legislative institution.